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I tried going cash-only and leaving my credit cards at home and I learned cash is not all it's cracked up to be


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Kat58

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 08:22 PM

http://www.businessi...snt-work-2018-4

 

 





#2 JOOJ

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 11:31 PM

Strange article. Author tried going cash only, but somehow never had cash on their person?

#3 Derek1

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Posted 20 April 2018 - 11:35 PM

Online Purchases, Gas, Big Ticket Items, Travel and Dining out (although I don't put Starbucks or Fast Food on credit).  Beyond that, cash is what I use 90 percent of the time.  It's easier than the article makes it sound. 


Edited by Derek1, 20 April 2018 - 11:38 PM.


#4 centex

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 01:02 PM

Strange article. Author tried going cash only, but somehow never had cash on their person?

EXACTLY ^^^

 

It isn't that difficult to pay for things with cash when you are planning it.  And even if not, some people can still manage it...I don't use a lot of cash in day-to-day transactions but probably have a few thousand on me most days (always prepared for a poker game).  Those amounts are typically big bills, though, so that pretty much stops me from using it when I go to grab a bottle of soda on my way into the office (they COULD break it for me, but I am not going to be THAT person).  Trip to the vet...good to go if a cash discount is available (it wasn't today, so that went on an AXP product instead). 

 

And the whole nonsense in there about counting pennies at a counter...if they were truly trying to go cash only, then they were the most disorganized household known to exist.  This isn't high school where you are scrounging under the seat for pennies to get a half-gallon of gas (well, back in the days when you could do that for a quarter). 



#5 cashnocredit

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 01:08 PM

Strange article. Author tried going cash only, but somehow never had cash on their person?

Yeah, I thought that funny too.

 

I was cash only for years only rarely using a debit card for large purchases. One day at Fry's, the WF system was down nationwide for a few hours and my debit card was declined. Turned out I had enough cash for the purchase.



#6 Cactus Flower

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 04:24 PM

The biggest problem I've had is the clerk not having enough change in the register if you buy a $4 item with a $20...

 

then you stand there and wait while she/he calls their supervisor etc etc.



#7 centex

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 09:37 AM

The biggest problem I've had is the clerk not having enough change in the register if you buy a $4 item with a $20...

 

then you stand there and wait while she/he calls their supervisor etc etc.

Even worse is watching their head explode when you give them some extra change so that you don't get stuck with a bunch of pennies...have one place where (for example) the total is x.88 and I will give y.13 so that the loose change part is an even quarter.  They get lost because they saw the paper bill but not the complete payment...

 

Topping that would be going somewhere when the computers are down and they have to compute the full transaction by hand (or in their head).  Usually this will only occur when there has been a power outage and the business is still trying to operate (like a fast food joint following a major storm that knocks out power but the business wants to 'help' the community by being open). 



#8 cashnocredit

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 11:29 AM

 

The biggest problem I've had is the clerk not having enough change in the register if you buy a $4 item with a $20...

 

then you stand there and wait while she/he calls their supervisor etc etc.

Even worse is watching their head explode when you give them some extra change so that you don't get stuck with a bunch of pennies...have one place where (for example) the total is x.88 and I will give y.13 so that the loose change part is an even quarter.  They get lost because they saw the paper bill but not the complete payment...

 

Topping that would be going somewhere when the computers are down and they have to compute the full transaction by hand (or in their head).  Usually this will only occur when there has been a power outage and the business is still trying to operate (like a fast food joint following a major storm that knocks out power but the business wants to 'help' the community by being open). 

 

Interesting observation.

 

Used to be that kids learned early about counting change. Getting an allowance and figuring out value of things incented learning arithmetic. Tangible cause and effect is much more effective at teaching than sitting through a classroom lecture about seemingly abstract numbers. The trend to cashless transactions, when it trickles down to kids and their allowance, is going to have a significant effect on math education.



#9 Sidewinder

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 01:36 PM

Most hilarious word in the entire article?

"Copyright."

#10 brainchasm

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Posted 23 April 2018 - 04:58 PM

I am cashless.

 

I get cash and it's weird.  I don't know where to use it that makes sense.  I usually end up giving it to the kids.



#11 tnts4me

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Posted 24 April 2018 - 08:43 PM

 

The biggest problem I've had is the clerk not having enough change in the register if you buy a $4 item with a $20...

 

then you stand there and wait while she/he calls their supervisor etc etc.

Even worse is watching their head explode when you give them some extra change so that you don't get stuck with a bunch of pennies...have one place where (for example) the total is x.88 and I will give y.13 so that the loose change part is an even quarter.  They get lost because they saw the paper bill but not the complete payment...

 

Topping that would be going somewhere when the computers are down and they have to compute the full transaction by hand (or in their head).  Usually this will only occur when there has been a power outage and the business is still trying to operate (like a fast food joint following a major storm that knocks out power but the business wants to 'help' the community by being open). 

 

 

 

Count....pun...lol, me as one of those one who is always trying to get the least amount of change or paper money back.   Bill could be 8.38 and I'd give them 13.53, they are like huh.....  until they punch it into the register to see the amount to give back. 



#12 Derek1

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Posted 26 April 2018 - 11:21 PM

I am cashless.

 

I get cash and it's weird.  I don't know where to use it that makes sense.  I usually end up giving it to the kids.

Eh!  Anything under $40 (that's not Gas) is a cash transaction for me.  Personally I find I don't overspend on cash, since I have a set amount in my wallet.  And whatever change I get back usually goes into a jar to be redeposited in the bank. 



#13 Chris58

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 03:31 AM

Financially responsible people should NEVER use cash, (why not let a bank handle the transactions, pay them once per month and pocket the rewards).

 

Financially irresponsible people should NEVER even possess a credit card, (and if they possess a debit card they should be "Opted-Out" of allowing overdrafts).



#14 Derek1

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 11:28 AM

The article says it all about why people use credit more often than not. 

 

"I'm actually terrible about keeping a real budget."

 

Not much more needs to be said. 



#15 ukaserex

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 12:17 PM

A month ago, I'd used my last bit of cash to get a bottle of water at the gym, as I'd forgotten to grab mine from work. (I get a 49 cent bottle from Whole Foods ..not sure why the most expensive grocery store charges less for water than anyone else, but I digress) 

The military trained me to always carry at least $5, but now that things cost a lot more, I try to always have a $20. ... This darn $20 has been in my wallet for a month. The only place I might need cash is a garage sale or the flea market - and I just don't frequent those places that often. 

 

I suspect we'll see a day when cash simply doesn't exist, except for collectors. 






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