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Some medical debt is being removed from US credit reports


cashnocredit
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https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/some-medical-debt-is-being-removed-from-us-credit-reports/ar-AAZ35Fw


 

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Starting Friday, the three major U.S. credit reporting companies will stop counting paid medical debt on the reports that banks, potential landlords and others use to judge creditworthiness.  The companies also will start giving people a year to resolve delinquent medical debt that has been sent to collections before reporting it — up from six months previously.

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Next year, the companies also will stop counting unpaid medical debt under at least $500.


 

 

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  • 1 month later...

On 7/1/2022 at 3:49 AM, cashnocredit said:

 

While I think they should play reporting to make sure any confusion about whether insurance will ultimately pay or not, I think it's absurd that unpaid medical bills aren't factored into your creditworthiness.  

 

Sick?  Can't pay unexpected medical expenses?  Who gives a flying fook!  Join the Army!

 

Next they will say that you can run up a $10,000 bill at WalMart for food and not have it appear on your credit reports when you stiff them because, after all, eating is a human right.

 

 

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