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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, centex said:

ACR won't get you paper reports and also serves to give an additional 15 days on any dispute. 

Thanks @centex. So the only way is to call the individual bureau's to get them? 

Edited by maverick9
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There is a PDF form on ACR that you can fill out and mail in, and you'll get paper reports in the mail in a matter of days.

 

BUT

 

You still don't want to do that if you plan to dispute from them, for the reason mentioned above.

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9 hours ago, cv91915 said:

There is a PDF form on ACR that you can fill out and mail in, and you'll get paper reports in the mail in a matter of days.

 

BUT

 

You still don't want to do that if you plan to dispute from them, for the reason mentioned above.

 

So if I want paper reports and want to dispute items, the best option is to call them?

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@WhyChat do you know the best way to go about ordering paid credit reports directly from each of the three credit bureaus (TU, EX& EQ)? I tried ordering from one from TU by calling and came up empty. All they offered was a report from annual credit report. CV and Centex do not advise disputing with an ACR because they say it legally gives them 45-days to respond whereas a cr directly from the cra is only 15-days. 

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4 hours ago, cv91915 said:

 

Thanks CV but this is the exact same thread I read and referred to when attempting to purchase a credit report from TU. I called the TU phone # listed in the 9th comment in the thread (800-916-8800) and got no where. Kept directing me to ACR phone number and when I finally got a rep on the phone they promised to send me a TU report but nothing ever arrived AND, they didn't ask for money. I tried this twice on Dec 28, 2020 and three times on Jan 14, 2021. As Centex noted, I'd be leery giving out personal credit report info to a rep over the phone for security reasons, especially now after never receiving anything.

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A written request that simply makes reference to some relatively recent pull on the report should get you what you need.  Phone calls tend to fall in the category of 'we have no record of that' if something goes awry.  If something is worth having, then pay the fifty one cents for a stamp and wait a week...

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3 hours ago, centex said:

A written request that simply makes reference to some relatively recent pull on the report should get you what you need.  Phone calls tend to fall in the category of 'we have no record of that' if something goes awry.  If something is worth having, then pay the fifty one cents for a stamp and wait a week...

I have a full book of stamps already thank you very much.

 

 

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Thank you MarvBear.  I had the addresses, but since my request for the report wasn't due to a denial of credit, I was informed that I would need to pay for the report if I didn't get it through ACR.  I'm fine with paying for them.  I just couldn't find out how much each bureau currently charges for their paper reports.  Googling it returns nothing more than an endless list of ads for websites offering free credit reports and credit monitoring. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, burghdude said:

Thank you MarvBear.  I had the addresses, but since my request for the report wasn't due to a denial of credit, I was informed that I would need to pay for the report if I didn't get it through ACR.  I'm fine with paying for them.  I just couldn't find out how much each bureau currently charges for their paper reports.  Googling it returns nothing more than an endless list of ads for websites offering free credit reports and credit monitoring. 

 

 

They don't know if you were denied or not...and I would venture to say you have at least one soft OR hard pull appearing on your report for the past sixty days.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/10/2021 at 6:30 AM, MarvBear said:

Here are all 3 phones and addresses.  cra address.pdf

Thanks Marv. Right now the collection disappeared off my reports. This is the second time the same collection fell off my reports.

 

It's frustrating because if or when it appears again I haven't been able to complete the first correct step in starting a dispute because I can't get a credit report directly from TU. I don't want to be ridiculed for it by anyone online. I have tried really hard to read as much as I can here to get this accomplished.

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On 5/10/2021 at 2:46 AM, StarkRaven$ said:

@WhyChat do you know the best way to go about ordering paid credit reports directly from each of the three credit bureaus (TU, EX& EQ)? I tried ordering from one from TU by calling and came up empty. All they offered was a report from annual credit report. CV and Centex do not advise disputing with an ACR because they say it legally gives them 45-days to respond whereas a cr directly from the cra is only 15-days. 

 

@StarkRaven$, I'm sure you're citing this info in good faith, but it doesn't pass my sniff test.

 

The ACR facility is merely a conduit to credit reports provided directly by the 3 CRA's and I'm not aware of anything in the FCRA that would distinguish reports obtained via the ACR facility vs directly via the CRA websites.

 

The FCRA provides that the CRA's have 30 days to respond to a consumer report dispute (not 15 days).  In the event that the consumer provides information relevant to the dispute (say, statement copies) rather than just a statement that they dispute a tradeline, the CRA is provided an additional 15 days to investigate and respond (45 days total).

 

Quote

§ 611. Procedure in case of disputed accuracy [15 U.S.C. § 1681i]
(a) Reinvestigations of Disputed Information

 

(1) Reinvestigation Required
(A) In general. Subject to subsection (f), if the completeness or accuracy of any item of information contained in a consumer’s
file at a consumer reporting agency is disputed by the consumer and the consumer notifies the agency directly, or indirectly
through a reseller, of such dispute, the agency shall, free of charge, conduct a reasonable reinvestigation to determine
whether the disputed information is inaccurate and record the current status of the disputed information, or delete the item
from the file in accordance with paragraph (5), before the end of the 30-day period beginning on the date on which the agency
receives the notice of the dispute from the consumer or reseller.

 

(B) Extension of period to reinvestigate. Except as provided in subparagraph (c), the 30-day period described in subparagraph
(A) may be extended for not more than 15 additional days if the consumer reporting agency receives information from the consumer
during that 30-day period that is relevant to the reinvestigation.


(C) Limitations on extension of period to reinvestigate. Subparagraph (B) shall not apply to any reinvestigation in which,
during the 30-day period described in subparagraph (A), the information that is the subject of the reinvestigation is found to
be inaccurate or incomplete or the consumer reporting agency determines that the information cannot be verified.

 

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11 hours ago, hdporter said:

 

@StarkRaven$, I'm sure you're citing this info in good faith, but it doesn't pass my sniff test.

 

The ACR facility is merely a conduit to credit reports provided directly by the 3 CRA's and I'm not aware of anything in the FCRA that would distinguish reports obtained via the ACR facility vs directly via the CRA websites. So do you think it doesn't matter including a credit report from ACR in a dispute as opposed to a credit report obtained directly from one of the three CRA's?

 

The FCRA provides that the CRA's have 30 days to respond to a consumer report dispute (not 15 days).  In the event that the consumer provides information relevant to the dispute (say, statement copies) rather than just a statement that they dispute a tradeline, the CRA is provided an additional 15 days to investigate and respond (45 days total).

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, StarkRaven$ said:

The ACR facility is merely a conduit to credit reports provided directly by the 3 CRA's and I'm not aware of anything in the FCRA that would distinguish reports obtained via the ACR facility vs directly via the CRA websites. So do you think it doesn't matter including a credit report from ACR in a dispute as opposed to a credit report obtained directly from one of the three CRA's?

 

That's how I read the section of the FCRA that I excerpted.  (And I'm not aware of any other regulatory text that's pertinent to this question.)

 

Note that the 30-day response requirement applies even if you enter a dispute to a reseller through whom you've obtained a report.  That really covers all the bases.  However, in the case of ACR, I deem it a "facility", not a reseller.  The reports you obtain via ACR are received directly from the CRA's themselves, so I see no distinction between routing your request through the ACR facility vs entering requests directly at the CRA websites themselves.  (But even if one makes a distinction, the language of the FCRA applies equally in either case.)

 

Further, for the sake of clarification, the key event that extends the dispute reply time frame for a CRA is when you include supplemental documentation to your dispute (such as that necessary to back up a contention).  It's only in this instance that the FCRA permits a 15 day extension to permit adequate time for the CRA to consider that information and factor it into their investigation of the tradeline accuracy.

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CFPB says it's 45 days if you get the report from ACR, otherwise 30.

 

If a credit reporting error is corrected, how long will it take before I find out the results?

 

Consumer reporting agencies have 5 business days after completing an investigation to notify you of the results. Generally, they must investigate the dispute within 30 days of receiving it.
 

However, it has 45 days to investigate if you dispute after receiving your free annual credit report. Also, if you submit additional information relevant to your dispute during the 30-day investigation period, it can extend the investigation period for 15 additional days.

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4 hours ago, cv91915 said:

CFPB says it's 45 days if you get the report from ACR, otherwise 30.

 

 

However, it has 45 days to investigate if you dispute after receiving your free annual credit report. Also, if you submit additional information relevant to your dispute during the 30-day investigation period, it can extend the investigation period for 15 additional days.

 

The information you cite is true of ANY credit report you receive directly from a CRA (not just those obtained via an ACR).  They have 30 to respond.  If you submit additional information for the CRA to review, it extends the permitted investigation period to 45 days.

 

To be concise:  Obtaining an ACR does NOT, in itself, extend the permitted investigation period or response timeline.

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5 hours ago, hdporter said:

 

The information you cite is true of ANY credit report you receive directly from a CRA (not just those obtained via an ACR).  They have 30 to respond.  If you submit additional information for the CRA to review, it extends the permitted investigation period to 45 days.

 

To be concise:  Obtaining an ACR does NOT, in itself, extend the permitted investigation period or response timeline.

 

I'm extremely confused by what you're attempting to clarify.

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Posted (edited)

 

6 hours ago, cv91915 said:

CFPB says it's 45 days if you get the report from ACR, otherwise 30.

 

It's my opinion that the text you've linked from the CFPB is a clumsy, inaccurate representation of the time frame permitted under the FCRACFPB has no authorization to superimpose their own restrictions onto those provided under the FCRA.  The FCRA is the source of the statutory requirement for the CRA's to provide a free annual report, and the FCRA specifies the response time limits against any CRA disputes.

 

 

Edited by hdporter
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On 5/20/2021 at 3:44 AM, hdporter said:

 

To be concise:  Obtaining an ACR does NOT, in itself, extend the permitted investigation period or response timeline.

 

Well, I stumbled over a 2nd CFPB citation citing the same claim that a dispute of info from a free annual credit report extends the response period to 45 days.  And a quick search surfaced the same claim at nolo.com.

 

I'm dubious, but also less confident of my assertion that there's no difference in dispute treatment under the FCRA.  I hope to dig a little deeper to determine where, if anywhere, an extension of response time associated with ACR is statutorily stipulated.  more later ...

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