Jump to content

A year later with Capital One secured credit card: How do I get my $1000 back?


gozu
 Share

The last post in this topic was posted 3659 days ago. 

 

We strongly encourage you to start a new post instead of replying to this one.

Recommended Posts

Nonsense, it's simple math and "looking at it differently" won't change the numbers. We are talking about $1000, not 100k.

 

 

 

Aside from that, you would be a fool to put your last $1000 into risky high yield investments. You need a safe, liquid emergency fund and you just have to live with the fact that it's not going to yield much. An insured savings account is a good place for part of it. And don't say it's not liquid. It's instantly available via the CL on the secured card, and available within a few weeks by closing the card. If the rest of your emergency fund won't last a few weeks the extra $1000 is moot anyway.

 

 

You misunderstood what I wrote. Never did I say you could turn $1,000 into a huge investment.

 

You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away. I believe you and everyone here understands the power of interest and how it can work for you. You put away $X / month, live a bit more frugal and look for opportunities like this one at each and every turn to save, save save. Did you not read my entire post, and the bit about retiring early? Let the snowball work for you.

 

I never said one thing about high-risk investments.

 

You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!! Credit should be used to front the costs of expenses but if you can't pay the entire balance next month, you can't afford it. Never, ever, ever pay interest on a credit card, that is antithesis of saving! Exception is if you have a real emergency but thats what an emergency fund is for.

 

Credit should be looked at as something that is not yours. You are getting 0% in return from it, the creditor is the one that is making money off you! (If you pay 100% the statement balance each and every month, 100% of the time for 100% of your cards and earn rewards, then you are getting some sort of return). Credit is a safety net, not liquid asset - it may be defined as one in ECON 101 class somewhere, but if you look at it that way, you are horribly mismanaging your money.

 

1. Pay off all debts

2. Emergency fund sitting in high yield savings account, 6 months minimum if possible

3. Max out employer 401k up to employer match (this can be done at same time as #2)

4. Max out Roth IRA (and HSA if you have one available)

5. Max out remaining 401k

6. Invest in taxable brokerage account (there are many conservative index funds and ones with more risk involved) - and other investments (I've been funding P2P loans, a small portion of my retirement is there, currently getting 13%)

 

If you have the discipline and willpower to do the above you will have a nice retirement and most likely will retire before 65. Or you could worry about having an 850 credit score at age 65 and be nervously looking at social security statements wondering how you're going to get by in 10 years, but at least you have that $300k available credit to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


 

 

Nonsense, it's simple math and "looking at it differently" won't change the numbers. We are talking about $1000, not 100k.

 

 

 

 

Aside from that, you would be a fool to put your last $1000 into risky high yield investments. You need a safe, liquid emergency fund and you just have to live with the fact that it's not going to yield much. An insured savings account is a good place for part of it. And don't say it's not liquid. It's instantly available via the CL on the secured card, and available within a few weeks by closing the card. If the rest of your emergency fund won't last a few weeks the extra $1000 is moot anyway.

 

You misunderstood what I wrote. Never did I say you could turn $1,000 into a huge investment.

 

You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away. I believe you and everyone here understands the power of interest and how it can work for you. You put away $X / month, live a bit more frugal and look for opportunities like this one at each and every turn to save, save save. Did you not read my entire post, and the bit about retiring early? Let the snowball work for you.

 

I never said one thing about high-risk investments.

 

You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!! Credit should be used to front the costs of expenses but if you can't pay the entire balance next month, you can't afford it. Never, ever, ever pay interest on a credit card, that is antithesis of saving! Exception is if you have a real emergency but thats what an emergency fund is for.

 

Credit should be looked at as something that is not yours. You are getting 0% in return from it, the creditor is the one that is making money off you! (If you pay 100% the statement balance each and every month, 100% of the time for 100% of your cards and earn rewards, then you are getting some sort of return). Credit is a safety net, not liquid asset - it may be defined as one in ECON 101 class somewhere, but if you look at it that way, you are horribly mismanaging your money.

 

1. Pay off all debts

2. Emergency fund sitting in high yield savings account, 6 months minimum if possible

3. Max out employer 401k up to employer match (this can be done at same time as #2)

4. Max out Roth IRA (and HSA if you have one available)

5. Max out remaining 401k

6. Invest in taxable brokerage account (there are many conservative index funds and ones with more risk involved) - and other investments (I've been funding P2P loans, a small portion of my retirement is there, currently getting 13%)

 

If you have the discipline and willpower to do the above you will have a nice retirement and most likely will retire before 65. Or you could worry about having an 850 credit score at age 65 and be nervously looking at social security statements wondering how you're going to get by in 10 years, but at least you have that $300k available credit to you.

CB generally encourages people to not pay a penny of interest, so rewards cards do pay. Leaving $1000 in a secured card for another year will help building credit long term. Not having good credit costs a lot of money, probably much more than what you would earn investing $1000 over a year's time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Nonsense, it's simple math and "looking at it differently" won't change the numbers. We are talking about $1000, not 100k.

 

 

 

 

Aside from that, you would be a fool to put your last $1000 into risky high yield investments. You need a safe, liquid emergency fund and you just have to live with the fact that it's not going to yield much. An insured savings account is a good place for part of it. And don't say it's not liquid. It's instantly available via the CL on the secured card, and available within a few weeks by closing the card. If the rest of your emergency fund won't last a few weeks the extra $1000 is moot anyway.

 

You misunderstood what I wrote. Never did I say you could turn $1,000 into a huge investment.

 

You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away. I believe you and everyone here understands the power of interest and how it can work for you. You put away $X / month, live a bit more frugal and look for opportunities like this one at each and every turn to save, save save. Did you not read my entire post, and the bit about retiring early? Let the snowball work for you.

 

I never said one thing about high-risk investments.

 

You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!! Credit should be used to front the costs of expenses but if you can't pay the entire balance next month, you can't afford it. Never, ever, ever pay interest on a credit card, that is antithesis of saving! Exception is if you have a real emergency but thats what an emergency fund is for.

 

Credit should be looked at as something that is not yours. You are getting 0% in return from it, the creditor is the one that is making money off you! (If you pay 100% the statement balance each and every month, 100% of the time for 100% of your cards and earn rewards, then you are getting some sort of return). Credit is a safety net, not liquid asset - it may be defined as one in ECON 101 class somewhere, but if you look at it that way, you are horribly mismanaging your money.

 

1. Pay off all debts

2. Emergency fund sitting in high yield savings account, 6 months minimum if possible

3. Max out employer 401k up to employer match (this can be done at same time as #2)

4. Max out Roth IRA (and HSA if you have one available)

5. Max out remaining 401k

6. Invest in taxable brokerage account (there are many conservative index funds and ones with more risk involved) - and other investments (I've been funding P2P loans, a small portion of my retirement is there, currently getting 13%)

 

If you have the discipline and willpower to do the above you will have a nice retirement and most likely will retire before 65. Or you could worry about having an 850 credit score at age 65 and be nervously looking at social security statements wondering how you're going to get by in 10 years, but at least you have that $300k available credit to you.

CB generally encourages people to not pay a penny of interest, so rewards cards do pay. Leaving $1000 in a secured card for another year will help building credit long term. Not having good credit costs a lot of money, probably much more than what you would earn investing $1000 over a year's time.

 

Umm, hehe. This is kind of offtopic ;) though I greatly appreciate your time and effort to provide me with sound guidance. Thank you again!

 

I already said a while ago that I was going to keep the secured card for another couple of years at least. I don't need the $1000, I was just under the mistaken impression that it was possible to convert the secured card to unsecured after a year. That's all.

 

Now, the question that I have is, if I'm supposed to apply for 2 credit cards right now, one being the walmart card, which should the second one be? I have very little knowledge about credit card issuers*

 

 

*except for the fact that Amex and Discover seem to be less evil to customers than the rest. In fact, when I defaulted on my Discover card, they did not try to screw me with crazy fees and percentages. 2 years later, the balance was still very reasonable and I HAPPILY paid off the full amount.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CB generally encourages people to not pay a penny of interest, so rewards cards do pay. Leaving $1000 in a secured card for another year will help building credit long term. Not having good credit costs a lot of money, probably much more than what you would earn investing $1000 over a year's time.

 

I understand what you're getting at but the OP has an Amex, how much extra interest rate would he have to pay with his current score compared to what it will be in a year with that card still open and in a year with that card being closed tomorrow is the question. Is he buying a house or a car in the next year?

 

Don't look at the $1,000 a $1,000 investment, everyone is misunderstanding this. You'd rather want to earn say 10% on 100k instead of 1k right? How do you get there? You use opportunities like these, grabbing that free 1k and stashing into the interest bearing pile ASAP (and then find ways to add as much as possible wherever and whenever)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Nonsense, it's simple math and "looking at it differently" won't change the numbers. We are talking about $1000, not 100k.

 

 

 

 

Aside from that, you would be a fool to put your last $1000 into risky high yield investments. You need a safe, liquid emergency fund and you just have to live with the fact that it's not going to yield much. An insured savings account is a good place for part of it. And don't say it's not liquid. It's instantly available via the CL on the secured card, and available within a few weeks by closing the card. If the rest of your emergency fund won't last a few weeks the extra $1000 is moot anyway.

 

You misunderstood what I wrote. Never did I say you could turn $1,000 into a huge investment.

 

You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away. I believe you and everyone here understands the power of interest and how it can work for you. You put away $X / month, live a bit more frugal and look for opportunities like this one at each and every turn to save, save save. Did you not read my entire post, and the bit about retiring early? Let the snowball work for you.

 

I never said one thing about high-risk investments.

 

You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!! Credit should be used to front the costs of expenses but if you can't pay the entire balance next month, you can't afford it. Never, ever, ever pay interest on a credit card, that is antithesis of saving! Exception is if you have a real emergency but thats what an emergency fund is for.

 

Credit should be looked at as something that is not yours. You are getting 0% in return from it, the creditor is the one that is making money off you! (If you pay 100% the statement balance each and every month, 100% of the time for 100% of your cards and earn rewards, then you are getting some sort of return). Credit is a safety net, not liquid asset - it may be defined as one in ECON 101 class somewhere, but if you look at it that way, you are horribly mismanaging your money.

 

1. Pay off all debts

2. Emergency fund sitting in high yield savings account, 6 months minimum if possible

3. Max out employer 401k up to employer match (this can be done at same time as #2)

4. Max out Roth IRA (and HSA if you have one available)

5. Max out remaining 401k

6. Invest in taxable brokerage account (there are many conservative index funds and ones with more risk involved) - and other investments (I've been funding P2P loans, a small portion of my retirement is there, currently getting 13%)

 

If you have the discipline and willpower to do the above you will have a nice retirement and most likely will retire before 65. Or you could worry about having an 850 credit score at age 65 and be nervously looking at social security statements wondering how you're going to get by in 10 years, but at least you have that $300k available credit to you.

CB generally encourages people to not pay a penny of interest, so rewards cards do pay. Leaving $1000 in a secured card for another year will help building credit long term. Not having good credit costs a lot of money, probably much more than what you would earn investing $1000 over a year's time.

Umm, hehe. This is kind of offtopic ;) though I greatly appreciate your time and effort to provide me with sound guidance. Thank you again!

 

I already said a while ago that I was going to keep the secured card for another couple of years at least. I don't need the $1000, I was just under the mistaken impression that it was possible to convert the secured card to unsecured after a year. That's all.

 

Now, the question that I have is, if I'm supposed to apply for 2 credit cards right now, one being the walmart card, which should the second one be? I have very little knowledge about credit card issuers*

 

 

*except for the fact that Amex and Discover seem to be less evil to customers than the rest. In fact, when I defaulted on my Discover card, they did not try to screw me with crazy fees and percentages. 2 years later, the balance was still very reasonable and I HAPPILY paid off the full amount.

You might try for a CU card. They tend to be more generous with limits in general with less than perfect credit, and a higher limit would be a great stepping stone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Nonsense, it's simple math and "looking at it differently" won't change the numbers. We are talking about $1000, not 100k.

 

 

 

Aside from that, you would be a fool to put your last $1000 into risky high yield investments. You need a safe, liquid emergency fund and you just have to live with the fact that it's not going to yield much. An insured savings account is a good place for part of it. And don't say it's not liquid. It's instantly available via the CL on the secured card, and available within a few weeks by closing the card. If the rest of your emergency fund won't last a few weeks the extra $1000 is moot anyway.

 

 

You misunderstood what I wrote. Never did I say you could turn $1,000 into a huge investment.

 

You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away. I believe you and everyone here understands the power of interest and how it can work for you. You put away $X / month, live a bit more frugal and look for opportunities like this one at each and every turn to save, save save. Did you not read my entire post, and the bit about retiring early? Let the snowball work for you.

 

I never said one thing about high-risk investments.

 

You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!! Credit should be used to front the costs of expenses but if you can't pay the entire balance next month, you can't afford it. Never, ever, ever pay interest on a credit card, that is antithesis of saving! Exception is if you have a real emergency but thats what an emergency fund is for.

 

Credit should be looked at as something that is not yours. You are getting 0% in return from it, the creditor is the one that is making money off you! (If you pay 100% the statement balance each and every month, 100% of the time for 100% of your cards and earn rewards, then you are getting some sort of return). Credit is a safety net, not liquid asset - it may be defined as one in ECON 101 class somewhere, but if you look at it that way, you are horribly mismanaging your money.

 

1. Pay off all debts

2. Emergency fund sitting in high yield savings account, 6 months minimum if possible

3. Max out employer 401k up to employer match (this can be done at same time as #2)

4. Max out Roth IRA (and HSA if you have one available)

5. Max out remaining 401k

6. Invest in taxable brokerage account (there are many conservative index funds and ones with more risk involved) - and other investments (I've been funding P2P loans, a small portion of my retirement is there, currently getting 13%)

 

If you have the discipline and willpower to do the above you will have a nice retirement and most likely will retire before 65. Or you could worry about having an 850 credit score at age 65 and be nervously looking at social security statements wondering how you're going to get by in 10 years, but at least you have that $300k available credit to you.

 

"You should be more concerned about saving and putting away money, looking at that $1,000 as another stash of money to throw onto the already existing pile tucked away."

Umm, how is $1000 in a savings account not part of the existing pile tucked away? In your earlier post you said you cringed to see it tucked away rather than... well, you still haven't actually told us.

 

Now you add, "I never said one thing about high-risk investments."

And yet you cringe at the idea of leaving $1000 in an insured savings account. Please fill us in on the high-yield, low-risk investment you advocate instead.

 

"You are a fool if you look at available credit as a liquid asset. That is just non-sense!!"

Obviously. It is also a non sequitur.

 

"You are getting 0% in return from it [credit]".

Only if you are using it incorrectly. You might want to Google "leverage" and "arbitrage". :grin: Aside from that, the CCs I use provide interest free loans and at least 2% cash back on everything I spend, plus valuable purchaser protections. According to my math, that adds up to more than 0%.

 

"...the creditor is the one that is making money off you!"

It is not a zero-sum game. Normally both parties expect to profit, otherwise there would be no market for credit. How many successful entrepreneurs can you name who didn't start with borrowed money?

 

"Credit is a safety net"

No. That is only one potential, minor use of credit. But you're partly right because CCs normally provide a interest-free loans for about 30-50 days. That gives you a bit of extra time to access your emergency funds, so they don't need to be quite so liquid. It also means you get to earn cash back as you dole the funds out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Umm, how is $1000 in a savings account not part of the existing pile tucked away? In your earlier post you said you cringed to see it tucked away rather than... well, you still haven't actually told us."

 

You still don't understand what I have been saying. Why let Cap One sit on $1,000 at some deplorable CD rate when you could take that $1,000 and put it with another investment that is getting compound interest. It could be a liquid savings account that won't earn much but is part of an emergency fund, it could be in an IRA, Lending Club, a money market, any of one of things, when lumped with whatever previous funds it will snowball and compound, you are missing out on that. Get it? Just like compound interest works against you, it works for you.

 

"Now you add, "I never said one thing about high-risk investments."

And yet you cringe at the idea of leaving $1000 in an insured savings account. Please fill us in on the high-yield, low-risk investment you advocate instead."

Again, you misunderstood, see my above response. But let me add another example I used in either this thread or a similar one tonight: Would you rather earn 10% on 1k or 100k? How do you get to that 100k? You put money there, over time. Monthly and one-offs such as OPs $1k it all adds up. Read this for some insight: he and his wife retired at the age of 30 without hitting the lotto, inheritance, crazy risky investments that paid off, just sound investments and living well within their means, scooping up $1,000 deposits and whatever else and lumping them together. It is not high risk, high yield. It is sound spending habits, leveraging rewards and living well within their means. By not spending and making normal investments as defined in my previous post that you apparently missed, you'll be golden for your retirement.

"Only if you are using it incorrectly. You might want to Google "leverage" and "arbitrage". :grin: Aside from that, the CCs I use provide interest free loans and at least 2% cash back on everything I spend, plus valuable purchaser protections. According to my math, that adds up to more than 0%."

Please re-read my post. I clearly stated you get some sort of return for paying off in full, on-time, and getting rewards. Google 'manufactured spending', this is something I and my SO does and we get crazy amounts of miles with very little work. (buying $5k in gift cards once a month on each of our cards and transferring the balances around to pay it off).

"No. That is only one potential, minor use of credit. But you're partly right because CCs normally provide a interest-free loans for about 30-50 days. That gives you a bit of extra time to access your emergency funds, so they don't need to be quite so liquid. It also means you get to earn cash back as you dole the funds out."

If credit is not a financial safety net, please explain what is. I am 100% right. You get an interest free loan during the grace period to cover unexpected expenses and other hardships/emergencies. Ideally you have an emergency fund in addition to cover times where you lose income (lose your job).

I am unaware of any credit card that a 720 score that won't get you (barring too many recent inquires or something similar). And I'm pretty sure at 720 you'll get the same rates on a mortgage or vehicle as someone with 850 would. If you want 100 cards and 500k credit, go for it. Just get to 720 and you'll get the best interest rates and you'll get the best rewards, you're not missing out on anything else. If you enjoy the process of collecting these, great. But missing out on free money that could be added to a compounding snowball of cash in order to try raise your credit card sooner doesn't make overall financial sense. I may be in the minority on this board but I think any financial adviser would agree with me.

But re-read above where I post that if he is going to buy a house soon I would concede that because his score likely doesnt qualify him for optimal prime rates.

Also check out the link I posted and really try to read it. It explains better than I can why leaving $1,000 of your hard earned money just sitting there not working for you (again, this is not a single $1,000 investment, but $11,000 gains more interest than $10,000 each month, but way less than $50k, which is less than $51k. It all adds up.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gozu, I think you should accept the pre-approval and also add a Walmart card.

 

Dockworker, now I understand what you meant to say. You are recommending we throw out the math and substitute magical thinking. That way we can retire early.

 

I'm going to stick with the math. :grin:

 

You also asked me to explain what credit is. Here is a reasonably good definition:

1. A contractual agreement in which a borrower receives something of value now and agrees to repay the lender at some date in the future, generally with interest. The term also refers to the borrowing capacity of an individual or company.

2. An accounting entry that either decreases assets or increases liabilities and equity on the company's balance sheet. On the company's income statement, a debit will reduce net income, while a credit will increase net income.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gozu, I think you should accept the pre-approval and also add a Walmart card.

 

 

Thank you. It is done. The CapOne platinum card gave me a $3k limit (twice that of my secured card) and Walmart will get back to me within 7-10 days by mail.

 

Question: do they actually verify your income and or rent ? I make 85k and pay $1600 in rent and I'm wondering if it's holding me back and what formula they'd use to derive a credit limit from this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Gozu, I think you should accept the pre-approval and also add a Walmart card.

 

 

Thank you. It is done. The CapOne platinum card gave me a $3k limit (twice that of my secured card) and Walmart will get back to me within 7-10 days by mail.

 

Question: do they actually verify your income and or rent ? I make 85k and pay $1600 in rent and I'm wondering if it's holding me back and what formula they'd use to derive a credit limit from this.

 

Very unlikely, and 85k won't hold you back anytime soon. Many CB members have credit lines totaling multiples of their annual income.

 

Within reason, FICO scores and your history with the lender in question are WAY more important than income.

 

Congrats on the CapOne! :good: You have a very good chance of getting that converted to a no-AF, 1.5% cash back Quicksilver in a year or two.

 

You might want to phone GECRB/Walmart Monday - at least that's what I always do if I don't get an instant CC approval. Do a search here for a direct line to the GECRB underwriters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One last question:

 

I just got an offer for a Chase freedom CC. No AF, 0% intro APR for 15 months then 22.99%.

 

I already applied for the CapOne (approved) and Walmart (pending) credit cards. Should I apply for this one as well or leave it alone?

 

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One last question:

 

I just got an offer for a Chase freedom CC. No AF, 0% intro APR for 15 months then 22.99%.

 

I already applied for the CapOne (approved) and Walmart (pending) credit cards. Should I apply for this one as well or leave it alone?

 

Thanks!

Did you call GECRB about the Walmart card, as Occam suggested? Because I got the same message when I applied a few months ago. I called them right away, and they only needed to ask a couple of questions to verify my identity, and I was approved on the phone within minutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

One last question:

 

I just got an offer for a Chase freedom CC. No AF, 0% intro APR for 15 months then 22.99%.

 

I already applied for the CapOne (approved) and Walmart (pending) credit cards. Should I apply for this one as well or leave it alone?

 

Thanks!

Did you call GECRB about the Walmart card, as Occam suggested? Because I got the same message when I applied a few months ago. I called them right away, and they only needed to ask a couple of questions to verify my identity, and I was approved on the phone within minutes.

 

Yes, I did call them and they asked me a couple of questions, and then told me to expect either card or reason for refusal in the mail in 7-10 days.

 

So, what about that Chase card? i take it I should pass it up?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

One last question:

 

I just got an offer for a Chase freedom CC. No AF, 0% intro APR for 15 months then 22.99%.

 

I already applied for the CapOne (approved) and Walmart (pending) credit cards. Should I apply for this one as well or leave it alone?

 

Thanks!

Did you call GECRB about the Walmart card, as Occam suggested? Because I got the same message when I applied a few months ago. I called them right away, and they only needed to ask a couple of questions to verify my identity, and I was approved on the phone within minutes.

 

Yes, I did call them and they asked me a couple of questions, and then told me to expect either card or reason for refusal in the mail in 7-10 days.

 

So, what about that Chase card? i take it I should pass it up?

 

When you say you received an "offer"...was it a pre-approval? Or was it an "invitation" to apply? If it's a pre-selection or pre-approval, I'd definitely go for it. If it's just an invitation to apply, that's your call...it would be a good card to have, at this stage of the game.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

One last question:

 

I just got an offer for a Chase freedom CC. No AF, 0% intro APR for 15 months then 22.99%.

 

I already applied for the CapOne (approved) and Walmart (pending) credit cards. Should I apply for this one as well or leave it alone?

 

Thanks!

Did you call GECRB about the Walmart card, as Occam suggested? Because I got the same message when I applied a few months ago. I called them right away, and they only needed to ask a couple of questions to verify my identity, and I was approved on the phone within minutes.

 

Yes, I did call them and they asked me a couple of questions, and then told me to expect either card or reason for refusal in the mail in 7-10 days.

 

So, what about that Chase card? i take it I should pass it up?

 

When you say you received an "offer"...was it a pre-approval? Or was it an "invitation" to apply? If it's a pre-selection or pre-approval, I'd definitely go for it. If it's just an invitation to apply, that's your call...it would be a good card to have, at this stage of the game.

 

It's just an invitation to apply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was rejected for the Walmart GECRB card (likely within minutes of calling, but I didn't receive the email for another 6 days).

 

Likely rejected for the chase card as well since they use the same bureau.

 

Drat! :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It appears I was accepted for the chase card afterall! That's pretty cool. Thanks Occam!

Congrats! :clapping:

 

5% off at restaurants this quarter. I don't remember the other categories, but I will easily max it out on restaurants. Make sure you activate the 5% categories.

Edited by mendelssohn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It appears I was accepted for the chase card afterall! That's pretty cool. Thanks Occam!

:clapping: Sweet! :clapping:

 

You got the harder of the two out of the way. Wally's should be no problem at all next round.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last post in this topic was posted 3659 days ago. 

 

We strongly encourage you to start a new post instead of replying to this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      188225
    • Most Online
      2046

    Newest Member
    pennyProud
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Guidelines