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Royal Caribbean's Icon of the Seas, world's largest cruise liner, gearing up for first cruise

 

I don't get what the appeal is.

 

If I ever take a cruise. It will be on Queen Mary II, or one of Viking's offerings. Or something along those refinements.

 

Water slides, endless buffets, kids and adults with no manners, and variety hour type entertainment shows just are not my thing.

 

 

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I grasp that the idea of being confined on a ship with 5000 other passengers (not to mention 2000 crewmembers) sound like the epitome of a nightmare.  That certainly was my take in advance of my first sailing.  I'm largely a solitary soul and treasure my privacy.

 

When you disperse that many people over a sufficiently large ship it becomes a very civil situation where you can actually isolate yourself occasionally, when needed, without confining yourself to your cabin.

 

Dining is pleasurable and satisfying, we tend to steer clear of the pools/hot tubs rxcept later in the evening.  We strive to upgrade to a cabin with a large balcony that gets lots of sun for most days of the cruise.

 

The true appeal of a cruise are destination ports that are interesting and intriguing; an exceptional opportunity to sample a smattering of locations that we occasionally elect to return to at a later time to explore at greater length.

 

I expanded on such thoughts here in the past.  Search if you're interested in my greater take on cruising.

 

 

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@Kat58, there's no question that (as with other aspects of life), when cruising, sPit happens.  And I don't question that cruising is more prone to such incidents.

 

The biggest disappointment we've encountered in 20 sailings was when the Athens cruise port was closed due to a country-wide labor strike.  That was a bit of a blow, but we expect to get back there sometime.  Instead, the ship stopped at Mykenos.  I had a blast touring the island and its beaches on a scooter! 

 

No doubt, we've all seen reports of the hellish Covid-impactrd cruises.  Knock on wood, we've not been so unfortunate.  (I did contract Hep A in Mexico and was ill for a couple of days; not diagnosed until a couple of years later when I tested positive for exposure).

 

If you're not inclined to "roll with the punches", it might be best to opt out of cruising.  But Bev and I have enjoyed some solid times and are itching to return when Bev is stronger (god willing).

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On 1/7/2024 at 10:05 AM, MarvBear said:

I would freak out with such a crowd.  I haven't ever been on a cruise, and I simply cannot comprehend the fascination.  There isn't enough valium to keep me stress free around a crowd like that.

I *almost* went on a cruise once, but the idea of cramped ship quarters, nowhere to go if Titanic Part 2, and reports of people stuck on ships.. I decided I no longer wanted to go and I'm not sure I get the appeal either. Though someone DID once think I worked for MSC which apparently is a cruise line :lol:

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  • 1 month later...

I've been on two cruises in my life, but can't imagine being on a boat that can hold the entire population of a small city.

 

I went to Royal Caribbean's Facebook page and saw they posted a video about their monster ship. I asked if there are enough lifeboats, or is it just women and children. They didn't answer my question.

 

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4 hours ago, Burgerwars said:

I asked if there are enough lifeboats, or is it just women and children.

If you're worried about a cruise ship disaster, here's a quick answer: On November 15, 2023, the Ocean Vista cruise ship sank off the coast of Italy after colliding with an underwater rock formation. It was one of the worst cruise ship disasters in recent years, leaving more than 200 passengers missing and presumed dead.

 

Cruise ship accidents are relatively rare, but the consequences can be tragic when they occur (the Titanic sank in 1912). Another tragic example is the sinking of the Costa Concordia in 2012, which killed 32 people, I think the cowardly Captain was criminally convicted of abandoning the ship.

 

I believe it is difficult to accurately predict the catastrophic events and casualties of future cruise ship sinkings, and it is critical for cruise lines to prioritize passenger safety and develop effective emergency response plans to minimize casualties. Missing passengers can also be a significant problem when a ship sinks, as it can be challenging to know what happened to everyone on board, especially in chaotic situations.

 

There are incidents of passengers missing and falling aboard and sinister events that make people cringe and cower while on a cruise ship, some folks do have an intense phobia of traveling on a cruise ship, but, most folks are happy enjoying a wonderful trip!

 

Question???...


Just wondering how many lifeboats are available on a ship with a capacity of 5,000 people.

 

Sadly, I don't think there are enough lifeboats on the cruise ship for everyone, presumably the ship doesn't have room to accommodate that capacity.

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9 hours ago, MP80 said:

November 15, 2023, the Ocean Vista cruise ship sank off the coast of Italy

 

I fear you pulled that from a fake article. As far as I can tell that never happened.

 

As for life boats and rafts requirements.

 

 

Quote

Each side of the ship must have the capacity for 50% of the total souls on board, pax and crew, to be accommodated in covered life boats. Then the ship must have a number of inflatable life rafts to cover an additional 25% of the total for a total capacity of 125%

 

However with waivers this can be reduced to 37.5% covered lifeboat capacity each side for a total of 75%, they then need inflatable life rafts capable of taking 50% of the total. Still the same 125% total.

 

 

 

Quote

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS); ships must have lifeboats for 50% of the total capacity of people aboard on each side (totaling 100%). There is an exception if the ship is only engaged in a "short international voyage", where it is only required that you have enough for 30% of the total capacity of people aboard on each side (totaling 60%).

But, please note: this is before "life rafts" are counted. So, after all is said and done, all ships will have Life Saving Appliances (LSAs) with the capacity of at least 25% over the total soul on board.


At the discretion of the flag state the lifeboat capacity on each side can be reduced to 37.5% of the total number on board with the shortfall being made up with liferafts. For passenger vessels on short international voyages, it is permissible for the lifeboat capacity to be reduced and replaced with liferafts. In all cases there must also be additional liferaft capacity to cover 25% of the total on board.

 

 

 

 

Quote

https://www.imorules.com/SOLAS_REGIII.B.II.21.1.html

 

Lloyd’s Register Rulefinder 2005  Version 9.4
SOLAS - International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea
Chapter III - Life-saving appliances and arrangements - Part B -
Requirements for ships and life-saving appliances
Section II - Passenger Ships (Additional Requirements)
Regulation 21 - Survival craft and rescue boats


1 Survival craft

1.1. Passenger ships engaged on international voyages which are not short international voyages shall carry:


.1. partially or totally enclosed lifeboats complying with the requirements of section 4.5 or 4.6 of the Code on each side of such aggregate
capacity as will accommodate not less than 50% of the total number of persons on board. The Administration may permit the substitution of
lifeboats by liferafts of equivalent total capacity provided that there shall never be less than sufficient lifeboats on each side of the ship to
accommodate 37.5% of the total number of persons on board. The inflatable or rigid liferafts shall comply with the requirements of section 4.2
or 4.3 of the Code and shall be served by launching appliances equally distributed on each side of the ship, and


.2. in addition, inflatable or rigid liferafts complying with the requirements of section 4.2 or 4.3 of the Code of such aggregate capacity as will
accommodate at least 25% of the total number of persons on board. These liferafts shall be served by at least one launching appliance on
each side which may be those provided in compliance with the requirements of paragraph 1.1.1 or equivalent approved appliances capable of
being used on both sides. However, stowage of these liferafts need not comply with the requirements of regulation 13.5.


1.2. Passenger ships engaged on short international voyages and complying with the special standards of subdivision prescribed by regulation
II-1/6.5 shall carry:


.1. partially or totally enclosed lifeboats complying with the requirements of section 4.5 or 4.6 of the Code of such aggregate capacity as will
accommodate at least 30% of the total number of persons on board. The lifeboats shall, as far as practicable, be equally distributed on each
side of the ship. In addition inflatable or rigid liferafts complying with the requirements of section 4.2 or 4.3 of the Code shall be carried of such
aggregate capacity that, together with the lifeboat capacity, the survival craft will accommodate the total number of persons on board. The
liferafts shall be served by launching appliances equally distributed on each side of the ship; and


.2. in addition, inflatable or rigid liferafts complying with the requirements of section 4.2 or 4.3 of the Code of such aggregate capacity as will
accommodate at least 25% of the total number of persons on board. These liferafts shall be served by at least one launching appliance on
each side which may be those provided in compliance with the requirements of paragraph 1.2.1 or equivalent approved appliances capable of
being used on both sides. However, stowage of these liferafts need not comply with the requirements of regulation 13.5.


1.3. Passenger ships engaged on short international voyages and not complying with the special standards of subdivision prescribed by
regulation II-1/6.5, shall carry survival craft complying with the requirements of paragraph 1.1.


1.4. All survival craft required to provide for abandonment by the total number of persons on board shall be capable of being launched with
their full complement of persons and equipment within a period of 30 min from the time the abandon ship signal is given.


1.5. In lieu of meeting the requirements of paragraph 1.1, 1.2 or 1.3, passenger ships of less than 500 gross tonnage where the total number of
persons on board is less than 200, may comply with the following:


.1. They shall carry on each side of the ship, inflatable or rigid liferafts complying with the requirements of section 4.2 or 4.3 of the Code and of
such aggregate capacity as will accommodate the total number of persons on board;


.2. Unless the liferafts required by paragraph 1.5.1 are stowed in a position providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open deck level,
additional liferafts shall be provided so that the total capacity available on each side will accommodate 150% of the total number of persons on
board.


.3. If the rescue boat required by paragraph 2.2 is also a partially or totally enclosed lifeboat complying with the requirements of section 4.5 or
4.6 of the Code, it may be included in the aggregate capacity required by paragraph 1.5.1, provided that the total capacity available on either
side of the ship is at least 150% of the total number of persons on board; and


.4. In the event of any one survival craft being lost or rendered unserviceable, there shall be sufficient survival craft available for use on each
side, including those which are stowed in a position providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open deck level, to accommodate the
total number of persons on board.


1.6. A marine evacuation system or systems complying with section 6.2 of the Code may be substituted for the equivalent capacity of liferafts
and launching appliances required by paragraph 1.1.1 or 1.2.1.


SOLAS - International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea
Chapter III - Life-saving appliances and arrangements - Part B -
Requirements for ships and life-saving appliances
Section II - Passenger Ships (Additional Requirements)
Regulation 21 - Survival craft and rescue boats

 

2 Rescue boats

2.1. Passenger ships of 500 gross tonnage and over shall carry at least one rescue boat complying with the requirements of section 5.1 of the
Code on each side of the ship.

 

2.2. Passenger ships of less than 500 gross tonnage shall carry at least one rescue boat complying with the requirements of section 5.1 of the
Code.

 

2.3. A lifeboat may be accepted as a rescue boat provided it also complies with the requirements for a rescue boat.

https://www.imorules.com/SOLAS_REGIII.B.II.21.1.html

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One thing I wonder is let's say the Icon of the Seas hits an iceberg and will be going down in two hours. Given it takes most of the day for passengers to board, how do you get them all off on lifeboats in two hours? Passengers will go to their muster stations and then wait. As they sense the boat is sinking, panic sets in, and pandemonium and total disorder follows. They may have enough lifeboats but not enough time. 

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17 hours ago, greendeh said:

I fear you pulled that from a fake article. As far as I can tell that never happened.

The person who wrote about the sinking of Ocean Vista was not a reporter, nor a journalist I think she is a frequent traveler around the globe and has been to many places seeing many things.

 

but to allege her fabricating a catastrophic disaster of such magnitude of calamity doesn't add up to muster, other than wasting her time, and if exposed, will ruin her reputation and career, but what do I know?

 

Here's her credential...

 

https://www.solotravellerapp.com/

 

YYEZEtu.jpg

 

Tr0ZBOY.jpg

 

6YXHCuD.jpg

 

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5 hours ago, MP80 said:

Here's her credential...

 

Wow is all I can say. Your ability for research and to defend is second to none.

 

That is a fake article.

Here let me link the fake article here for all to see.

https://www.solotravellerapp.com/cruise-ship-sinking-2023/

 

You had to make those screen shots. You going to tell me you literally didn't read ANYTHING ELSE?

 

spacer.png

 

 

 

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There was no cruise ship sinking on November 15th, 2023.

There was no cruise ship sinking in 2023

 

 

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13 hours ago, greendeh said:

You going to tell me you literally didn't read ANYTHING ELSE?

Yes, I initially just cherry-picked her articles and ignored all the details. I went back to look for news about the incident, but no other sources reported news about the sinking of the Ocean Vista cruise ship, and obviously, I suspected the news was concocted by her.

 

I admire her credentials for traveling the journey around the globe which gave her a plethora of perspectives, not the article column she wrote.

 

I referenced three ocean liners being sunk, the Titanic, and the Costa Concordia, and this outrageous fabricated story about the Ocean Vista, despite the fallacy of that, my focus point view was on the risk of life of getting aboard one of these gigantic ocean cruise liners. Different people have different phobias, this is one of them, joyriding on a cruise.

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From the Googler............

 

Quote

According to the law, cruise lines do not need enough lifeboats for everyone if there is a capacity for 37.5% of guests on each side of a ship. This equals 75% (37.5 x 2) in total. The remaining people can be rescued using life rafts. Most cruises incorporate the additional capacity for lifeboats.

 

So basically a combination of life boats and life rafts.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
22 hours ago, Burgerwars said:

Bernard Hill, the captain in the movie Titanic, passed away. 😞

 

The actor or the real Captain of the Titanic?

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