Jump to content

Please consider disabling your adblocker for CreditBoards if you have not already done so.  This site depends on advertising revenue to stay online.


Sign in to follow this  

7 years later, from 530 to 780

The last post in this topic was posted 2245 days ago. 

 

We strongly encourage you to start a new post instead of replying to this one.

Recommended Posts

In my late teens I was out on my own and very troubled. I used to need weekly therapy visits and other various medical services, and though I had insurance through the community college I was going to, I often couldn't pay the copayments. I let the bills stack in a high pile in my living room, and going near them put me into a panic attack.

 

Around 7 years ago I decided enough was enough. I checked my credit reports and found that my scores were in the low 500's, and I had 5-7 collections on each report.

I also had a credit card with a $2k limit, which I had maxed out for car repairs years prior and was only able to make minimum payments on.

 

In addition, I had some delinquencies for a Sallie Mae student loan, who offer zero forbearance options.

 

And then I found creditboards and decided to do something about all of this.

  1. Updated all personal info, removed old info
  2. Opted out of marketing and pre-screening
  3. WhyChat's HIPAA process for removing the medical collections
  4. Waited 2+ years and disputed Sallie Mae lates
  5. Paid off Auto loan with no late payments
  6. Disputed other small non-medical collections like one from Verizon (they barely gave me time to pay an overdue bill one time and went straight to the CA's)
  7. And finally, used my tax return refunds and job raises to pay down the credit card

7 years later, all collections from my reports are gone. All delinquiencies are gone. My credit card debt is zero.

Unfortunately, I have a huge amount of installment history due to my student loans (around $70k total) but they are all in good status.

 

I recently checked my FAKO and FICO scores just to get a general idea.

 

7 years ago: All scores in low 500's

 

After years of certified mailings, phone calls, and research...

 

Jan. 2014, before SallieMae lates removed and CC not paid off

EX: 691, EQ: 730, TU: 673

 

July 2014, all collections and lates removed and CC paid off

EX: 780, EQ: 779, TU: 782

 

My medical debt was the biggest and worst part, I had over a dozen collections. WhyChat's process helped me. Thank you, WhyChat and creditboards!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 years that is a long time.... But congrats either way

 

My brother went from 450 to around 675 within a little over a year. He got to 600 with a year

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last post in this topic was posted 2245 days ago. 

 

We strongly encourage you to start a new post instead of replying to this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By StarkRaven$
      "A California law that took effect Jan. 1 aims to protect consumers from such enormous bills for out-of-network air ambulance services. The measure limits what consumers owe if they’re transported by an air ambulance that’s not part of their insurance network to the amount that they’d be charged if they used an in-network provider. The health plan and the air ambulance provider must then work out payment between themselves.
      But the new law won’t protect consumers like Hoechlin, whose health plan isn’t regulated by the state. Matt’s employer pays its workers’ medical claims directly rather than buying state-regulated insurance, a common arrangement called “self-funding.” Self-funded plans are regulated by the federal government and generally not subject to state health insurance laws.
      In this regard, the new air ambulance law is like laws in California and other states that protect consumers from surprise medical bills: They don’t apply to residents in federally regulated health plans. Those plans cover about two-thirds of people who get insurance through their jobs nationwide." ~ California Healthcare
       
      With an EPO (self funded) insurance plan, balance billing may result for less extravagant but routine procedures such as anesthesiologists, lab work, etc. Even if you are referred to a in-network facility. It happens when say, the anesthesiologist who is out of network, is working in the in-network facility and the EPO doesn't cover the charges. The patient is billed separately and on the hook for the full amount of the out of network physician. HMO's are protected from balance billing CA.
       
      https://californiahealthline.org/news/loopholes-limit-new-california-law-to-guard-against-lofty-air-ambulance-bills/
       
       
    • By BFee317
      Anyone have experience pulling medical collections back from the credit agency and start a payment plan with your HC provider? Or negotiating with a HC provider for items already in collections and paying the HC a negotiated monthly amount or a one time negotiated payment then doing WhyChats system if the items are not removed from collections? The reason I ask is I have over 9 open accounts with Armada Corp (CA) totally over $15,000 and I am looking for the most efficient way to get this removed from my credit report.
       
       
      Thanks,
      BFee
    • By richrod
      Hello, everyone.
       
      For the past week or so, I've been reading up on ways to deal with a CA that recently showed up on my credit report. I stumbled upon Why Chat's HIPAA program, read through it, and while it's quite clear, I just want to make sure it is the right thing for me. I'd also like to use it to ask potential follow up questions along the process.
       
      It showed up on my credit report June 28th, with a Date of First Delinquency of February 20th, 2017. At the moment, it only shows up on Equifax and Experian. It's from a hospital visit in California, and I am from and currently live in Arizona, and while I did have medicaid at the time, I was told that it would probably not cover it, but they'd let me go through with it anyway. 
       
      I started to get bills from the Riverside County Medical department, but I initially ignored them, as I was an unemployed college student, and my mom advised me it wouldn't matter anyway; The bill was for $991. I'm now 23, and have been working hard on my credit score, this is the only blemish on my record, and I would love to get rid of it completely.
       
      I have a few old addresses on my credit report, but they're all from years before this account, and I've lived at my current address for around 11 years now. Do I still have to go through the deletion process for those other addresses? Other than that, I'm thinking my first step would be to fill out and send the "Initial HIPAA Dispute Letter" to the two CRAs that show the collection, is this correct?
       
      Thanks in advance for any help!
       
    • By lola2020
      I am working on cleaning up a few items on my credit reports and not sure which way to start.  There are two Paid Collection medical bills showing on my reports, which is hurting my ability to rebuild my credit after divorce.  They both are being reported by the same medical collection agency that is a local company where I live.  They are both old, but still have a couple years to fall off my reports.  One for $73 has a delinquency date of 3/2015, assigned to collections 1/2016, paid in full 7/2016.  Last reported to credit bureaus on 6/2017,    The other one for $164 has a delinquency date of 5/27/15, assigned to collections 10/2016, paid in full 12/2016 and was last reported on May 18, 2020.  Should I call them and request a goodwill adjustment to have them remove the reporting, write a goodwill letter, or move to the HIPAA letter?  
       
      I also have one account in collection status that I disagree with.  I had disputed it via the credit bureaus, but only got a notation in the credit reports that the debt was conforming, which I am sure means they contacted the collector and they said I owed the debt.  This is a credit card debt that appears to be sold to a collection agency.  The debt amount is $370, delinquency date 12/2018, turned to collection 6/2019.  I am not even sure what this is, but may just be continual late fee charges on account I though was closed.  Where should I start with this one?  Pay for delete or validation letter?
       
      I made the mistake of ignoring my credit report after divorce in 2016 and have a thin file, but these three things are seriously hurting my ability to get a credit card acceptance.  I don't want to keep having hard credit pulls for applications when I know these items are a big reason why I am being turned down.
       
      Thanks for letting me tell my story.
      Lola2020
    • By Shareh
      After lurking in the shadows for a little while now, I decided I wanted to try why chat's guidebook on medical collections but felt really noobish once I didnt understand how to appropriately send priority mail. 
       
      It says send a letter to the CRA with the proof of delivery number. Whats the delivery number? Is it on the forms Im getting from the post office?
       
      Also, on the priority mail instructions, It says to affix the copy to the top of the hard copy of the letter. Does that mean staple it on the top so I dont lose it?
       
      I promise you I am not as noobish as I seem. I guess I am kind of nervous?
       
      Thanks
       
       



  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      179,444
    • Most Online
      2,046

    Newest Member
    Witchdoctorsix
    Joined

About Us

Since 2003, creditboards.com has helped thousands of people repair their credit, force abusive collection agents to follow the law, ensure proper reporting by credit reporting agencies, and provided financial education to help avoid the pitfalls that can lead to negative tradelines.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Guidelines