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How Bad Did I Screw-Up With CapOne? [Made a Stupid Typo]


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I have a CapOne QS1 card that is just over three months old. I've been trying to put a big spend on it to get a large CL increase. I've been putting around $100 per day on it and sending then sending CapOne $100-$300 almost every other day.

 

Then last month I opened a new BofA checking account and decided to use it to pay the bill (they threw in a free savings account). On the CapOne site I put in my checking account info and sent in a test $100 payment. Two days later I get an email from BofA saying that my "savings" account is overdrawn. WTF, I have never ever used my savings account.

 

So I look into it and it turns out that I plugged in the account number for my new savings account number from BofA into the payment section of the CapOne portal. In my startup kit from BofA there is a copy of a voided CHECK with my savings account number on a form to use for getting direct deposit. I saw the CHECK and took my account number from it not realizing it was from my savings account and not my checking account.

 

I immediately called CapOne and told them that I had made a typo and they said there was nothing they could do. I never went over my limit with the card, so there are no late payments, overdraft fees, or anything.

 

Anyway, I applied for a CL increase the day after my third statement cut and was denied... The reason was they gave was a that a recent bank payment had been declined.

 

So now my question is... How much damage have I done with CapOne. Will this typo haunt me forever with them?

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Capital one representative suck flowers, they are so clueless most of the time, but oh well, so far they have treated me well

 

what does QS1 mean, is it the quicksilver visa signature or quicksilver mastercard, which is not on the website?

 

I have the quicksilver mastercard

 

It's the QuickSilverOne card. Basically the same thing as a QuickSilver card but with an annual fee. My FICO was around 700 but my credit file was thin and short so I didn't qualify for the standard QuickSilver card.

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You NSF'd a payment to them. It is in their records, and will be so for a while. I dont think there is any way you're going to be able to purge the info from their systems.

 

That's what I was afraid of. What type of database does the NSF go into? I'm assuming (hoping) that other creditors don't see it... or am I wrong?

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On the letter you get that lists multiple reasons for denial, it says that a late payment takes six months to clear for a credit limit increase. Likely, this will take the same amount of time.

 

I can live with that.

 

What's interesting was that there wasn't multiple reasons in the denial letter... just the one.

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Capital one representative suck flowers, they are so clueless most of the time, but oh well, so far they have treated me well

 

what does QS1 mean, is it the quicksilver visa signature or quicksilver mastercard, which is not on the website?

 

I have the quicksilver mastercard

QS1 is the one on the CapOne website that says QS1. QS is the one that says QS on the CapOne website. Is reading really that difficult?

 

What you have is the QS1 for those with credit issues.

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I had somewhat of the same problem with Amex, but in reverse. We had to close one account, because a box of new checks were sent to an address we haven't lived in 12 years. So, we opened another checking account, and left the other account opened to cover checks that would be coming in. After paying all outstanding checks, we would then totally close the account. In the meantime, we had pre-scheduled payments for all of our credit cards. So, I went on all the websites, and set-up for them to take the payments from the new account. The old account BTW, has since been closed.

 

Well, unfortunately, Discover and American express attempted to take money from the old account. They actually did this three times. Apparently, they automatically make three attempts to retrieve the money. Suffice it to say that, even though the money was in the new account, the account we were about to cancel was overdrawn, because of the error on the part of Amex and Discover. To make it short, after 3 days of getting all of the service fees charged by the bank and cards reimbursed, and paying the bill, we were told by both Discover, and American Express that this incident would not affect our relationship with them. Discover kept to its word, as we have received regular credit limit increases.

 

However, that is not the case for American Express. Although we have NEVER been delinquent in paying our bill, Amex has used the one error they made to deny us credit limit increases. They continue to reference the returned check.

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Capital one representative suck flowers, they are so clueless most of the time, but oh well, so far they have treated me well

 

what does QS1 mean, is it the quicksilver visa signature or quicksilver mastercard, which is not on the website?

 

I have the quicksilver mastercard

marigolds often treat their own kind well.

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I paid my quicksilver almost daily too and opened a new checking account. I transposed the numbers on the account and it was declined too. Over a month ago they automatically increased my limit 600.00 dollars so I don't think you have done any damage. I was worried when I did it that they was going to cancel my card.

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  • 5 weeks later...

You NSF'd a payment to them. It is in their records, and will be so for a while. I dont think there is any way you're going to be able to purge the info from their systems.

+1

 

Bouncing a payment is the worst thing you can do when dealing with a creditor.

+1

 

DON'T EVER MIS-TYPE YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT NUMBER.

 

 

I fat-fingered an account number (from a secondary checking acct) on my wife's Amex BCP awhile back.

I've probably typed in routing and account numbers correctly hundreds of times in my life - until this time.

Obviously the payment bounced.

This was a PIF before the statement date - so over 25 days before it would have been "late".

 

I had my wife call them.

Amex didn't care - still an NSF to them.

The BCP was blocked from paying through any linked account for a couple of days, and then back to normal.

Nothing else bad has happened, yet.

 

But from what I've read, I bet this card won't get any CLIs in the near future.

And she's probably on some internal sh!7list of "deadbeat check kiters".

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You NSF'd a payment to them. It is in their records, and will be so for a while. I dont think there is any way you're going to be able to purge the info from their systems.

+1

 

Bouncing a payment is the worst thing you can do when dealing with a creditor.

+1

 

DON'T EVER MIS-TYPE YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT NUMBER.

 

 

I fat-fingered an account number (from a secondary checking acct) on my wife's Amex BCP awhile back.

I've probably typed in routing and account numbers correctly hundreds of times in my life - until this time.

Obviously the payment bounced.

This was a PIF before the statement date - so over 25 days before it would have been "late".

 

I had my wife call them.

Amex didn't care - still an NSF to them.

The BCP was blocked from paying through any linked account for a couple of days, and then back to normal.

Nothing else bad has happened, yet.

 

But from what I've read, I bet this card won't get any CLIs in the near future.

And she's probably on some internal sh!7list of "deadbeat check kiters".

 

 

That's why I always like to push payments in using Bill Pay. If anything goes amiss it won't be seen by the creditor. Over the past 30 years I've had accounts drained by stolen checks, drained by identity theft, an accounts frozen due to bank error and once an account was drained when a computer glitch caused utility company to draft my account every day for a week.

 

I really feel bad for people with dyslexia because their brain will transpose the same numbers over and over. So even entering an account number in twice sometimes doesn't always help.

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You NSF'd a payment to them. It is in their records, and will be so for a while. I dont think there is any way you're going to be able to purge the info from their systems.

 

+1

 

Bouncing a payment is the worst thing you can do when dealing with a creditor.

 

+1

 

DON'T EVER MIS-TYPE YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT NUMBER.

 

 

I fat-fingered an account number (from a secondary checking acct) on my wife's Amex BCP awhile back.

I've probably typed in routing and account numbers correctly hundreds of times in my life - until this time.

Obviously the payment bounced.

This was a PIF before the statement date - so over 25 days before it would have been "late".

 

I had my wife call them.

Amex didn't care - still an NSF to them.

The BCP was blocked from paying through any linked account for a couple of days, and then back to normal.

Nothing else bad has happened, yet.

 

But from what I've read, I bet this card won't get any CLIs in the near future.

And she's probably on some internal sh!7list of "deadbeat check kiters".

That's why I always like to push payments in using Bill Pay. If anything goes amiss it won't be seen by the creditor. Over the past 30 years I've had accounts drained by stolen checks, drained by identity theft, an accounts frozen due to bank error and once an account was drained when a computer glitch caused utility company to draft my account every day for a week.

 

I really feel bad for people with dyslexia because their brain will transpose the same numbers over and over. So even entering an account number in twice sometimes doesn't always help.

That is interesting. I always wondered how someone could end up with the wrong account number when you have to type it in twice.

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I really feel bad for people with dyslexia because their brain will transpose the same numbers over and over. So even entering an account number in twice sometimes doesn't always help.

That is interesting. I always wondered how someone could end up with the wrong account number when you have to type it in twice.

 

I'm not dyslexic. So I went back to the Amex site to figure out how I could have possibly entered the checking account number wrong twice, and identically.

 

Here's what I think I did.

The Amex form allows you to paste the account number in both of the duplicate form boxes.

The checking account was from Chase, which was displayed on the screen as an image that you can't copy.

So I must have retyped the Chase checking account number incorrectly, and then pasted into the Amex form twice as the same inaccurate number.

 

In any event, I hope no one else makes the same mistake. :wave:

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I really feel bad for people with dyslexia because their brain will transpose the same numbers over and over. So even entering an account number in twice sometimes doesn't always help.

 

That is interesting. I always wondered how someone could end up with the wrong account number when you have to type it in twice.

I'm not dyslexic. So I went back to the Amex site to figure out how I could have possibly entered the checking account number wrong twice, and identically.

 

Here's what I think I did.

The Amex form allows you to paste the account number in both of the duplicate form boxes.

The checking account was from Chase, which was displayed on the screen as an image that you can't copy.

So I must have retyped the Chase checking account number incorrectly, and then pasted into the Amex form twice as the same inaccurate number.

 

In any event, I hope no one else makes the same mistake. :wave:

You copy / pasted in your checking account number instead of manually typing it in?

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You copy / pasted in your checking account number instead of manually typing it in?

 

Yes - that's the only way I can figure that I screwed it up twice in the same way.

 

The only reason I can think that the checking number was wrong is that Chase displayed it as an image (rather than text), for security reasons.

So must have typed it once incorrectly, copying from the Chase image, and then pasted the wrong number in the second verification box on the Amex payment page.

 

Anyway - stupid error I hope no one else repeats.

 

 

ETA: I believe I've seen some forms on some other issuer that force you to type the number in, and disable cut and paste. Amex does allow cut and paste on the checking account number form.

Edited by tweak
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You copy / pasted in your checking account number instead of manually typing it in?

 

Yes - that's the only way I can figure that I screwed it up twice in the same way.

 

The only reason I can think that the checking number was wrong is that Chase displayed it as an image (rather than text), for security reasons.

So must have typed it once incorrectly, copying from the Chase image, and then pasted the wrong number in the second verification box on the Amex payment page.

 

Anyway - stupid error I hope no one else repeats.

 

 

ETA: I believe I've seen some forms on some other issuer that force you to type the number in, and disable cut and paste. Amex does allow cut and paste on the checking account number form.

Live and learn.

 

Copy / paste not your friend in these situations it seems.

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Live and learn.

Copy / paste not your friend in these situations it seems.

 

Yes indeed.

 

 

I went back and looked at adding checking accounts for payment on all the credit card sites I have access to:

 

Discover:

- disallows cut and paste

- allows only numeric keyboard input

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Chase:

- disallows cut and paste

- allows any keyboard input

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Amex, Capital One:

- do allow cut and paste

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Citi:

- only single entry of account number

- allows cut and paste

 

 

So Discover and Chase are the safest.

And Citi is the easiest to screw up.

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Live and learn.

 

Copy / paste not your friend in these situations it seems.

 

Yes indeed.

 

 

I went back and looked at adding checking accounts for payment on all the credit card sites I have access to:

 

Discover:

- disallows cut and paste

- allows only numeric keyboard input

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Chase:

- disallows cut and paste

- allows any keyboard input

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Amex, Capital One:

- do allow cut and paste

- duplicate entry of account number

 

Citi:

- only single entry of account number

- allows cut and paste

 

 

So Discover and Chase are the safest.

And Citi is the easiest to screw up.

Shame on Citi!

 

I wonder if they don't want people to screw up so they can collect the fees.

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A shame Cap 1 says it can't do anything. I accidentally pulled $500 to pay a Synch card from my daughter's CU checking rather than mine and it bounced. She pays her own cards and is a college student building credit, but sometimes I help out. Didn't know until she got a letter. I called immediately and explained what happened and re-posted the payment. The rep was very kind and even removed the late fee and said all was good. I'd paid early, so it didn't hit the 30 day mark, thankfully, but was now a week late. Then called the CU to tell them of my error and and all was good. Honest mistakes happen and I'm not sure why some companies can't be more understanding as long as it doesn't repeat.

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A shame Cap 1 says it can't do anything. I accidentally pulled $500 to pay a Synch card from my daughter's CU checking rather than mine and it bounced. She pays her own cards and is a college student building credit, but sometimes I help out. Didn't know until she got a letter. I called immediately and explained what happened and re-posted the payment. The rep was very kind and even removed the late fee and said all was good. I'd paid early, so it didn't hit the 30 day mark, thankfully, but was now a week late. Then called the CU to tell them of my error and and all was good. Honest mistakes happen and I'm not sure why some companies can't be more understanding as long as it doesn't repeat.

Probably most banks would be understanding at the level of waiving fees, but many of them still hold it against you on a risk level. Maybe they feel they can afford to buy everybody's story if the ticket is only $35 (cost of late fee), but not if it can cost them $5,000 (or whatever their credit exposure is).

 

Honest mistakes most certainly do happen. As do dishonest mistakes. While your explanation was of an honest mistake, I'm certain that many people try to paint dishonest mistakes as honest.

Edited by PotO
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