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Greetings all - long time no chat!!


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Hey Everyone!!

 

I haven't been on here in eons, and something came up and it made me think of CB since there's a wealth of all kinds of knowledge on here.

 

Background - I have a 2-story house built on a large crawlspace (I can stand up in it and not hit my head).  There has always been an access door outside to the crawlspace.  Since it's such a large area, and the fact I have no garage, I use it for storage.   There is an electrical outlet down there, lights, and I run a dehumidifier as well.

 

What I'm trying to do is take an unused, small closet in the living area, cut a hole in the floor and put in stairs to make an interior entry to the crawlspace, rather than have to go out into the elements each time I want something.  Of course, there is a joist in the way.  This is way, waayyy beyond my scope of skill, even though I know the basics of what needs to be done (floor joist support, cut the joist, box it in).  So I'll need to hire a contractor.  I tried googling to find out what I'd be getting myself into, but I don't know what this procedure is called, or how to ask about it on google.  Does anyone have an idea what this would cost me for a 2' x 2' scuttle hole?  Or what it's called so I can research it?

 

In case any of the old timers are wondering, I do still have my old Explorer, just recently passed inspection again, and coming up on 549,000 miles.  :D

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A concern with using a contractor is that some permits may need to be pulled...and such construction likely also introduces not only multiple inspections, but could also serve to increase property taxes.  I had a similar sort of crawlspace under one of the Austin houses I lived in...and had similar thoughts but never pursued it to determine what would need to be done. 

 

Are the rooms carpeted or are they wood/laminate flooring?  May be easier to look at a floor-version of attic access that allows you to cut a longer opening that doesn't require as much joist work to maintain structural integrity. 

 

Good work on the Explorer...as I remember, you have that 4.0L that was almost bulletproof as long as it had basic maintenance (I had that in the Ranger). 

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We call that a basement here in the northland. 🤪 This should be a fairly easy job, for a good contractor, putting in a couple of additional supports to make up for cutting the joist.

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I don't know if it's possible to add anything, like a staircase from the upper floor to the basement of the crawl space, since you detect that the area is over 6 feet in height, you may need to ask your city building inspector if it's legal to do a work assignment. :)

 

I think this is a garage remodeling topic. This used to be illegal in the building inspection codes of San Francisco, hazardous areas for living due to upcoming plumbing sewers and electrical wiring exposed everywhere, it's legal now, given that population growth has been unexpectedly huge over the past 40 years.

 

Things have changed to be more suitable for tenants or landlords and building inspection codes have changed as a result of seeing a dramatic increase in population and not enough accommodation for rental living apartment studios or just one-person rooms.

 

My sister owns a house in San Francisco and she remodeled the garage in the 90s, creating a gateway from the upper floor to the garage, connected by stairs. Additionally, she co-created 1 living room, 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom with toilet and tub, and 1 parking space in the garage for a total of $30,000. Today's price is about $80,000 or more. My sister charges student tenants over $1000 per room per month.

 

I think adding a staircase along with the building owner's permit to do it yourself would cost a few thousand dollars and hiring a building contractor would add a few thousand dollars more to what I mentioned. However, if you don't know anything about building inspection codes, then I recommend hiring someone with a contractor's license to do the work for you.

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