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Taco Bell will try paying some managers $100,000 a year — but In-N-Out Burger already pays managers $160,000

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Posted (edited)

My first "real job" was working at a company-owned Taco Bell. I lasted for about 1 1/2 years. While I don't know how things are now, I did learn this wasn't a place I wanted a career. Managers were expected to be at the store 6 days a week, about 10 to 12 hours per day. I lost count how many restaurant managers there were for my time at a Northridge, CA location. They didn't last long. Many were fired, the rest quit. A revolving-door.

 

I don't know about manager opportunities at In-N-Out, but one better have a plan B if that is their goal. There are only 301 In-N-Outs in the U.S., and they all, or nearly all, already have managers. From what I read, employees need to work their way up. Who knows how many years, or decades, it will take the lucky few to become a manager. Learn I.T. instead. Enormously more openings with good pay.

 

Edited by Burgerwars

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Retail and food management is a hard NO from me. I have friends who are in those industries and I see how many hours they put in for a measly salary. Everyone talks about teachers, but teachers have it GOOD compared to these people. Guaranteed 3-month vacation on top of every other federal holiday, good benefits, good salary. Now, imagine putting in 80+ hours a week, every week, being open every holiday (except MAYBE Christmas and Thanksgiving), and making a whopping $50-60K for all your time. Not to mention dealing with some of the most thankless and disrespectful customers. Even at $100K, I wouldn't do it. 

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7 hours ago, Bad Doctor Frost said:

Retail and food management is a hard NO from me. I have friends who are in those industries and I see how many hours they put in for a measly salary. Everyone talks about teachers, but teachers have it GOOD compared to these people. Guaranteed 3-month vacation on top of every other federal holiday, good benefits, good salary. Now, imagine putting in 80+ hours a week, every week, being open every holiday (except MAYBE Christmas and Thanksgiving), and making a whopping $50-60K for all your time. Not to mention dealing with some of the most thankless and disrespectful customers. Even at $100K, I wouldn't do it. 

Agree 1000%. To this day, my low-paid Taco Bell job was the job I had the largest quantity of work to do. My title was "lead" and "night supervisor," but that just gets you something like 50 cents more per hour.  I'm paid well now. It's not because I have to be running around non-stop all day, but because of the complexity of what I now do.

 

As far as being an assistant manager or manager at fastfood restaurants, it's a young person's job. If someone thinks they can be standing on their feet running around for 40 years until they retire, maybe they can, but unlikely. I couldn't and wouldn't.

 

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