Jump to content

AmEx won't let me overpay; how to prevent trailing interest?


Recommended Posts

See, my AmEx BCE balance is $699, and I want my next statement to report a $0 balance (my score is hurt by "too many accounts with balances).  Since the most recent interest charge is $10.84 (and no transactions for months now) I tried to pay $725, but the website blocked me from paying a penny more than the total $699 balance.

 

Is it worth it to call a rep and see if my 0-balance-quest can go through?  Or am I stuck with a $10 trailing interest balance next period...

Edited by Sidewinder
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Sidewinder said:

See, my AmEx BCE balance is $699, and I want my next statement to report a $0 balance (my score is hurt by "too many accounts with balances).  Since the most recent interest charge is $10.84 (and no transactions for months now) I tried to pay $725, but the website blocked me from paying a penny more than the total $699 balance.

 

Is it worth it to call a rep and see if my 0-balance-quest can go through?  Or am I stuck with a $10 trailing interest balance next period...

 

The easiest way, for me, is to send Amex whatever amount of payment you want, using your bank's BillPay service (that is, not initiated through the Amex site). Amex will post the overpayment and show a credit balance. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
See, my AmEx BCE balance is $699, and I want my next statement to report a $0 balance (my score is hurt by "too many accounts with balances).  Since the most recent interest charge is $10.84 (and no transactions for months now) I tried to pay $725, but the website blocked me from paying a penny more than the total $699 balance.
 
Is it worth it to call a rep and see if my 0-balance-quest can go through?  Or am I stuck with a $10 trailing interest balance next period...


That's strange since AmEx always lets me overpay. There were one or two times when it wouldn't, but that was when I had already initiated a payment that was pending. Once it posted, they let me make another payment against a $0 balance.

You can follow Sharky's suggestion and push a payment over via BillPay.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites

My Amex payment experience is a little at odds with @PotO and more consistent with that of @Sidewinder.  The payment portal will only accept a payment amount up to the current balance.  However, once a enter a payment (scheduled for a future date), it will accept a second payment (again, limited by the current account balance, but not reduced by the existing scheduled payment). 

 

So, trying this on for size, starting with a statement balance of $0, I was able to enter a payment for my current period charges of $845, which I scheduled for my 11/24 due date.  I then went right back in and entered an additional payment of $200 (which I allowed to post immediately, but likely could have scheduled as well).  It was accepted with no problem.

 

The problem I suspect @sidewinder is encountering is that the first payment was likely permitted to post and reduce the current account balance prior to the attempt to make an additional payment.  As "Sharky" suggests (love that, PotO!), you can alternatively push a payment via bank bill pay.  Or, if you incur a new charge on the account, you may be able to post more than one payment against that balance in the manner suggested in my first paragraph.

Link to post
Share on other sites
My Amex payment experience is a little at odds with [mention=136067]PotO[/mention] and more consistent with that of [mention=50017]Sidewinder[/mention].  The payment portal will only accept a payment amount up to the current balance.  However, once a enter a payment (scheduled for a future date), it will accept a second payment (again, limited by the current account balance, but not reduced by the existing scheduled payment). 

 

So, trying this on for size, starting with a statement balance of $0, I was able to enter a payment for my current period charges of $845, which I scheduled for my 11/24 due date.  I then went right back in and entered an additional payment of $200 (which I allowed to post immediately, but likely could have scheduled as well).  It was accepted with no problem.

 

The problem I suspect[mention=50017]sidewinder[/mention] is encountering is that the first payment was likely permitted to post and reduce the current account balance prior to the attempt to make an additional payment.  As "Sharky" suggests (love that, PotO!), you can alternatively push a payment via bank bill pay.  Or, if you incur a new charge on the account, you may be able to post more than one payment against that balance in the manner suggested in my first paragraph.

The AmEx website has been a bit poopy lately. I just went and double checked and it will let me make a payment on a card with $0 balance and $0 in pending transactions. I tried both personal cards and biz cards with the same results.

 

2a115031201d486756ebbb6a4def0a03.jpg

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, hdporter said:

My Amex payment experience is a little at odds with @PotO and more consistent with that of @Sidewinder.  The payment portal will only accept a payment amount up to the current balance.  However, once a enter a payment (scheduled for a future date), it will accept a second payment (again, limited by the current account balance, but not reduced by the existing scheduled payment). 

 

So, trying this on for size, starting with a statement balance of $0, I was able to enter a payment for my current period charges of $845, which I scheduled for my 11/24 due date.  I then went right back in and entered an additional payment of $200 (which I allowed to post immediately, but likely could have scheduled as well).  It was accepted with no problem.

 

The problem I suspect @sidewinder is encountering is that the first payment was likely permitted to post and reduce the current account balance prior to the attempt to make an additional payment.  As "Sharky" suggests (love that, PotO!), you can alternatively push a payment via bank bill pay.  Or, if you incur a new charge on the account, you may be able to post more than one payment against that balance in the manner suggested in my first paragraph.

 

Which, is what I said basically. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Many credit cards don't let you pay more than the balance online. You can always mail them a check or use bill pay. That usually works.

 

As far as too many cards reporting a balance hurting your credit score, it's the opposite for me. If few or none are reporting a balance, my score goes down a bit. I'm talking small balances, not huge ones.

 

I wouldn't get to wound up about this, but that's just me.

Edited by Burgerwars
Link to post
Share on other sites
Many credit cards don't let you pay more than the balance online. You can always mail them a check or use bill pay. That usually works.

 

As far as too many cards reporting a balance hurting your credit score, it's the opposite for me. If few or none are reporting a balance, my score goes down a bit. I'm talking small balances, not huge ones.

 

I wouldn't get to wound up about this, but that's just me.

Right. Many won't. But AmEx has never -- for me -- been one of them.

 

I don't know why they let me make payments against a $0 balance with no pending charges, but not others.

 

I can't say that I have ever had my FICO suffer as a result of too many accounts with a balance, but I have seen creditors deny applications for that reason.

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have ALL of the new charges actually posted?  I've had a few occasions where they would not allow me to pay a pending charge...but never had an issue paying the current posted balance (prior statement and new charges) even when those pushed to five figures. 

 

If these are cleared and posted, not pending, charges, then I would chalk it up to a glitch brought about by their crappy IT idiots.

 

If you pay the statement balance in full by the due date, however, there should not be any trailing interest. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, centex said:

Have ALL of the new charges actually posted? [edit: never mind...I see this was not a current in-use card].  I've had a few occasions where they would not allow me to pay a pending charge...but never had an issue paying the current posted balance (prior statement and new charges) even when those pushed to five figures. 

 

If these are cleared and posted, not pending, charges, then I would chalk it up to a glitch brought about by their crappy IT idiots.

 

If you pay the statement balance in full by the due date, however, there should not be any trailing interest. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, PotO said:

Right. Many won't. But AmEx has never -- for me -- been one of them.

 

I don't know why they let me make payments against a $0 balance with no pending charges, but not others.

 

I can't say that I have ever had my FICO suffer as a result of too many accounts with a balance, but I have seen creditors deny applications for that reason.

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

I did my own test right now and you're right. I made a small payment to my American Express Schwab Investor Card. The account had a zero balance and the payment was accepted. After that I used that credit balance to add to my gift card balance on Amazon. I always have a use for that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
HEqSHsK.png

You could probably pay that and then immediately make another payment right after.

The only time AmEx has ever not let me make a payment is when I have a negative balance and when I have a payment that will be posting that same day.

I always make payments using the website, so I don't know if using the app will produce different results.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, PotO said:


You could probably pay that and then immediately make another payment right after.
 

 

And that is consistent with the experience I report in my prior post in this thread.

 

I posted the image only because there were one or more posts here arguing with the OP's contention that he couldn't enter a payment greater than the current balance.  My image supports that.

 

The straightforward advice, in response to the original post, should have been, "you can make an additional payment against your current balance", even if the first payment was PIF, so long as the first payment hasn't posted yet."

 

That's one of the possible hang-ups here ... while you can make multiple payments so long as there's a current balance outstanding, if payments post and there's no longer a positive balance, you can no longer make a payment against anticipated charges that will clear before your statement cuts (until such time as they post).

Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, hdporter said:

 

And that is consistent with the experience I report in my prior post in this thread.

 

I posted the image only because there were one or more posts here arguing with the OP's contention that he couldn't enter a payment greater than the current balance.  My image supports that.

 

The straightforward advice, in response to the original post, should have been, "you can make an additional payment against your current balance", even if the first payment was PIF, so long as the first payment hasn't posted yet."

 

That's one of the possible hang-ups here ... while you can make multiple payments so long as there's a current balance outstanding, if payments post and there's no longer a positive balance, you can no longer make a payment against anticipated charges that will clear before your statement cuts (until such time as they post).

In the example that you gave, however, you had no statement balance to go with current period purchases. 

 

If you had a statement balance of the $667 and had another $133 of current period charges, it would have likely accepted your $800.00 payment...

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, centex said:

In the example that you gave, however, you had no statement balance to go with current period purchases. 

 

If you had a statement balance of the $667 and had another $133 of current period charges, it would have likely accepted your $800.00 payment...

 

Uh yeah ... don't know that I suggested anything other was true.

 

However, using your example, with a current balance of $800, if you anticipated another $100 will post prior to the billing date and wanted to pay against that expectation (which is akin to OP, who wants to pay against expected interest that will post at billing), I believe Amex would only let you enter a single payment of up to the current $800 balance, and no more.

 

But, as has been stated in this thread, so long as there's a current balance, Amex will likely permit you to enter multiple payments against that (even if they, in aggregate, exceed the current balance).  This is the work-around.

Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, hdporter said:

 

Uh yeah ... don't know that I suggested anything other was true.

 

However, using your example, with a current balance of $800, if you anticipated another $100 will post prior to the billing date and wanted to pay against that expectation (which is akin to OP, who wants to pay against expected interest that will post at billing), I believe Amex would only let you enter a single payment of up to the current $800 balance, and no more.

 

But, as has been stated in this thread, so long as there's a current balance, Amex will likely permit you to enter multiple payments against that (even if they, in aggregate, exceed the current balance).  This is the work-around.

Take last month for example...slow month so there was only a few thousand due for the month...however, I also had a few thousand for this month showing when I went to make the payment, plus another few hundred in pending charges.  Because I like my statement report amount to be a nice neat amount, I pay an amount that includes not only last month's amount but also several hundred of this month's purchases.  ALWAYS done that and never had a problem.

 

It isn't about ANTICIPATING anything.  It IS about paying those charges which are actually on the account or that show as pending post. 

 

Same holds true on the revolving products which typically report with a zero balance...it has always permitted me to pay an amount equal to the new charges plus those pending charges.  I have never sought to pay MORE than that amount though since I have no need to close a cycle with a credit balance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, centex said:

Take last month for example...slow month so there was only a few thousand due for the month...however, I also had a few thousand for this month showing when I went to make the payment, plus another few hundred in pending charges.  Because I like my statement report amount to be a nice neat amount, I pay an amount that includes not only last month's amount but also several hundred of this month's purchases.  ALWAYS done that and never had a problem.

 

It isn't about ANTICIPATING anything.  It IS about paying those charges which are actually on the account or that show as pending post. 

 

Same holds true on the revolving products which typically report with a zero balance...it has always permitted me to pay an amount equal to the new charges plus those pending charges.  I have never sought to pay MORE than that amount though since I have no need to close a cycle with a credit balance.

 

It seems that you think I'm addressing something that I'm not. 

 

My reference to an "anticipated" charge is in direct reference to the original post in this thread:  the OP anticipated a finance charge upon statement close and wanted to post a payment that covered the current balance outstanding AND the expected finance charge so as to effect a "0" balance statement.  The OP reports being unable to do this via a single payment, which is consistent with the experience of others.  (I then go on to state the remedy.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, hdporter said:

 

It seems that you think I'm addressing something that I'm not. 

 

My reference to an "anticipated" charge is in direct reference to the original post in this thread:  the OP anticipated a finance charge upon statement close and wanted to post a payment that covered the current balance outstanding AND the expected finance charge so as to effect a "0" balance statement.  The OP reports being unable to do this via a single payment, which is consistent with the experience of others.  (I then go on to state the remedy.)

I would dare opine that OP's statement expressly states that no interest would be accumulated if the full nut is paid by the due date...

Link to post
Share on other sites
 
And that is consistent with the experience I report in my prior post in this thread.
 
I posted the image only because there were one or more posts here arguing with the OP's contention that he couldn't enter a payment greater than the current balance.  My image supports that.
 
The straightforward advice, in response to the original post, should have been, "you can make an additional payment against your current balance", even if the first payment was PIF, so long as the first payment hasn't posted yet."
 
That's one of the possible hang-ups here ... while you can make multiple payments so long as there's a current balance outstanding, if payments post and there's no longer a positive balance, you can no longer make a payment against anticipated charges that will clear before your statement cuts (until such time as they post).

I have made successful AmEx payments under almost every scenario.

I have paid when balance is $0. I have made multiple payments when each time balance was $0. I have made multiple payments when there was only a pending charge. I have made a payment over my current balance.

The *only* time in decades when I was not able to make a payment was when I attempted to make it on the same day as a pending payment was being posted.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites
 
And that is consistent with the experience I report in my prior post in this thread.
 
I posted the image only because there were one or more posts here arguing with the OP's contention that he couldn't enter a payment greater than the current balance.  My image supports that.
 
The straightforward advice, in response to the original post, should have been, "you can make an additional payment against your current balance", even if the first payment was PIF, so long as the first payment hasn't posted yet."
 
That's one of the possible hang-ups here ... while you can make multiple payments so long as there's a current balance outstanding, if payments post and there's no longer a positive balance, you can no longer make a payment against anticipated charges that will clear before your statement cuts (until such time as they post).

I have made successful AmEx payments under almost every scenario.

I have paid when balance is $0. I have made multiple payments when each time balance was $0. I have made multiple payments when there was only a pending charge. I have made a payment over my current balance.

The *only* time in decades when I was not able to make a payment was when I attempted to make it on the same day as a pending payment was being posted.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I played around with this yesterday. My renewal fee hit unexpectedly, which ended up maxing out my card right before the statement cut date. So I needed to take a payment to cover a pending charge and the current balance. I first went on the website and it would only let me pay up to the current balance. I then tried the mobile app instead and it let me pay up the current balance plus the pending charge (minus about 70 cents). I wanted to pay more than that to cover a tip from a restaurant that was not part of the pending charge, but it would not let me do that. I'll have to pay the tip plus the 70 cents after the charge fully posts.

 

spacer.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      183,004
    • Most Online
      2,046

    Newest Member
    dookieblaylock
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Guidelines