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What's with all the Crows!


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For the last couple weeks large flocks of crows have been roaming around. Caw, caw. incessantly. From about 8 to 10am and 4 to 6pm you can't step out w/o seeing 10s to hundreds of crows. In somewhat disorganized fashion just flying around, landing here and there on trees and grass. Poking around a bit then taking off and going wherever they go while more take their place. Always cawing up a storm.

 

Not sure what the natural crow predator is but there must be a shortage.

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  • 1 month later...

"A new study that that tries to address that deficit provides some of the best proof yet that ravens, including young birds of just four months of age, have certain types of smarts that are on par with those of adult great apes. The brainy birds performed just as well as chimpanzees and orangutans across a broad array of tasks designed to measure intelligence. “We now have very strong evidence to say that, at least in the tasks we used, ravens are very similar to great apes,” says Pika, lead author of the study. “Across a whole spectrum of cognitive skills, their intelligence is really quite amazing.” The findings, published in Scientific Reports, add to a growing body of evidence indicating that impressive cognitive skills are not solely the domain of primates but occur in certain species across the animal kingdom." ~ Scientific American

 

Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence - Scientific American

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On 12/16/2020 at 3:55 PM, StarkRaven$ said:

"A new study that that tries to address that deficit provides some of the best proof yet that ravens, including young birds of just four months of age, have certain types of smarts that are on par with those of adult great apes. The brainy birds performed just as well as chimpanzees and orangutans across a broad array of tasks designed to measure intelligence. “We now have very strong evidence to say that, at least in the tasks we used, ravens are very similar to great apes,” says Pika, lead author of the study. “Across a whole spectrum of cognitive skills, their intelligence is really quite amazing.” The findings, published in Scientific Reports, add to a growing body of evidence indicating that impressive cognitive skills are not solely the domain of primates but occur in certain species across the animal kingdom." ~ Scientific American

 

Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence - Scientific American

Smart little buggers.

 

Here's a crow study on tool use complexity.

 

2018 research round up | (corvidresearch.blog)

 

Quote

Key findings: All birds passed the initial tool use phase handily.  Given that New Caledonian crows frequently use single element tools in the wild, this was not at all surprising. In the second phase, half of the subjects (four) were able to combine the two elements after no more than two failed attempts. These subjects were then able to transfer this knowledge when presented novel combinable objects. When given a bait box with food presented on the close and far tracks, birds most often only made compound tools when it was necessary, suggesting that they don’t do it just for fun.  In the final phase, only one bird succeeded in making a tool that required more than two elements.  These findings demonstrate that New Caledonian crows are not only on par with what’s know about compound tool use in the great apes, but actually exceed them.

 

 

blog

https://corvidresearch.blog

 

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3 hours ago, cashnocredit said:

Smart little buggers.

 

Here's a crow study on tool use complexity.

 

2018 research round up | (corvidresearch.blog)

 

 

 

blog

https://corvidresearch.blog

 

I did my own little experiment. I started taking the last stale piece of bread and torn it up into pieces and I dispersed them around my front lawn. There were two crows in our eucalyptus tree and they were watching me. I walked away and slowly they landed and ate a couple of pieces and then flew over to the telephone pole making a lot of racket. Soon other crows showed up and they thoughtfully landed slowly to eat. I did this everyday I was home. Then I was away from home for three days and nights working. When I returned home and while still in my car pulling up in front of the house, I noticed crows flying over to the roof and trees close by looking at me. So I repeated giving them some bread crumbs. I realized they recognized me just like the studies reported.

 

It's an ongoing joke with my brother in Colorado about the magpies. They are ubiquitous in Colorado and most residents hate them. They are a novelty to me since there are none where I live. We'll go for a drive looking for moose and I'll say, "Oh look, there's a magpie." My brother retorts, "Where's my gun." LOL!

Edited by StarkRaven$
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  • 4 weeks later...

"Crows almost never breed before they're 2 years old. Most don't leave home to breed until age 4 or 5," he said. "While they wait for a breeding opportunity, most crows help their parents raise young in several ways. They help feed the incubating female, they feed the nestlings and fledglings, they defend the nest and surrounding territory and they stand guard over other family members while they forage."

 

http://www.news.cornell.edu/chronicle/97/4.10.97/crow.html

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6 hours ago, cashnocredit said:

"Crows almost never breed before they're 2 years old. Most don't leave home to breed until age 4 or 5," he said. "While they wait for a breeding opportunity, most crows help their parents raise young in several ways. They help feed the incubating female, they feed the nestlings and fledglings, they defend the nest and surrounding territory and they stand guard over other family members while they forage."

 

http://www.news.cornell.edu/chronicle/97/4.10.97/crow.html

Yeah not surprised. Such smart creatures.

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Years ago I use to volunteer at The Fund for Animals in Ramona. My first day I was given a tour of the medical facility and all of a sudden the lady giving me a tour motioned to me to quickly keep walking to pass a crow perched nearby. She said the crow was bonded to her and extremely territorial and has been known to attach anyone that goes near her 

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Like crows, chimps, and humans, cuttlefish exhibit delayed gratification traits.

 

Cuttlefish Delay Gratification, a Sign of Smarts | The Scientist Magazine® (the-scientist.com)

 

Schnell and her colleagues designed an experiment to test whether cuttlefish could plan ahead, specifically, by resisting the temptation of a tasty treat in exchange for an even tastier one. In a study published March 3 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team found that the invertebrates delayed gratification for up to two minutes or more, a feat on par with chimpanzees and crows. 

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