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I'd like to thank the Russian Target hackers


syncracirca
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I'm always a proponent of elbow grease over product. :D

 

Elbow grease is an idiom for working hard at manual labour, as in "You need to use some elbow grease." It is a humorous reflection of the fact that some tasks can only be achieved by hard effort and human energy, contrasting with the idea that there should be some special oil, tool or chemical product to make the job easier.

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Wealthy People = Can I afford to pay for this in full? If Yes, Do I need it? If Yes, buy it. If No, skip.

 

Poor People = Can I afford the minimum payment?

 

 

This is the 2014 Pearl of Wisdom winner so far.

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Wealthy People = Can I afford to pay for this in full? If Yes, Do I need it? If Yes, buy it. If No, skip.

 

Poor People = Can I afford the minimum payment?

 

 

This is the 2014 Pearl of Wisdom winner so far.

 

Absolutely! :lol:

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I still don't understand what all this has to do with the russians...

I think because the Russian hackers forced him to use his credit cards and swear off devil (debit) cards for ever! Being forced lead him to look further into a tool that would help keep track of CC spending because he could never get it right before. Am I close, OP?

 

 

Yes, you nailed it.

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Some of you who are more financially savvy than I are amazed that I (or anybody) needs an application like this that costs $60 so that we live within our means. Most of you who are doing well without something like Mint or YNAB mentioned using a spreadsheet. A few years back I tried to do that. Maybe if you were sitting there with me helping me to figure out HOW to use the spreadsheet I would have succeeded. I was overcomplicating it and would introduce very simple math errors that threw the whole thing off. Simple things like how interest is calculated messed up my efforts....or coordinating purchases with my spouse. And tracking across multiple accounts.

 

You know how YNAB manages interest? It's so stupidly simple and could be applied in a spreadsheet just as easily. YNAB has you put in the interest charge (if you are a schmuck like me that was paying interest) as a transaction after the charge goes through. So simple, but it never occured to me to input it that way.

 

For me YNAB is like the smart parent that wants their kid to grow up and not be poor. And I didn't get this until I was....31 freaking years old. My parents have always failed at managing money, so how could they teach me?

 

If I for whatever reason suddenly didn't have YNAB anymore, I would be fine. YNAB taught me what I need to know to never have a problem with budgeting again.

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Some of you who are more financially savvy than I are amazed that I (or anybody) needs an application like this that costs $60 so that we live within our means. Most of you who are doing well without something like Mint or YNAB mentioned using a spreadsheet. A few years back I tried to do that. Maybe if you were sitting there with me helping me to figure out HOW to use the spreadsheet I would have succeeded. I was overcomplicating it and would introduce very simple math errors that threw the whole thing off. Simple things like how interest is calculated messed up my efforts....or coordinating purchases with my spouse. And tracking across multiple accounts.

 

You know how YNAB manages interest? It's so stupidly simple and could be applied in a spreadsheet just as easily. YNAB has you put in the interest charge (if you are a schmuck like me that was paying interest) as a transaction after the charge goes through. So simple, but it never occured to me to input it that way.

 

For me YNAB is like the smart parent that wants their kid to grow up and not be poor. And I didn't get this until I was....31 freaking years old. My parents have always failed at managing money, so how could they teach me?

 

If I for whatever reason suddenly didn't have YNAB anymore, I would be fine. YNAB taught me what I need to know to never have a problem with budgeting again.

 

I'm a huge fan of whatever works. This worked. Good for you for finding a solution!

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Some of you who are more financially savvy than I are amazed that I (or anybody) needs an application like this that costs $60 so that we live within our means. Most of you who are doing well without something like Mint or YNAB mentioned using a spreadsheet. A few years back I tried to do that. Maybe if you were sitting there with me helping me to figure out HOW to use the spreadsheet I would have succeeded. I was overcomplicating it and would introduce very simple math errors that threw the whole thing off. Simple things like how interest is calculated messed up my efforts....or coordinating purchases with my spouse. And tracking across multiple accounts.

 

You know how YNAB manages interest? It's so stupidly simple and could be applied in a spreadsheet just as easily. YNAB has you put in the interest charge (if you are a schmuck like me that was paying interest) as a transaction after the charge goes through. So simple, but it never occured to me to input it that way.

 

For me YNAB is like the smart parent that wants their kid to grow up and not be poor. And I didn't get this until I was....31 freaking years old. My parents have always failed at managing money, so how could they teach me?

 

If I for whatever reason suddenly didn't have YNAB anymore, I would be fine. YNAB taught me what I need to know to never have a problem with budgeting again.

 

Thanks for your post, before reading this thread I had never heard of YNAB! I have been using a spreadsheet for budgeting for years and while it did the trick I still wanted to take it to the next level. I downloaded the YNAB trial after reading your post and like you, I love it! Its much more intuitive than my spreadsheet and has features that I didn't know I was missing. The simplicity of the program makes me almost feel silly for not thinking of putting those things in my spreadsheet myself. At any rate, I think its well worth a one time fee for both me and hubby to have a synced view of the budget in our pockets at all time. That was the hardest part of using Excel is that my hubby would look at it once and forget it existed :dntknw: (not saying he can't do that with YNAB) but he can see the up to date version at any time without questioning where we are.

 

Happy budgeting!

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Some of you who are more financially savvy than I are amazed that I (or anybody) needs an application like this that costs $60 so that we live within our means. Most of you who are doing well without something like Mint or YNAB mentioned using a spreadsheet. A few years back I tried to do that. Maybe if you were sitting there with me helping me to figure out HOW to use the spreadsheet I would have succeeded. I was overcomplicating it and would introduce very simple math errors that threw the whole thing off. Simple things like how interest is calculated messed up my efforts....or coordinating purchases with my spouse. And tracking across multiple accounts.

 

You know how YNAB manages interest? It's so stupidly simple and could be applied in a spreadsheet just as easily. YNAB has you put in the interest charge (if you are a schmuck like me that was paying interest) as a transaction after the charge goes through. So simple, but it never occured to me to input it that way.

 

For me YNAB is like the smart parent that wants their kid to grow up and not be poor. And I didn't get this until I was....31 freaking years old. My parents have always failed at managing money, so how could they teach me?

 

If I for whatever reason suddenly didn't have YNAB anymore, I would be fine. YNAB taught me what I need to know to never have a problem with budgeting again.

Honestly, I paid intuit $40 some bucks and use QUICKEN Premier - I can automate it and customize it to pretty much whatever I need or want. Have no use for YNAB or MINT, I've tried both and they are useless.. even an Excel spreadsheet is useless for day to day budgeting and money management.

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Keep it simple and save the $60 for your bills!

 

Log in to each of your accounts DAILY and PIF weekly.

 

Simple, problems solved! :)

 

Exactly. I'm still not understanding the OPs problem (Not being difficult, I swear. I'm still having coffee and this often affects comprehension for me). You start every given day/week/month with cards with zero balances. You pick one that you havent' used in awhile, put gas on it this week so you have SOME utilization of SOME kind going on. Pay it off on payday. Use cash for everything else (cash has no interest so problem solved). Not sure what the problem is, unless OP is trying very hard to run every dollar thru cards to net as much rewards as possible, in which case put your recurring household bills on cards and then set up autopay thru your bank - you never have to think twice about when/how they get paid. Just don't carry balances whatever you do.

 

I know I'm missing something, and when ti's explained to me I'll be embarassed but posting along the way to say "hey I don't get this" is how people learn where society's sticking points are, and what the people as a community should be better educated on. Or something.

 

(ETA: I think "rich" and my husband thinks "poor" - which is why our scores have such a massive difference to them despite being married 20+ years. I think "can I pay this off the second I leave the cash register? No? Do not want." and my husband thinks "will I ever in my lifetime make as much money as this costs? Yes? Then I can afford it! BUY AND BUY NOWOMG HURRYHURRY NEWSTUFF RAWRRRRRRRRR". I do not like "broke at a higher income level", personally.)

Edited by GonnaGetEm
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Keep it simple and save the $60 for your bills!

 

Log in to each of your accounts DAILY and PIF weekly.

 

Simple, problems solved! :)

 

Exactly. I'm still not understanding the OPs problem (Not being difficult, I swear. I'm still having coffee and this often affects comprehension for me). You start every given day/week/month with cards with zero balances. You pick one that you havent' used in awhile, put gas on it this week so you have SOME utilization of SOME kind going on. Pay it off on payday. Use cash for everything else (cash has no interest so problem solved). Not sure what the problem is, unless OP is trying very hard to run every dollar thru cards to net as much rewards as possible, in which case put your recurring household bills on cards and then set up autopay thru your bank - you never have to think twice about when/how they get paid. Just don't carry balances whatever you do.

 

I know I'm missing something, and when ti's explained to me I'll be embarassed but posting along the way to say "hey I don't get this" is how people learn where society's sticking points are, and what the people as a community should be better educated on. Or something.

 

(ETA: I think "rich" and my husband thinks "poor" - which is why our scores have such a massive difference to them despite being married 20+ years. I think "can I pay this off the second I leave the cash register? No? Do not want." and my husband thinks "will I ever in my lifetime make as much money as this costs? Yes? Then I can afford it! BUY AND BUY NOWOMG HURRYHURRY NEWSTUFF RAWRRRRRRRRR". I do not like "broke at a higher income level", personally.)

 

 

If you don't understand this problem it means you are naturally better at handling credit cards than I am. Whatever you use, whether it be a spreadsheet, quicken, YNAB, Mint, or something else it doesn't matter as long as you know how are not overspending. You might be amazed at how many people this problem applies to.

 

I understand your need for a better explanation. It is an income/spending problem (for me). We have slightly more income than we do expenses, so there is not much room for error. We're working on fixing that, but when you're living on the edge like this and have holes in your shoes....you have to ask yourself the question: can I buy shoes right now? I feel like I'm being unreasonable here, but I promise you I'm posting this with the utmost of humility. It seems like I'm explaining away my 'overspending', but I'm really not. We haven't been to a restaurant in a long time and go to Salvation Army to buy clothes (there's actually alot of good stuff there).

 

The wife and I are working on making the gap between our income and our expenses larger, but in the mean time YNAB helps us paint a very clear picture of how much we have. If it's relevant we have about $300 left over every month after gas, groceries, all bills, prescriptions, and medical co-pays. What's killing us is a combination of student loans, orthodontist payment, and child support.

 

Honestly I'm a little embarassed for saying all of this.

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Keep it simple and save the $60 for your bills!

 

Log in to each of your accounts DAILY and PIF weekly.

 

Simple, problems solved! :)

 

Exactly. I'm still not understanding the OPs problem (Not being difficult, I swear. I'm still having coffee and this often affects comprehension for me). You start every given day/week/month with cards with zero balances. You pick one that you havent' used in awhile, put gas on it this week so you have SOME utilization of SOME kind going on. Pay it off on payday. Use cash for everything else (cash has no interest so problem solved). Not sure what the problem is, unless OP is trying very hard to run every dollar thru cards to net as much rewards as possible, in which case put your recurring household bills on cards and then set up autopay thru your bank - you never have to think twice about when/how they get paid. Just don't carry balances whatever you do.

 

I know I'm missing something, and when ti's explained to me I'll be embarassed but posting along the way to say "hey I don't get this" is how people learn where society's sticking points are, and what the people as a community should be better educated on. Or something.

 

(ETA: I think "rich" and my husband thinks "poor" - which is why our scores have such a massive difference to them despite being married 20+ years. I think "can I pay this off the second I leave the cash register? No? Do not want." and my husband thinks "will I ever in my lifetime make as much money as this costs? Yes? Then I can afford it! BUY AND BUY NOWOMG HURRYHURRY NEWSTUFF RAWRRRRRRRRR". I do not like "broke at a higher income level", personally.)

 

 

If you don't understand this problem it means you are naturally better at handling credit cards than I am. Whatever you use, whether it be a spreadsheet, quicken, YNAB, Mint, or something else it doesn't matter as long as you know how are not overspending. You might be amazed at how many people this problem applies to.

 

I understand your need for a better explanation. It is an income/spending problem (for me). We have slightly more income than we do expenses, so there is not much room for error. We're working on fixing that, but when you're living on the edge like this and have holes in your shoes....you have to ask yourself the question: can I buy shoes right now? I feel like I'm being unreasonable here, but I promise you I'm posting this with the utmost of humility. It seems like I'm explaining away my 'overspending', but I'm really not. We haven't been to a restaurant in a long time and go to Salvation Army to buy clothes (there's actually alot of good stuff there).

 

The wife and I are working on making the gap between our income and our expenses larger, but in the mean time YNAB helps us paint a very clear picture of how much we have. If it's relevant we have about $300 left over every month after gas, groceries, all bills, prescriptions, and medical co-pays. What's killing us is a combination of student loans, orthodontist payment, and child support.

 

Honestly I'm a little embarassed for saying all of this.

 

 

No need to be embarrassed as there are many on here who have been and are where you are. Most of us are on this board due to some type of financial issue or challenge that we have faced. Budgeting is a major concern for lots of people while there are people that are great at it and it seems to come natural to them there are others who really struggle to make it work. The tighter the budget is, the harder it gets!!! I think it is awesome that you found a system that works well for you, it certainly works for me.

 

Someone earlier may a note about elbow grease, YNAB does not absolve users of hard work and responsibility as a matter of fact that is one of the chief complaints of the naysayers of this software, is that it requires too much "manual labor".

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