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QPsi777

Carvana and Used Car Inspection

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Hi – I’m buying a used SUV (2016 Chevy Suburban) through Carvana. They offered me a very competitive rate and their 7 day no questions asked return is attractive to me. My question: I plan to take the truck to have it inspected as soon as it gets delivered. Do you recommend that I take it to a dealership or to a private, certified mechanic? GMs are always plagued with recalls and I get good and bad reviews on the Suburbans but it’s the truck I want.


I find the carfaxes all relatively useless but for one bit of info: the record of who serviced the car last (if available). I found that and contacted the service department of the dealership directly. The rep was good enough to pull up the service history and tell me what they serviced the car for over the four times that it was brought to them for service.


Thanks

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The vehicle may require some specialized tools to check a few items, some vehicles do and some don't. I would take it to a Chevrolet dealership.

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Thanks Marv.


It has $46K miles. Carvana has an extended warranty plan that carries a $50 deductible and looks to be extensive. I’ve read nearly 100 posts and it looks to be credible (I’ve heard all the stories about how fraudulent these plans can be.)


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You can find any open recalls as soon as you know the VIN number. You should do the inspection before closing the deal.

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I live in a State where extended service contracts prices are not negotiable by law. Offhand I don't know if MD treats them the same way. But I would say no to the Carvana service contract. You should be able to go to any GM store and purchase an extended service contract for the automobile. Personal experience with GMPP service contracts, makes me favor them.

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Gotcha; thanks Marv. Great article cv – I was looking at a Range Rover until I read a few horror stories about durability and the cost of repairs.

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Funny story -- replace Range Rover with Mazda CX-7, $6,500 in repairs for $9,100 in repairs and down payment on a Toyota for down payment on a Toyota and that was our situation. Ended up trading in for a 2018 Camry and haven't looked back since.

At < 60,000 miles I blew through $8,000 in OOP repairs in just eight weeks on my last car.

 

I blamed the Germans for that, and bought Japanese this time around. I was able to add a service contract at cost, so I did.

 

The Japanese aren't faring any better at the number or cost of required repairs, but at least it isn't out of my pocket this time around.

 

[Reminder to self: the service contract expires in July]

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Posted (edited)

My latest car is a Chevy Cruze. I have never been a fan of service contracts. 53,000 on it when I bought it, 111,000 miles on it now. $0 out of pocket for repairs. Had a couple minor repairs while under the 100k powertrain warranty (would have been less than 500 a piece had they not been covered). People can trash talk Chevy all they want. I have had good luck with them. I take it to the dealer to get the oil changed. $30 and they provide complimentary sodas, coffees, and donuts.

Edited by spacemule

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