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The Dining and Food Thread

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On 4/25/2019 at 3:48 PM, cv91915 said:

My hag is on her way back to San Diego from Australia, and I'll be landing there around 7 pm tomorrow.

 

She's been wanting to try Del Frisco's, so we are meeting there for dinner to celebrate her fabulous new job.

 

I was there in November shortly after it opened.  On the scale of high-end chains it was excellent.  

 

0oQANTG.jpg

 

It was too late to get a reservation at The Cowboy Star, or I would have tried to talk her into that.

 

The hag has jet lag so we are going to reschedule.  I've been up since 4:00 a.m. Eastern, so that works for me.

 

I'm going to lobby for The Cowboy Star (or follow @CTSoxFan's advice and finally try Juniper & Ivy.)

 

 

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In the last week I've had sushi in Japan and bibimbap in South Korea.

 

Highly recommend both.

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The Eight Worst Convenience Foods

And I thought nothing could top Hormel’s pickled eggs …

 

8. Meeter’s Kraut Juice (Stokely USA): Yes, that’s sauerkraut juice, which is even worse than it sounds. The taste and smell can be a bit, well, harsh, but KJ is reputed by its fans to have medicinal benefits (as a source of vitamin C, cure for intestinal bugs, etc.), which adds up to a classic case of the cure being worse than the disease.

 

7. Guycan Corned Mutton with Juices Added (Bedessee Imports): The best thing about this Uruguayan canned good is the very pouty-looking sheep on the package label — he seems to be saying, “Go on, eat me already.” The second-best thing is the presence of both “cooked mutton” and “mutton” in the ingredients listing, which would seem to have all the mutton bases covered.

 

6. Armour Pork Brains in Milk Gravy (Dial Corp.): If you’re really looking to clog up those arteries in a hurry, you’ll be pleased to learn that a single serving of pork brains has 1,170 percent of our recommended daily cholesterol intake. All the more ingenious, then, that the label on this product helpfully features a recipe for brains and scrambled eggs.

 

5. Sweet Sue Canned Whole Chicken (Sweet Sue Kitchens, Inc.): From its size (think growth-impaired Cornish hen) to its overall appearance (it’s stewed in a quivering mass of aspic goop), this product may change forever your idea of what constitutes a chicken. Gives new meaning to the old line about meat “falling off the bone.”

 

4. Musk Life Savers (Nestle Confectionery): You may think musk is a scent, but over in Australia, they think it’s a candy flavor. A candy flavor that tastes disturbingly like raw meat, to be precise. But what did you expect from a country where everyone happily consumes Vegemite?

 

3. Blind Robins Smoked Ocean Herring (recently discontinued by Bar Food Products): Possibly the world’s most bizarre prepackaged tavern snack. Interestingly, the product’s titular robin isn’t actually blind, he’s blindfolded — the better, presumably, to avoid looking at these heavily salted herring strips, which look like giant slugs.

 

2. Kylmaenen Reindeer Pate` (Kylmaenen Oy): This Finnish canned good may not be particulary tasty, but at least it answers the age-old question of why Rudolph was so eager for that safe, steady job on Santa’s sleigh team — he didn’t want to end up as a cracker spread.

 

1. Tengu Clam Jerky (Tengu Co.): Nothing you’ve ever consumed can prepare you for the horror that is clam jerky. Still, this product does score a sort of conceptual coup: If you’re the sort who’s always found raw clams too slimy and gelatinous for your taste, these dried, shriveled mollusks will help you dislike clams on a whole new level.

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1 hour ago, creditmaze said:

The Eight Worst Convenience Foods

And I thought nothing could top Hormel’s pickled eggs …

 

8. Meeter’s Kraut Juice (Stokely USA): Yes, that’s sauerkraut juice, which is even worse than it sounds. The taste and smell can be a bit, well, harsh, but KJ is reputed by its fans to have medicinal benefits (as a source of vitamin C, cure for intestinal bugs, etc.), which adds up to a classic case of the cure being worse than the disease.

 

7. Guycan Corned Mutton with Juices Added (Bedessee Imports): The best thing about this Uruguayan canned good is the very pouty-looking sheep on the package label — he seems to be saying, “Go on, eat me already.” The second-best thing is the presence of both “cooked mutton” and “mutton” in the ingredients listing, which would seem to have all the mutton bases covered.

 

6. Armour Pork Brains in Milk Gravy (Dial Corp.): If you’re really looking to clog up those arteries in a hurry, you’ll be pleased to learn that a single serving of pork brains has 1,170 percent of our recommended daily cholesterol intake. All the more ingenious, then, that the label on this product helpfully features a recipe for brains and scrambled eggs.

 

5. Sweet Sue Canned Whole Chicken (Sweet Sue Kitchens, Inc.): From its size (think growth-impaired Cornish hen) to its overall appearance (it’s stewed in a quivering mass of aspic goop), this product may change forever your idea of what constitutes a chicken. Gives new meaning to the old line about meat “falling off the bone.”

 

4. Musk Life Savers (Nestle Confectionery): You may think musk is a scent, but over in Australia, they think it’s a candy flavor. A candy flavor that tastes disturbingly like raw meat, to be precise. But what did you expect from a country where everyone happily consumes Vegemite?

 

3. Blind Robins Smoked Ocean Herring (recently discontinued by Bar Food Products): Possibly the world’s most bizarre prepackaged tavern snack. Interestingly, the product’s titular robin isn’t actually blind, he’s blindfolded — the better, presumably, to avoid looking at these heavily salted herring strips, which look like giant slugs.

 

2. Kylmaenen Reindeer Pate` (Kylmaenen Oy): This Finnish canned good may not be particulary tasty, but at least it answers the age-old question of why Rudolph was so eager for that safe, steady job on Santa’s sleigh team — he didn’t want to end up as a cracker spread.

 

1. Tengu Clam Jerky (Tengu Co.): Nothing you’ve ever consumed can prepare you for the horror that is clam jerky. Still, this product does score a sort of conceptual coup: If you’re the sort who’s always found raw clams too slimy and gelatinous for your taste, these dried, shriveled mollusks will help you dislike clams on a whole new level.

Clam jerky.  :lol: 

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Number 6 is a staple item on the shelves of many southern grocery stores. 

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In an hour from now, it will be all you can eat crab legs from one of the many hog trough buffets here in Myrtle Beach. Hopefully by going to dinner at 3pm, we will avoid most of the people with no manners when eating out.

 

Last night was a wonderful Italian dinner at a mom n pop restaurant. What was sad was the Olive Garden a few miles away had people hanging out the door, waiting on a table.

 

The Red Lobsta being packed here, makes no sense either. I guess some find the fries with clam gravy appetizing. puke.

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2 hours ago, TheVig said:

In an hour from now, it will be all you can eat crab legs from one of the many hog trough buffets here in Myrtle Beach. Hopefully by going to dinner at 3pm, we will avoid most of the people with no manners when eating out.

 

Last night was a wonderful Italian dinner at a mom n pop restaurant. What was sad was the Olive Garden a few miles away had people hanging out the door, waiting on a table.

 

The Red Lobsta being packed here, makes no sense either. I guess some find the fries with clam gravy appetizing. puke.

The beauty of Marketing...just think how many times in the past month you have seen a TV add for OG or RL.

 

I am thankful for those places, it keeps the lowest common denominator out of the places where I would actually go.  As I always say, those with the most knowledge get the best results.  If you are smart enough to avoid those chains and do a small bit of research, you will generally be happy with the outcome.

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15 hours ago, cv91915 said:

Serves 12 and sides are included.  Seems reasonable.

I agree.  I have eaten in many high end places in LV, and ~$100-$150/head for food is not out of line.  In most of the steak houses, you'll be looking at $60-90 for a steak (depending on size/cut), add in the sides and you are right in the ballpark.

 

Whether or not you think it is worth it, totally different conversation.

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On 3/18/2019 at 5:51 PM, cv91915 said:

One of our favorite restaurants has a grilled avocado appetizer that we love (it's the only way I enjoy avocado).

 

They cut the avocado in half, remove the pit, grill the avocado until it's warm, fill the cavity with goat cheese and drizzle it with balsamic vinegar.

 

Simple and exquisite.

 

I have everything in the house except the balsamic vinegar...  and I don't know my vinegar so I have no idea what to buy.

 

Suggestions?

Here is some info on varieties of balsamic vinegar.

 

https://rouxbe.com/tips-techniques/332-how-to-choose-balsamic-vinegar 

 

I stopped at Whole Foods today, but they didn't stock any DOP.  

 

There is a vinegar and oil store in Coronado where you can taste before you buy.  Mom raves about the place.  

 

I will be in San Diego again in about week, and I'll try to stop in.

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15 hours ago, cv91915 said:

Here is some info on varieties of balsamic vinegar.

 

https://rouxbe.com/tips-techniques/332-how-to-choose-balsamic-vinegar 

 

I stopped at Whole Foods today, but they didn't stock any DOP.  

 

There is a vinegar and oil store in Coronado where you can taste before you buy.  Mom raves about the place.  

 

I will be in San Diego again in about week, and I'll try to stop in.

We have one by the office here, and I have been in one in Hawaii previously.  The issue is that I never eat oil & vinegar on it own, so tasting them on their own really doesn't help me any.  I fully understand how the different varieties can influence cooking/recipes, and that is how I would have to experiment.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, CTSoxFan said:

We have one by the office here, and I have been in one in Hawaii previously.  The issue is that I never eat oil & vinegar on it own, so tasting them on their own really doesn't help me any.  I fully understand how the different varieties can influence cooking/recipes, and that is how I would have to experiment.

The idea of dipping bread (or anything else) in oil makes me want to vomit.  I rarely even cook with oil; I find it mostly unnecessary.

 

Good balsamic, on the other hand, is delectable drizzled lightly over certain things*, so I think I can pick one by taste -- and viscosity.  The cheap stuff is sour and really watery.

 

* I am trying to replicate a grilled avocado appetizer we enjoy at a local restaurant.  They halve the avocado, take out the pit, grill the halves flat-side-down, fill the recess with crumbled goat cheese, and then drizzle it with an amazing balsamic vinegar.  They serve it will grilled bread.  I hate avocado that's prepared almost any other way -- but this is spectacular.  

Edited by cv91915

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2 hours ago, cv91915 said:

The idea of dipping bread (or anything else) in oil makes me want to vomit.  I rarely even cook with oil; I find it mostly unnecessary.

 

Good balsamic, on the other hand, is delectable drizzled lightly over certain things*, so I think I can pick one by taste -- and viscosity.  The cheap stuff is sour and really watery.

 

* I am trying to replicate a grilled avocado appetizer we enjoy at a local restaurant.  They halve the avocado, take out the pit, grill the halves flat-side-down, fill the recess with crumbled goat cheese, and then drizzle it with an amazing balsamic vinegar.  They serve it will grilled bread.  I hate avocado that's prepared almost any other way -- but this is spectacular.  

I am the opposite, I love dipping bread in O&V, but it needs to be flavored with other herbs, IMO.  Even really high quality O&V I prefer with herbs, but can do plain.

 

I am with you on avocado.  Not a fan.  I had 3 trees in my back yard in CA, never ate a one, wife had a few, gave away tons.

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On 3/18/2019 at 5:51 PM, cv91915 said:

One of our favorite restaurants has a grilled avocado appetizer that we love (it's the only way I enjoy avocado).

 

They cut the avocado in half, remove the pit, grill the avocado until it's warm, fill the cavity with goat cheese and drizzle it with balsamic vinegar.

 

Simple and exquisite.

 

I have everything in the house except the balsamic vinegar...  and I don't know my vinegar so I have no idea what to buy.

 

Suggestions?

 

On 5/20/2019 at 4:55 PM, cv91915 said:

Here is some info on varieties of balsamic vinegar.

 

https://rouxbe.com/tips-techniques/332-how-to-choose-balsamic-vinegar 

 

I stopped at Whole Foods today, but they didn't stock any DOP.  

 

There is a vinegar and oil store in Coronado where you can taste before you buy.  Mom raves about the place.  

 

I will be in San Diego again in about week, and I'll try to stop in.

 

Before ordering an $80+ bottle of DOP I decided to start with this from Williams-Sonoma:

 

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/vsop-balsamic-vinegar/

 

... currently offered at 20% off with free shipping.  

 

b3WKv3n.jpg

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2 hours ago, cv91915 said:

 

 

Before ordering an $80+ bottle of DOP I decided to start with this from Williams-Sonoma:

 

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/vsop-balsamic-vinegar/

 

... currently offered at 20% off with free shipping.  

 

b3WKv3n.jpg

That offering from Williams Sonoma has a regular spot in our kitchen. A decent go to, without breaking the bank.

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I made this household favorite over the weekend.

 

Used hardcover copies of this outstanding cookbook (one of my all-time favorites) from the early 2000s can be ordered from Alibris starting at $0.99.

 

https://www.alibris.com/Simply-Classic-Junior-League-of-Seattle/book/10929097?qsort=p&matches=72 

 

KRaOmVO.png

 

I omit the cucumber, and substitute sriracha for Tabasco. 

 

I don't usually have dry sherry in the house, so I'll substitute chicken stock or use more coconut milk (you'll have extra anyway).

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My God that looks like it would kill a diabetic on sight alone.  Much too sweet for my morning taste.

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