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No cellphone; no account access


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I am a 69-year-old disabled woman who has had a Wells Fargo online bank account for more than ten years.  I have an online account because I am disabled.  I still work and I still deposit money in my account.  What I do not have is a cellphone.  At one time, Wells Fargo sent verification codes to my email address.  They are no longer willing to do that.  I have had to use my husband's cell phone number but he is not always available to receive texts.  When confronted with the fact that this was discriminatory, Wells simply said that it was too bad and that I could get a cellphone or be refused service.  Today I was refused service and no longer have access to my account.  I tried to send a wire transfer and received a verification code saying that it was fine.  It was not until I called to ask why it had not been sent that the trouble began.  It was being held because they believed it was fraudulently ordered?  I could not verify my identity via text so that meant that I was trying to fraudulently gain access to my account.  All you have to do is go to the bank, verify your identity and that will take care of it.  I AM DISABLED.  Well, we are sorry but that is your only option.  If I could go to the local branch, I would hardly have spent three hours on the phone today trying to straighten out my online account.  I did make a mistake telling them that the cellphone number was my husband's:  That made them really suspicious.   After several hours of talking to everyone up to an Escalation Manager (who hung up on me when asked what my options were as a disabled person), a note was entered in my file such that I should be denied access to MY account because everyone had a cellphone and, anyone who didn't was definitely suspect.  You had to use your husband's cell?  That is definitely fraudulent.  I now have no access to my account because I can't prove who I am by receiving a text but it is all right that Wells Fargo can't explain what is going to happen to my money.  Not one person I spoke to today offered to help me or work with me:  The stock answer was that they knew it was discriminatory but that they were not going to do anything about it.  No cellphone, no access.  

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Beyond the above suggests, the FDIC has a link to which complaints may be filed.  Arguably there are claims that can be addressed here through the FDIC.  You won't get much more than an acknowledgement that they are looking at it, but rest assured that someone at the Stagecoach will be updating a resume...

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17 hours ago, centex said:

Beyond the above suggests, the FDIC has a link to which complaints may be filed.  Arguably there are claims that can be addressed here through the FDIC.  You won't get much more than an acknowledgement that they are looking at it, but rest assured that someone at the Stagecoach will be updating a resume...

 

The FDIC, really?  I thought that consumer banking complaints were why the CFPB was created.  : /

 

(I also thought that's what these links were for:

https://www.federalreserve.gov/faqs/credit_12666.htm  ( : / )  )

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16 hours ago, Sidewinder said:

 

The FDIC, really?  I thought that consumer banking complaints were why the CFPB was created.  : /

 

(I also thought that's what these links were for:

https://www.federalreserve.gov/faqs/credit_12666.htm  ( : / )  )

FDIC has oversight of the banks and banking operations.  CFPB deals with whiny card holders. 

 

I have had issues which were resolved within a day or two of reaching out to the FDIC through their website.

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On 8/31/2021 at 1:43 PM, UserValerie said:

I am a 69-year-old disabled woman who has had a Wells Fargo online bank account for more than ten years.  I have an online account because I am disabled.  I still work and I still deposit money in my account.  What I do not have is a cellphone.  At one time, Wells Fargo sent verification codes to my email address.  They are no longer willing to do that.  I have had to use my husband's cell phone number but he is not always available to receive texts.  When confronted with the fact that this was discriminatory, Wells simply said that it was too bad and that I could get a cellphone or be refused service.  Today I was refused service and no longer have access to my account.  I tried to send a wire transfer and received a verification code saying that it was fine.  It was not until I called to ask why it had not been sent that the trouble began.  It was being held because they believed it was fraudulently ordered?  I could not verify my identity via text so that meant that I was trying to fraudulently gain access to my account.  All you have to do is go to the bank, verify your identity and that will take care of it.  I AM DISABLED.  Well, we are sorry but that is your only option.  If I could go to the local branch, I would hardly have spent three hours on the phone today trying to straighten out my online account.  I did make a mistake telling them that the cellphone number was my husband's:  That made them really suspicious.   After several hours of talking to everyone up to an Escalation Manager (who hung up on me when asked what my options were as a disabled person), a note was entered in my file such that I should be denied access to MY account because everyone had a cellphone and, anyone who didn't was definitely suspect.  You had to use your husband's cell?  That is definitely fraudulent.  I now have no access to my account because I can't prove who I am by receiving a text but it is all right that Wells Fargo can't explain what is going to happen to my money.  Not one person I spoke to today offered to help me or work with me:  The stock answer was that they knew it was discriminatory but that they were not going to do anything about it.  No cellphone, no access.  

Complain to the the Federal Government for disability discrimination.

https://www.ada.gov/filing_complaint.htm

 

 

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You can turn on voice verification instead if you go into your "Security Center".  It will call you instead and recognize your voice print.  From my WF account:  "To start using Voice Verification, call us at 1-800-869-3557 and say “banker” or press 0."

 

another option which I dont think you will want would be, get them to issue you one of there RSA SecurID® devices:  I have not tried this but I will likely call them up as it looks to be a great 2FA solution.

 

 

Advanced Access is another way we verify your identity. By asking you to input a one-time access code that you receive on your phone or RSA SecurID® device, we help protect your information and prevent unauthorized transactions.

When you’ll need an Advanced Access code

Advanced Access is initiated by Wells Fargo for certain high-risk transactions or events such as:

  • Accessing certain Wells Fargo accounts or services like requesting a replacement credit or debit card
  • Sending money to or receiving money from someone else for the first time

From time to time, you may also be prompted to provide an Advanced Access code when signing onto Wells Fargo Online®.

How Advanced Access works

  1. Upon initiating some transactions, you’ll be prompted to request a verification code
  2. Select the way you'd like to receive the code
  3. Enter and submit the code where indicated
  4. Wells Fargo will verify the code, and if correct, permit you to proceed
Edited by Wander907
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I'll say a couple of things.

 

1. I used to have a credit card with Wells Fargo. I don't deal with them anymore because they thought my account was being fraudulently accessed. Why? I am a man with a higher pitched voice, so they decided that someone must be trying to steal my identity. After I provided them all my information and talked to 4 people, they still wouldn't remove the hold on my account. It was at that point that I closed the account. I was not impressed by how I was treated. I have never had this problem at any other bank. I say change banks, just because it's Wells Fargo and they treat their customers poorly.

 

2. If you are on disability, there are government programs that will provide you with a smartphone for free. I'm not sure of the name, but I do know a couple of people in this situation that have them. It may not be some fancy piece of equipment, but it will cover your basic needs such as 2FA codes and using apps. Just Google it and see what you can find. 

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I am a 69-year-old disabled woman who has had a Wells Fargo online bank account for more than ten years.  I have an online account because I am disabled.  I still work and I still deposit money in my account.  What I do not have is a cellphone.  At one time, Wells Fargo sent verification codes to my email address.  They are no longer willing to do that.  I have had to use my husband's cell phone number but he is not always available to receive texts.  When confronted with the fact that this was discriminatory, Wells simply said that it was too bad and that I could get a cellphone or be refused service.  Today I was refused service and no longer have access to my account.  I tried to send a wire transfer and received a verification code saying that it was fine.  It was not until I called to ask why it had not been sent that the trouble began.  It was being held because they believed it was fraudulently ordered?  I could not verify my identity via text so that meant that I was trying to fraudulently gain access to my account.  All you have to do is go to the bank, verify your identity and that will take care of it.  I AM DISABLED.  Well, we are sorry but that is your only option.  If I could go to the local branch, I would hardly have spent three hours on the phone today trying to straighten out my online account.  I did make a mistake telling them that the cellphone number was my husband's:  That made them really suspicious.   After several hours of talking to everyone up to an Escalation Manager (who hung up on me when asked what my options were as a disabled person), a note was entered in my file such that I should be denied access to MY account because everyone had a cellphone and, anyone who didn't was definitely suspect.  You had to use your husband's cell?  That is definitely fraudulent.  I now have no access to my account because I can't prove who I am by receiving a text but it is all right that Wells Fargo can't explain what is going to happen to my money.  Not one person I spoke to today offered to help me or work with me:  The stock answer was that they knew it was discriminatory but that they were not going to do anything about it.  No cellphone, no access.  

I definitely agree with you. It's already at the point with 2FA that everybody is expected to have an iPhone buried up their butt cheeks 24/7.

Perhaps under the ADA you could fight them,but it will be a long and expensive process. Try seeing what alternative methods they offer such as those little USB tokens.

If you send me a message I can give you the number of a nice lady in the Wells Executive Offices.


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10 hours ago, cv91915 said:

 

Not being able to use a phone is a disability.

 

Not having a phone is a choice.

She never said she didn't have a phone. She said she doesn't have a cell phone. WF really needs to offer better customer service and offer more than one way to authenticate an account. ALL my accounts i.e. social security, credit cards, etc. offer either phone call, text or email for this. This just may be a discrimination case and WF is pretty stupid to not try and accomodate better.

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9 hours ago, StarkRaven$ said:

She never said she didn't have a phone. She said she doesn't have a cell phone. WF really needs to offer better customer service and offer more than one way to authenticate an account. ALL my accounts i.e. social security, credit cards, etc. offer either phone call, text or email for this. This just may be a discrimination case and WF is pretty stupid to not try and accomodate better.

 

Not having a cell phone is a choice.

 

There are several protected classes.  Not having a cell phone isn’t one of them.

 

Capital One has a feature on their site that allows you to see your card number, expiration date and CVV.

 

 I tried to use the feature last night so I could make a Viator purchase for 15% back, but when I tried to have a security code texted to me they refused because they couldn’t validate my phone number (which has been on my account for over 10 years).  The phone is in my employer’s name.

 

should I sue them for discrimination because I I’m gay?

 

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6 hours ago, cv91915 said:

Not having a cell phone is a choice.

Definitely not always true.  When I was traveling in Russia, my cell phone wouldn't work there.  My hotel room didn't even have a phone.  There was no place to buy a phone near my hotel or the meeting I was attending.  When I tried to access my Wells Fargo account, of course they shut me out.  There should definitely be some other way to verify, such as by e-mail, which I did have.  (Wells Fargo sometimes offers verification by e-mail, and sometimes does not.  It seems random to me.)

 

The same thing that would have solved the problem for me would also have solved it for the OP.

 

Modern security only keeps legitimate people from doing legitimate things.  The bad guys still get through.

Edited by nemo
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An 86 year old relative recently lamented that he closed his chase card because chase was no longer willing to send paper statements and was going to require payment be made online. he doesn't use computers, mostly due to bad vision. from his perspective there was no choice.

Edited by hegemony
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Not having a cell phone is a choice.
 
There are several protected classes.  Not having a cell phone isn’t one of them.
 
Capital One has a feature on their site that allows you to see your card number, expiration date and CVV.
 
 I tried to use the feature last night so I could make a Viator purchase for 15% back, but when I tried to have a security code texted to me they refused because they couldn’t validate my phone number (which has been on my account for over 10 years).  The phone is in my employer’s name.
 
should I sue them for discrimination because I I’m gay?
 

You could sue them because you are stupid.

Because CapOne doesn't allow you to see your card number, expiration date and CVC without 2FA is not the same as losing complete access to your account. Also, it seems those bright pink flowers on your jacket may have blinded you. CapOne allows for alternative 2FA authentication methods and not only cell phone. They will, for example, authenticate via e-mail or allow you to call in and answer security questions. BTDT.

OTOH, wHells FartGo is not at all flexible. It would have to take a porch pirate like you to think it's fine to force all account holders to invest in a cell phone and pay a monthly subscription for service just to be able to also conduct basic banking operations. Does it hurt when you think?

There's a reason why wHells FartGo has been around since the days of your ancestors robbing stagecoaches instead of just stealing packages destined for your neighbors and still remain barely #4.

I don't know OP's particular disability, but there are disabilities that would interfere with a person's use of a cell phone. Even if the issue isn't their particular disability, maybe they simply cannot afford one.

The OP can send me or [mention]hegemony [/mention]a message and I'll see she gets the direct line to a nice lady in the WF executive office. And the real executive office, not just the executive customer relations people.


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An 86 year old relative recently lamented that he closed his chase card because chase was no longer willing to send paper statements and was going to require payment be made online. he doesn't use computers, mostly due to bad vision. from his perspective there was no choice.

I need to thank both you and [mention]nemo [/mention]for intelligent insight. It's exceedingly clear you both are not nor ever have been idiot porch pirates in pink-flowered jackets.


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I think reaching out to the EO might be the best course of action at this point. 
 

@cv91915 If you decide to sue Cap1, let me know how it goes. I’ve thought about suing Cap1 because they won’t let me put a pic of Harvey Milk, using a Twinkie on Dan White on my QS card to show the world how conflicted my ideals are. 
 

 

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16 hours ago, hegemony said:

An 86 year old relative recently lamented that he closed his chase card because chase was no longer willing to send paper statements and was going to require payment be made online. he doesn't use computers, mostly due to bad vision. from his perspective there was no choice.

 

That's unfortunate, but he's also going to have a hard time sending money through Venmo using a fax machine or a Walkie Talkie.

 

I'm half kidding.

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I spoke with my contact in WF and specifically mentioned the issue of 2FA and cell phones. She stated that they definitely do have alternatives to using a cell phone, but they may be cumbersome. She also explained that sometimes the front line representatives you speak with may not be very enlightened.

She suggested you contact the EO and they will escalate the issues to her or one of her colleagues. They will solve your issue.

She did say, thought, that one alternative may be having to call and answer security questions or wait for an e-mail the phone representative sends with a security code.

Personally, I would find it very annoying to always have to call. You'd be better off getting one of those AARP cell phones with large texting screens that cost something like $10 a month for unlimited calls and text messages.


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On 9/8/2021 at 1:40 AM, cv91915 said:

 

Not being able to use a phone is a disability.

 

Not having a phone is a choice.

First, not having a phone is not a Choice for some. There are people that do not have the resources to house or feed themselves and I would hardly call not having a phone a choice for them. Actually,  ADA requires access for any one with a disability.  It is called accommodation. As originally posted this is a violation of ADA. Someone later posted that WF gives the option for a voice call, so that likely is their "accommodation." Customers can also go into an office and that is also an accommodation.

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