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...some videos on Amazon Prime is what I am trying to do, but I am surprised at how bad the picture quality often gets. I have an iPhone 6S plus with iOS 9.3.3, with Prime Video app version 5.2 installed. Whenever there's motion being depicted, the picture looks no better than you'd find on a late 90's cell phone. There's never any problems with picture quality on Netflix. Is Prime Video a crapplication, or do I not have something set up right?

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Could be your ISP service speed. Video gets downgraded if you don't have enough bandwidth. I use the firestick and works fine here.

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I run Prime on a 4k 55" tv and the picture is fantastic. Cell phone providers, since going to "unlimited" data, have mostly started limiting video quality. I am about ready to drop Verizon--they have 3 different "unlimited" plans and all of their video is limited to dvd quality. In other words, you're not likely to get good video quality over cellular any more, even if you did in the past.

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I watch Amazon videos on mobile apps on my iPad Air and Samsung Galaxy Tab. I notice a lot of degradation in video as well. I notice this more often when I binge watch. Sometimes, the app shows info/notice that the high quality video is not available.

 

I have a good internet connection speed. If I watch on TV using Amazon app for my smart TV, I get buffering/loading icon then video pauses for a long time or until I stop and resume.

 

You can download videos and watch later. But, only some titles are available for download.

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I really doubt that Sprint is the issue here, since I watch a lot of Netflix as well and the picture quality there is consistently, unflaggingly perfect.

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I think Sprint has a partnership with Netflix, right? So they'd prioritize that bandwidth over Amazon video.

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I was experiencing some video interruption on YouTube. A tiny popup, which asked me "Experiencing video interruption?", lead me to this video streaming quality site:

 

https://www.google.com/get/videoqualityreport/

There're troubleshooting instructions here:

https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/3037019?p=video_checklist&visit_id=1-636577227301401311-2063832717&rd=2

 

It may not fix your issues but will show video streaming in your area.

Edited by credit_help

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https://www.howtogeek.com/165481/how-to-test-if-your-isp-is-throttling-your-internet-connection/

 

How to Test if Your ISP is Throttling Your Internet Connection

We’ve all heard the rumors, and even seen occasional evidence. Some Internet service providers slow down certain types of traffic, like BitTorrent traffic. Other ISPs slow down their customers’ connections if they download too much data in a month.

 

But does your ISP do any of this? It’s hard to tell. You have to run various tests to see if anything look unusual.

 

Edited by credit_help

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

 

It's an iPhone 6s plus... but I'm not a big WiFi guy; I have the Unlimited plan so I watch straight over the LTE connection.

 

 

 

(All told, I prefer AppleTalk over everything.)

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

It's an iPhone 6s plus... but I'm not a big WiFi guy; I have the Unlimited plan so I watch straight over the LTE connection.

 

(All told, I prefer AppleTalk over everything.)

So the limitation is the cellular service speed, and you don't test the quality of your cell signal?

 

My guess is a weak cell signal.

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

802.11N has been obsoleted now?

 

How fast is this 802.11AC?

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

802.11N has been obsoleted now?

 

How fast is this 802.11AC?

Not sure what you mean obsoleted. N is still fully supported. AC WiFi introduced in the year 2015. Since 2016, I have not purchased a cell phone, tablet, TV or laptop without WiFi AC. It's been around for a while now.

 

" WiFi is always promoted using 'theoretical' speeds and by this standard 802.11ac is capable of 1300 megabits per second (Mbps) which is the equivalent of 162.5 megabytes per second (MBps). This is 3x faster than the typical 450Mbps speed attributed to 802.11n.Dec 30, 2014"

Edited by Analysis

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Your phone doesn't have Wi-Fi " AC ", does it? If your phone has only the 6 year old Wi-Fi " N", that'd be a start to get it up to speed.

 

What does Ookla's Speedtest say your throughout is on your Wi-Fi connection?

802.11N has been obsoleted now?

 

How fast is this 802.11AC?

Not sure what you mean obsoleted. N is still fully supported. AC WiFi introduced in the year 2015. Since 2016, I have not purchased a cell phone, tablet, TV or laptop without WiFi AC. It's been around for a while now.

 

" WiFi is always promoted using 'theoretical' speeds and by this standard 802.11ac is capable of 1300 megabits per second (Mbps) which is the equivalent of 162.5 megabytes per second (MBps). This is 3x faster than the typical 450Mbps speed attributed to 802.11n.Dec 30, 2014"

 

 

Which, is what I said basically.

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