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Best salaries and how to get them?

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I am a senior software developer - average salary of $135k plus 10-20% bonus... I can tell you - the more you make the MORE you spend. Focus on RETIREMENT... not salary.

 

Yep. I was just looking at the financials of a guy with 400k average income but who has a couple newish car loans and no significant savings. He was looking at trading up his home to one I just put on the market and wanted me to carry some paper because he wouldn't have enough down (I'm listing it at 900k). No dice. Not even close.

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I am a senior software developer - average salary of $135k plus 10-20% bonus... I can tell you - the more you make the MORE you spend. Focus on RETIREMENT... not salary.

 

Yep. I was just looking at the financials of a guy with 400k average income but who has a couple newish car loans and no significant savings. He was looking at trading up his home to one I just put on the market and wanted me to carry some paper because he wouldn't have enough down (I'm listing it at 900k). No dice. Not even close.

LOL. I'd say hard money the guy and you'll get the house back, but SoCal is due for a correction.

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I used to make 6 digit income, I'm slightly under now, but I have 3 kids with medical issues, and hubby is a stay at home dad, so we are a one income family.

 

We were great until the medical issues happened, then I lost my job (laid off). Them we were forced to choose paying our credit cards or paying for physical and occupational therapy for my kids since it wasn't covered in insurance without a diagnosis.

 

Fast forward 4 years, and I'm rebuilding my credit again after burning all my accounts.

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Reading the responses here.

I have a useless degree I obtained 15 years ago.

A huge pile of debt combined with pink ghetto administrative wages makes "go back to school" sound about as easy as "flap your hands and fly to the moon!".

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I've said it before. It's not how much money you make, but how much money you save. That is all that matters.

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I'm in auto sales with a 6 figure income. It's a grind every day and a crap load of hours not the normal 9-5 M-F.

 

The money is always there for anyone that is ready to work hard.

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

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I've said it before. It's not how much money you make, but how much money you save. That is all that matters.

 

 

As cute as that sounds, that isn't all that matters.

 

Unless, of course, you have discovered a way for one to save $50,000 when they only earn $25,000 per year.

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I've said it before. It's not how much money you make, but how much money you save. That is all that matters.

 

 

As cute as that sounds, that isn't all that matters.

 

Unless, of course, you have discovered a way for one to save $50,000 when they only earn $25,000 per year.

 

That solution is easy. But it certainly is difficult in execution. And it takes longer than a couple of years to do.

 

My grandmother who never worked for a living other than being a mother and wife - used to scrimp and save. Coming up through the depression made that a necessity, I suppose. When the depression lifted, she never stopped saving. My grandfather would bring in the money, and she'd sock most of it away in the bank and in the stock market.

 

And forgive the stereotypes - but this is what she shared with me - "There was a Jew who made $20,000 a year and a Greek who made $15,000 a year. At the end of the year, the Jew spent all of his money and the Greek saved $1000. Who made more money?" (Grandmother was Greek. Can you tell?)

 

Obviously, this is a complex thing. And simple at the same time. We all make financial choices. For all I know, the Jew in this anecdote/story bought 15,000 dollars worth of property and would rent it out the next year after refurbishment and come out way ahead. But - the point is still clear. If we spend our money it's gone. Unless you take it back for a refund or resell it - you're not getting that money back.

 

 

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I've said it before. It's not how much money you make, but how much money you save. That is all that matters.

 

 

As cute as that sounds, that isn't all that matters.

 

Unless, of course, you have discovered a way for one to save $50,000 when they only earn $25,000 per year.

 

That solution is easy. But it certainly is difficult in execution. And it takes longer than a couple of years to do.

 

My grandmother who never worked for a living other than being a mother and wife - used to scrimp and save. Coming up through the depression made that a necessity, I suppose. When the depression lifted, she never stopped saving. My grandfather would bring in the money, and she'd sock most of it away in the bank and in the stock market.

 

And forgive the stereotypes - but this is what she shared with me - "There was a Jew who made $20,000 a year and a Greek who made $15,000 a year. At the end of the year, the Jew spent all of his money and the Greek saved $1000. Who made more money?" (Grandmother was Greek. Can you tell?)

 

Obviously, this is a complex thing. And simple at the same time. We all make financial choices. For all I know, the Jew in this anecdote/story bought 15,000 dollars worth of property and would rent it out the next year after refurbishment and come out way ahead. But - the point is still clear. If we spend our money it's gone. Unless you take it back for a refund or resell it - you're not getting that money back.

 

 

 

 

 

Put that way, of course.

 

Money management is a crucial skill. Your grandmother is a wise lady.

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I've said it before. It's not how much money you make, but how much money you save. That is all that matters.

 

 

As cute as that sounds, that isn't all that matters.

 

Unless, of course, you have discovered a way for one to save $50,000 when they only earn $25,000 per year.

 

That solution is easy. But it certainly is difficult in execution. And it takes longer than a couple of years to do.

 

My grandmother who never worked for a living other than being a mother and wife - used to scrimp and save. Coming up through the depression made that a necessity, I suppose. When the depression lifted, she never stopped saving. My grandfather would bring in the money, and she'd sock most of it away in the bank and in the stock market.

 

And forgive the stereotypes - but this is what she shared with me - "There was a Jew who made $20,000 a year and a Greek who made $15,000 a year. At the end of the year, the Jew spent all of his money and the Greek saved $1000. Who made more money?" (Grandmother was Greek. Can you tell?)

 

Obviously, this is a complex thing. And simple at the same time. We all make financial choices. For all I know, the Jew in this anecdote/story bought 15,000 dollars worth of property and would rent it out the next year after refurbishment and come out way ahead. But - the point is still clear. If we spend our money it's gone. Unless you take it back for a refund or resell it - you're not getting that money back.

 

 

 

 

 

Put that way, of course.

 

Money management is a crucial skill. Your grandmother is a wise lady.

 

One of my favorite stories to tell about her - in her declining years at the age of 96, because my parents were taking care of her and had planned to go to Australia for a month - they put her in a hospice, short term.

When I went to visit her, I asked at the front desk where I could find my grandmother. The nurse asked me what her name was, and I told her.

"Oh, that one. Ha!"

 

Me: Um..what'd she do to warrant that expression?

Nurse: "Oh, she's something. She told me if I gave her $5 she'd teach me how to say, "Kiss my A**" in 5 different languages."

 

True story. Always on the look out for ways to make a buck. Even at 96. At that point, she had over half a million in assets. Not bad for an old lady with a 5th grade education who got married at 16 and married a 40 year old owner of a greasy spoon diner.

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