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Common Core Math - I'm for it


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This is the thing. Different people learn in different ways. It seems like common core is taking one way and creating that as the directive - it happens to be a long, drawn out, gratuitous way. This very well may work better for some kids. But let's be real - the normal way of teaching has worked well for the majority of kids for a very, very long time. Most kids don't NEED this longer, drawn out way. So why make it the way everyone has to learn? It's annoying and frustrating, for kids and teachers alike. If a kid needs extra help, get it - but it's just not reasonable and effective to teach to the exceptions.

 

I agree completely.

 

I took calculus in high school and college. I always did very well in math. I could not figure out first grade common core math. Also, why would you take 8 steps to solve a math problem that should take 2? I am always looking for efficient ways to do things, whether at work or at home. This does not make any sense to me. At all.

 

Yeah, I don't understand why they change the whole system for a select few who can't grasp it. I go by the KISS rule: keep it simple, stupid.

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One of the major flaws with it, IMO, is the fact that parents can't help with homework anymore. A few of my teacher friends have shown me some of the CC crap, and it's astonishing. I've never been a fan of public schools before, but now I think they're borderline child abuse. We need to stop catering to the kids on the fringe and focus on what works well as a whole. If a kid needs individual help, it's there in more forms than one. CC is just dragging the good schools down with the rotten ones. Two schools near me have never, ever missed AYP. Until this year, because a "passing" grade was 100%. That's not even realistic.

 

Thank goodness for private schools.

 

ICAN mentioned this as well. I think this is a good point. Parents (those that can and are inclined) are major aids in motivating kids and it helps bonding as well. This is a major issue with CC.

 

As for CC itself being "crap" the only two teachers I know are middle school math teachers and they have a high regard for CC. They also used techniques that are common in CC and subscribed to the NCTM's journal - a big CC supporter. However, while they are public school teachers they were highly educated. One got her undergraduate degree from one of the best UC system universities, the other from a highly regarded private college. They both scored well above the 90% when they took the mandatory CBEST exam required for credentialed teachers in CA. Their enthusiasm for CC is probably not as widely shared.

 

I can say this for sure. These teachers do not view CC as dumbed down curricula.

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I think that's one of its biggest problems, though far from its only one. Parents, I believe, are at least equal to, or maybe more important, than the teachers themselves when it comes to the education of a child. Go to the most inner-city, ghetto, underperforming school in the country and you'll still have SOME kids who do very well. Same teachers. Same classes. But they can succeed. Why? The parent/s. They most likely have a parent or parents who take an interest, who sit down with them and go over their work and make sure it's done.

 

I'm not sure where I was going with that. I got a phone call and my train of thought...well...the caboose came. :lol: I'm sure it'll come back to me in a bit...

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I think that's one of its biggest problems, though far from its only one. Parents, I believe, are at least equal to, or maybe more important, than the teachers themselves when it comes to the education of a child. Go to the most inner-city, ghetto, underperforming school in the country and you'll still have SOME kids who do very well. Same teachers. Same classes. But they can succeed. Why? The parent/s. They most likely have a parent or parents who take an interest, who sit down with them and go over their work and make sure it's done.

 

I'm not sure where I was going with that. I got a phone call and my train of thought...well...the caboose came. :lol: I'm sure it'll come back to me in a bit...

 

Parents are critical. No doubt about it. I have no idea what can be done ......It's a problem with any system.

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I find it bizarre how two usually political, poles are forming in opposition to common core. One thinks it enforces standards that are two hard and that the poor and minorities will suffer and the other thinks it is pabulum designed to dumb down education to the lowest common denominator.

I think it depends on where you are right now. The local district here consistently places in the top 1% of the state. Why change what already works?

OTOH if your district is failing, an alternative approach might be a good idea.

 

Homeschooling will come out of this a bigger force. Either formal or informal. The ways parents have to educate their kids has never been more extensive or powerful. But will they be able to talk to each other afterwards?

 

That's an incorrect stereotype, that homeschooled kids might lack in social development. My two youngest were homeschooled and do just fine with interpersonal relationships. One is now a sales engineer, the other a personal trainer- both jobs rely heavily on 'people skills'. They still have friends outside of school, still hit the skate park, snowboarding hills, little league, hockey.... school isn't the only place to socialize.

I worry more about the kids (and adults..) with their noses buried in their smartphones and facebook 24/7. You can't just "unfriend" a difficult boss IRL.

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Common Core is ridiculous, I for one, want to see it go in a few years. It is stupidity plain and simple. The more they keep dumbing down school, the worse our society is going to get.

 

KISS, BDF you are making sense today..LOL

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I find it bizarre how two usually political, poles are forming in opposition to common core. One thinks it enforces standards that are two hard and that the poor and minorities will suffer and the other thinks it is pabulum designed to dumb down education to the lowest common denominator.

I think it depends on where you are right now. The local district here consistently places in the top 1% of the state. Why change what already works?

OTOH if your district is failing, an alternative approach might be a good idea.

 

Homeschooling will come out of this a bigger force. Either formal or informal. The ways parents have to educate their kids has never been more extensive or powerful. But will they be able to talk to each other afterwards?

 

That's an incorrect stereotype, that homeschooled kids might lack in social development. My two youngest were homeschooled and do just fine with interpersonal relationships. One is now a sales engineer, the other a personal trainer- both jobs rely heavily on 'people skills'. They still have friends outside of school, still hit the skate park, snowboarding hills, little league, hockey.... school isn't the only place to socialize.

I worry more about the kids (and adults..) with their noses buried in their smartphones and facebook 24/7. You can't just "unfriend" a difficult boss IRL.

 

 

My allusion to homeschooling was not about the lack of socialization stereotype. I quite agree the stereotype is baloney. What I meant to convey was that good education was becoming more available over the web at low or free cost to parents that take advantage. It will result in more divergence between those with superior education and those that are stuck with whatever public education they have and whose parents provide little home enrichment.

 

Check out www.ixl.com

This is the future.

 

testimonial page:

http://www.ixl.com/membership/school/testimonials

 

“When I assign an IXL lesson, I can let kids work together because they cannot cheat. Each student has a different problem but the same concept. I love overhearing the students helping each other and working out the solution together.”

Sandy Tignor, 8th grade math teacher, Eureka, California, U.S.A.

 

 

I like this idea, now if we can only keep the teachers from cheating (making corrections on tests after the kids took them) like they did en mass in DC and Atlanta.

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This is the thing. Different people learn in different ways. It seems like common core is taking one way and creating that as the directive - it happens to be a long, drawn out, gratuitous way. This very well may work better for some kids. But let's be real - the normal way of teaching has worked well for the majority of kids for a very, very long time. Most kids don't NEED this longer, drawn out way. So why make it the way everyone has to learn? It's annoying and frustrating, for kids and teachers alike. If a kid needs extra help, get it - but it's just not reasonable and effective to teach to the exceptions.

It goes beyond that. When I was in school, I had a teacher that taught is the definitions of different theorems and how to apply then. We *had* to show all work and keep a binder. In the binder, we had to keep all our homework quizzes tests etc. And we only had a day, after we got our graded assignments back, to correct any wrong answers. The second semester, we had a project in which we had to complete questions ALL by ourselves without any help from each other or the teacher. It was hard, but that's why she taught us everything BEHIND the "this is how you do it"

 

All that to say, her way wasn't even as bad as common core. She did it the "right" way IMO. But common core examples that I've seen, go through convoluted methods of getting to the answer instead of simpler easier methods.

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There are some good arguments against common core but this article isn't one of them.

 

How do you teach kids numbers then addition?

 

Well, I see we have all forgotten how we first learned to add numbers that went over 10, or 20 if you used both fingers and toes. But with the decline of Western Civilization a smaller percentage of Pre-K kids are barefoot these days.

 

You start off counting to three. Then you count higher, to ten then twenty. Along the way you learn to "add" by counting along the number line. For small children counting and adding up to 3 or maybe even 5 is intuitive as they have run across it when playing. When teaching addition of two numbers that will exceed 10 they are first taught to count to 20 then things like adding 1 and 10, then 3 and 10 along a number line (beads were common years ago). After they have learned that, the next step is showing how 6+9 can be treated as (6-1) + (9+1) which turns into 5+10 and provides a very intuitive start to learning the beginnings of arithmetic. And it's key to representing numbers in base 10.

 

This doesn't have much to do with common core. It's pretty typical of how children are introduced to arithmetic and have been for centuries.

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i had no clue what CCM was. i googled and foudn this video.

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/05/137962-common-core-approach-solving-basic-math-problem-doesnt-confuse-congrats/

 

if someone does this in their head to get the problem thats great. but if they are making kids do it this way, thats absurd. but maybe the video isnt right. i hope its not. also we all have our little math tricks we use. and that approach above may work when you dont have pencil and paper

 

for instance 173 minus 146 is not really easy but you take up 4 to 150 and add 23 and get 27 is very easy. so i guess i use a variant of common core for stuff like this?

 

but 32 minus 12, doing anything longer than saying 20 off the bat , as demonstrated in the video, is really nutso

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i had no clue what CCM was. i googled and foudn this video.

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/05/137962-common-core-approach-solving-basic-math-problem-doesnt-confuse-congrats/

 

if someone does this in their head to get the problem thats great. but if they are making kids do it this way, thats absurd. but maybe the video isnt right. i hope its not. also we all have our little math tricks we use. and that approach above may work when you dont have pencil and paper

 

for instance 173 minus 146 is not really easy but you take up 4 to 150 and add 23 and get 27 is very easy. so i guess i use a variant of common core for stuff like this?

 

but 32 minus 12, doing anything longer than saying 20 off the bat , as demonstrated in the video, is really nutso

 

The clown doing the video is acting like this is how kids are normally expected to subtract. It is a misrepresentation for God only knows what reason.

 

The example in the video is not a shortcut for doing subtraction. It is a technique to teach subtraction before kids know what subtraction is. It is done using only addition which is what kids first learn. Basically, you start with the amount you are subtracting and add understandable pieces to it until you reach the value you are subtracting from. You get the answer without having to know your subtraction tables and rules.

 

It is designed to reduce the fear kids have when first encountering subtraction and it also helps develop a more intuitive sense about arithmetic operations which is most important for fixing math relationships in long term memory.

 

Sheesh.

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I look forward to the day public schools are a thing of the past. Sending your kids to one is akin to child abuse. And to think my tax dollars go to fund this BS, it makes me livid.

 

That is happening now. There has never been more access to education material and most of it is a mouse click away. Pretty safe bet concerned parents are taking advantage of this. Homeschooling, while still a major undertaking, has never been easier. The change in how people are educated is happening faster outside of schools and universities, which are saddled with inertial systems and slow changing workforces.

 

It's interesting how things have changed over the year. Fractions used to be much more important. Probably because of the British systems of units and currency which demanded a certain facility with fractions.

 

Did anyone know that the general term for fractions was "Vulgar Fractions?"

 

Here are the 5 categories of "Vulgar Fractions" from 200 years ago

 

Proper Fraction

Improper Fraction

Simple Fraction

Compound Fraction

Mixed number ( like 3 1/2)

 

Not sure why they were called "Vulgar" since only one of them was Improper.

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I look forward to the day public schools are a thing of the past. Sending your kids to one is akin to child abuse. And to think my tax dollars go to fund this BS, it makes me livid.

whatever replaces them will become the new 'public school'. Meet the new boss, same as the old...well you know.

 

Some PS's are very good. Our district here outperforms both it's private and charter competition. That should be the case everywhere, but unfortunately it isn't. Last place we lived homeschooling was the better option. That sort of inconsistency in a taxpayer funded enterprise shouldn't exist

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I look forward to the day public schools are a thing of the past. Sending your kids to one is akin to child abuse. And to think my tax dollars go to fund this BS, it makes me livid.

whatever replaces them will become the new 'public school'. Meet the new boss, same as the old...well you know.

 

Some PS's are very good. Our district here outperforms both it's private and charter competition. That should be the case everywhere, but unfortunately it isn't. Last place we lived homeschooling was the better option. That sort of inconsistency in a taxpayer funded enterprise shouldn't exist

Public school in my neighborhood is incredible, and it's why we live here and pay the ridiculous housing costs we do. There is zero chance I would homeschool.

 

For real, common core math is ridiculous. The teachers in our district agree.

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Why Do Americans Stink at Math?

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/27/magazine/why-do-americans-stink-at-math.html?_r=1

 

Left to their own devices, teachers are once again trying to incorporate new ideas into old scripts, often botching them in the process. One especially nonsensical result stems from the Common Core’s suggestion that students not just find answers but also “illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.” The idea of utilizing arrays of dots makes sense in the hands of a skilled teacher, who can use them to help a student understand how multiplication actually works. For example, a teacher trying to explain multiplication might ask a student to first draw three rows of dots with two dots in each row and then imagine what the picture would look like with three or four or five dots in each row. Guiding the student through the exercise, the teacher could help her see that each march up the times table (3x2, 3x3, 3x4) just means adding another dot per row. But if a teacher doesn’t use the dots to illustrate bigger ideas, they become just another meaningless exercise. Instead of memorizing familiar steps, students now practice even stranger rituals, like drawing dots only to count them or breaking simple addition problems into complicated forms (62+26, for example, must become 60+2+20+6) without understanding why. This can make for even poorer math students. “In the hands of unprepared teachers,” Lampert says, “alternative algorithms are worse than just teaching them standard algorithms.”

 

No wonder parents and some mathematicians denigrate the reforms as “fuzzy math.” In the warped way untrained teachers interpret them, they are fuzzy.

 

 

 

This matches my gf's experience. She was a public middle school math teacher and was quite enamored of the NCMT's (prominent in the article) monthly teacher's journal listing techniques of getting across math concepts in addition to the required drill repetitions. OTOH, her math CBest scores were in the 99% and most of her fellow math teachers just taught the way they always had. The article's comments that there was little supervision or peer review of teaching techniques was exactly what she experienced.

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I wonder if it would be legal to send your child to school whilst wearing a spy camera so you can record everything. Kind of like how more and more people are filming cops these days.

 

I don't have kids, but I do reckon that the education system is pretty adulterated.

 

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