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Oregon woman awarded $18.6 million after Equifax failed to fix errors on her credit report

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http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2013/07/equifax_must_pay_186_million_a.html

 

Back in 2009, Julie Miller of Marion County, Oregon (Salem), was denied credit by a bank due to an erroneous credit rating from Equifax. She
spent almost three years trying to get Equifax to fix the mistake, but Equifax refused. So naturally, Miller sued. Yesterday, a federal jury
in Portland ordered Equifax to pay Miller $18.6 million in damages--$18.4 million in punitive damages and $180,000 in actual damages. It is
believed to be one of the largest judgments ever imposed against a major credit bureau.


(Miller) contacted Equifax eight times between 2009 and 2011 in an effort to correct inaccuracies, including erroneous accounts and collection attempts, as well as a wrong Social Security number and birthday. Yet over and over, the lawsuit alleged, the Atlanta-based company failed to correct its mistakes.


"There was damage to her reputation, a breach of her privacy and the lost opportunity to seek credit," said Justin Baxter, the Portland
attorney who teamed on the case with his father and law partner, Michael Baxter. "She has a brother who is disabled and who can't get credit on
his own and she wasn't able to help him."





The Oregonian got its hands on Miller's original complaint. Read it here. It alleges that on at least three occasions, Equifax failed to even
investigate Miller's claims of errors on her report. On the times it did investigate, it failed to make changes despite the obvious errors.
Miller also charged that Equifax failed to send her a copy of her credit report at least twice, even though credit bureaus are required by law
to provide one free credit report per year to a customer upon request. Miller claimed she was denied credit at least one other time due to the
errors, and was also unable to help her disabled brother.


As it turned out, the errors came because someone at Equifax placed information from another Julie Miller into the plaintiff's record.
Apparently Equifax was so lazy that it sent the plaintiff's financial information to companies asking about the other Julie Miller. Although Equifax is appealing, now it's staring down the barrel of having to pay several times what it would have cost to simply fix the problem--though
more than likely it'll be less than the initial bill for $18.6 million.

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(((((YES...))))))

 

if you don't hit them in their pocket book, they won't make changes to their system.

 

Now Faced with these types of lawsuits, and the fact that other consumers will bring the same,

 

they have to change their ways.

 

 

this should be on the credit forum

 

please also post to the case law forum.

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I believe this was posted in the credit forum. I found it there and put it on FB.

 

 

I realized, I kinda owe CB for deciding what direction to take my career and all successes involved with it. CB is what made me decide what to do with my life. Weird.

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Doesn't matter that they'll appeal it down to next to nothing compared to the original judgement - it matters that she won and they will have to pay much more than it would have cost them to simply fix it. And it sets further precedence.

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Doesn't matter that they'll appeal it down to next to nothing compared to the original judgement - it matters that she won and they will have to pay much more than it would have cost them to simply fix it. And it sets further precedence.

I doubt it.. this is the credit agencies we're talking about here.. how many times have they been sued over and over for inaccuraces and have they changed at all? Nope..

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