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What do you do when store policy is they ask for ID?

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The only thing I can think of is shop somewhere else.

 

Recently happened to me at an IHOP. Long story short, to express my frustration, as I handed the card after she said "May i see your ID," I said "Oh, and look, there is a signature on the back."

 

Then, as I signed the receipt, I said: "Oh, and look: They MATCH!"

 

I was pissed. They had a big sign on the wall. They ask for one, happily almost.

 

I won't be eating there again.

 

But, in places like this.. what do you do?

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MasterCard

American Express

Visa

 

PjMax - I was the same way, but read my thread 1-2 posts below this one in the subforum. In addition to the potential for identity theft, there are instances where it gets annoying. I always comply (except that that Walmart), but then report them view the above websites. On the past month I've reported two places and both have changed their policy.

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What really get's me is when they ask AFTER they already ran the charge through

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MasterCard

American Express

Visa

 

PjMax - I was the same way, but read my thread 1-2 posts below this one in the subforum. In addition to the potential for identity theft, there are instances where it gets annoying. I always comply (except that that Walmart), but then report them view the above websites. On the past month I've reported two places and both have changed their policy.

 

This is most helpful.

 

I need to see if I can remember what card I used for IHOP. I may have to eat there one more time, show my ID, then happily report them. :)

 

I actually have pics of their signs...

 

Rt. 440 and COmunipaw Ave, IHOP, Jersey City NJ

 

CHECK OUT HOW FLAGRANTLY THEY VIOLATE! They are one of those that "happily" ask you for your ID. Made me MAD! :angry:

 

1000183_517971474936070_1946901450_n.jpg

 

1040785_517971394936078_1324474299_o.jpg

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^^ They even want it for DEBIT!

 

:angry: :angry: :angry:

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If you remember the date, just report all three (that you have cards for). They are violating the policies, so report them.

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What really get's me is when they ask AFTER they already ran the charge through

At that point I'd refuse. One they swiped the card and it was complete - the merchandise is yours.

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oh gee Joseph. I wish you could just relax and enjoy life. How does someone possibly get pissed and then give a worker attitude over a policy that is there for everyone to see? I really think you should call the employee and appologize for being obnoxious because they were doing their job.

 

You can and should report them to the CC and move on and not shop there. If you really had a problem with it at the time of service then you should calmly ask for the manager and discuss it with them. NOT the poor employee who is forced to work for the man.

Edited by futurehomeowner?

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oh gee Joseph. I wish you could just relax and enjoy life. How does someone possibly get pissed and then give a worker attitude over a policy that is there for everyone to see? I really think you should call the employee and appologize for being obnoxious because they were doing their job.

 

You can and should report them to the CC and move on and not shop there. If you really had a problem with it at the time of service then you should calmly ask for the manager and discuss it with them. NOT the poor employee who is forced to work for the man.

 

Correct. A minimum-wage or near minimum-wage isn't going to know or care about financial/ID laws (some states bar asking for ID with credit card), or what the agreement is between their store and a merchant service. All they are about is their next paycheck (I speak from personal experience) and how best to ensure they keep getting that paycheck. I rebutted a cashier once, and I felt like a complete child as the words escaped my lips. If a store posts that ID is required, I think twice before entering. I weight the necessity of my purchase there versus my options for getting the same purchase nearby. But if there is no posted policy, and they ask, I simply comply and report later.

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oh gee Joseph. I wish you could just relax and enjoy life. How does someone possibly get pissed and then give a worker attitude over a policy that is there for everyone to see? I really think you should call the employee and appologize for being obnoxious because they were doing their job.

 

You can and should report them to the CC and move on and not shop there. If you really had a problem with it at the time of service then you should calmly ask for the manager and discuss it with them. NOT the poor employee who is forced to work for the man.

 

 

 

oh gee Joseph. I wish you could just relax and enjoy life. How does someone possibly get pissed and then give a worker attitude over a policy that is there for everyone to see? I really think you should call the employee and appologize for being obnoxious because they were doing their job.

 

You can and should report them to the CC and move on and not shop there. If you really had a problem with it at the time of service then you should calmly ask for the manager and discuss it with them. NOT the poor employee who is forced to work for the man.

 

Correct. A minimum-wage or near minimum-wage isn't going to know or care about financial/ID laws (some states bar asking for ID with credit card), or what the agreement is between their store and a merchant service. All they are about is their next paycheck (I speak from personal experience) and how best to ensure they keep getting that paycheck. I rebutted a cashier once, and I felt like a complete child as the words escaped my lips. If a store posts that ID is required, I think twice before entering. I weight the necessity of my purchase there versus my options for getting the same purchase nearby. But if there is no posted policy, and they ask, I simply comply and report later.

Valid points, and I know the customer won't pay my paycheck (I worked at K-Mart, they were anal about it. Been there, Medion. Lost a sale or two that way; NOBODY likes to show ID, even a faked one. I just didn't ask, if nobody was looking.)

 

BUT, this one was the MANAGER with the sing-song. :angry:

 

Tempted to get stroked89 his pancakes, and report them. Because my angst has made me :beee:

Edited by rslifkin

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So, can you give me a quick explanation (or link) on what the issue is with showing ID?

 

I work in retail, and we seem to have three basic types of card users. Those who don't care about being asked, those who are offended by being asked, and those who want to be asked and write "see ID" on their card. No matter what we do, someone's not going to be happy. It's that way for a lot of things in the service industry, but if we can minimize the problems, it certainly does help.

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I was thinking about the See ID thing that a lot of people write on their cards. Is that giving you permission to circumvent the rules of mastercard? When I was in retail I got yelled at all of the time for not asking to see ID because the company I worked for had a policy to not ask for ID.

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So, can you give me a quick explanation (or link) on what the issue is with showing ID?

 

I work in retail, and we seem to have three basic types of card users. Those who don't care about being asked, those who are offended by being asked, and those who want to be asked and write "see ID" on their card. No matter what we do, someone's not going to be happy. It's that way for a lot of things in the service industry, but if we can minimize the problems, it certainly does help.

Ask hegemony. He is militant about it. (see his GEORGE-like sig)

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Also... UN-signed? Yes they have the right.

 

SIGNED??? It's my rights, harasser in uniform...

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So, can you give me a quick explanation (or link) on what the issue is with showing ID?

 

I work in retail, and we seem to have three basic types of card users. Those who don't care about being asked, those who are offended by being asked, and those who want to be asked and write "see ID" on their card. No matter what we do, someone's not going to be happy. It's that way for a lot of things in the service industry, but if we can minimize the problems, it certainly does help.

Basically, my ID is none of your damn business.

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And when you sign and it says "I agree to be bound by cardholder agreement" well T&C says signed card = No I.D.

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And when you sign and it says "I agree to be bound by cardholder agreement" well T&C says signed card = No I.D.

 

Well at least at my store, people who have signed their card have absolutely no problem.

 

But the 25% (totally made up that number, but it wouldn't suprise me if it's close) who don't sign their cards? Most cards that I have seen say something to the effect of 'not valid unless signed'. We basically have two options: ask for ID to visually verify, or refuse the customer's transaction.

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And when you sign and it says "I agree to be bound by cardholder agreement" well T&C says signed card = No I.D.

 

Well at least at my store, people who have signed their card have absolutely no problem.

 

But the 25% (totally made up that number, but it wouldn't suprise me if it's close) who don't sign their cards? Most cards that I have seen say something to the effect of 'not valid unless signed'. We basically have two options: ask for ID to visually verify, or refuse the customer's transaction.

 

I get that part. And, for a very long time, I did not sign my cards. In MOST of the circumstances in the past ~3-4 years or so, they would ask.. I would be aware I had an unsigned card, they matched up name, and I was good to go.

 

Now that I sign my cards and am getting more protective of what's mine, I tend to have more of a problem being asked ot show my I.D., it makes me feel like I am accused of a crime, like if I was pulled over for speeding. You may call this irrational, and that's fine.

 

And if I was an identity thief or fraudster, I could fake that I.D. these merchant agreements violate by asking for it. Why doesn't anybody ever talk about that?

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I also heard that writing "SEE I.D." is NOT a signature...

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So, can you give me a quick explanation (or link) on what the issue is with showing ID?

 

I work in retail, and we seem to have three basic types of card users. Those who don't care about being asked, those who are offended by being asked, and those who want to be asked and write "see ID" on their card. No matter what we do, someone's not going to be happy. It's that way for a lot of things in the service industry, but if we can minimize the problems, it certainly does help.

 

 

 

And when you sign and it says "I agree to be bound by cardholder agreement" well T&C says signed card = No I.D.

 

Well at least at my store, people who have signed their card have absolutely no problem.

 

But the 25% (totally made up that number, but it wouldn't suprise me if it's close) who don't sign their cards? Most cards that I have seen say something to the effect of 'not valid unless signed'. We basically have two options: ask for ID to visually verify, or refuse the customer's transaction.

 

I saw your first post earlier today and made a mental note to respond when I got home from work. Your question as I understand it is two-fold. Correct me if I am wrong, but your questions are;

  1. What are the downsides of showing ID?
  2. What are the credit card policies regarding showing ID?

The downsides to showing ID stem from identity theft. Some people are VERY good at quickly memorizing numbers (I can do this very easily and it drives people nuts). The combination of your credit card and your drivers license is an easy tool for stealing access to that card. The DL on its own can be used to steal identity (name, address, DL number, and some personal information depending on state).

 

And what are the credit card policies regarding showing ID? There are some states where it is ILLEGAL (as in, against state law) to require photo ID for a credit card transaction, unless the transaction would otherwise require ID even if performed via cash (such as alcohol or tobacco, or purchases on a military installation).

 

But aside from that, it's also against the merchant agreements. Visa and Mastercard prohibit it. By proxy, American Epxress prohibits it as no vendor can impose rules for their cardholders that are against what Visa/MC cardholders do. So, if a merchant takes Amex exclusively, they can require ID. If the merchant takes Visa and/or MC in addition to Amex, they cannot require ID. They can ask, but if declined, they cannot require it as a condition of sale.

 

Visa's Merchant agreement: http://usa.visa.com/download/merchants/card-acceptance-guidelines-for-visa-merchants.pdf

 

Cardholder Verification and Identification, beginning on pg.32:

 

 

The final step in the card acceptance process for transactions requiring a signature
is to ensure that the customer signs the sales receipt and to compare that signature
with the signature on the back of the card . Depending on the Visa card product and
point-of-sale terminal processing system, the customer should be in full view when
signing the receipt or point-of-sale terminal signature window display . If possible,
you should check the two signatures closely for any obvious inconsistencies in
spelling or handwriting.

 

 

When a magnetic-stripe or chip card transaction is PIN-based and the merchant
has an active PIN pad, Visa’s best practice is not to print a signature line on the
receipt . Merchants need to be aware that they should not request a signature
from the cardholder when a signature line is not present on the receipt .

 

Here's the one exception:

 

 

While checking card security features, you should also make sure that the card
is signed . An unsigned card is considered invalid and should not be accepted . If
a customer gives you an unsigned card, the following steps must be taken:
• Check the cardholder’s ID . Ask the cardholder for some form of official
government identification, such as a driver’s license or passport . Where
permissible by law, the ID serial number and expiration date should be
written on the sales receipt before you complete the transaction .
• Ask the customer to sign the card . The card should be signed within your full
view, and the signature checked against the customer’s signature on the ID .
A refusal to sign means the card is still invalid and cannot be accepted . Ask
the customer for another signed Visa card .
• Compare the signature on the card to the signature on the ID

 

And you mentioned the "See ID" question:

 

 

Some customers write “See ID” or “Ask for ID” in the signature panel, thinking
that this is a deterrent against fraud or forgery; that is, if their signature is not on
the card, a fraudster will not be able to forge it . In reality, criminals often don’t
take the time to practice signatures . They use cards as quickly as possible after a
theft and prior to the accounts being blocked . They are actually counting on you
not to look at the back of the card and compare signatures; they may even have
access to counterfeit identification with a signature in their own handwriting .
In this situation, follow recommended steps listed above under Unsigned Cards.

 

And here's the money shot:

 

 

When should you ask a cardholder for an official government ID? Although Visa
rules do not preclude merchants from asking for cardholder ID except in the
specific circumstances discussed in this guide, merchants cannot make an ID
a condition of acceptance . Therefore, merchants cannot as part of their regular
card acceptance procedures refuse to complete a purchase transaction because
a cardholder refuses to provide ID . It is important that merchants understand
that the requesting of a cardholder ID does not change the merchant’s liability
for chargebacks . However, it can slow down a sale and annoy the customer . In
some cases, it may even deter the use of the Visa card and result in the loss of
a potential sale . Visa believes merchants should not ask for ID as part of their
regular card acceptance procedures . Laws in several countries also make it
illegal for merchants to write a cardholder’s personal information, such as an
address or phone number, on a sales receipt .
If you are suspicious about the transaction or feel you need additional
information to ensure the identity of the cardholder, make a Code 10 call.

 

Bottom line is that by using your company's rule of requiring ID or refusing the sale, you are potentially violating state laws (unlikely, only 2-3 states have that law), and you are DEFINITELY violating the agreement your business signed with Visa and Mastercard (and possibly Amex) as a condition of accepting their forms of payment. You may think that you are right, but you are actually wrong.

 

You can put this to the test though. Post your company's name and business address here. Within 2-3 weeks, you will no longer be requiring ID for credit-card transactions.

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I honestly can't remember the last time I was asked for ID to make a credit or debit card purchase. Unfortunately, I also can't remember the last time I was asked for an ID to buy anything cash, either. :(

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Bottom line is that by using your company's rule of requiring ID or refusing the sale, you are potentially violating state laws (unlikely, only 2-3 states have that law), and you are DEFINITELY violating the agreement your business signed with Visa and Mastercard (and possibly Amex) as a condition of accepting their forms of payment. You may think that you are right, but you are actually wrong.

 

You can put this to the test though. Post your company's name and business address here. Within 2-3 weeks, you will no longer be requiring ID for credit-card transactions.

 

 

 

Thanks for the response! That makes total sense, and it seems like my company is doing well (as far as I know) because the only times we ask to see ID are when it's in the 'exception' of not having a signature on the back of the card.

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Thanks for the response! That makes total sense, and it seems like my company is doing well (as far as I know) because the only times we ask to see ID are when it's in the 'exception' of not having a signature on the back of the card.

 

 

So long as the only reason you're checking ID is to verify the signature on the ID compared to the signature on the transaction. Obviously, you're going to note things like name and face, and I can't fault you if you don't comply 100% when, in this example, the customer hasn't complied. I actually had a person request me ID a few years ago, and she stated that it was because I did not sign my card. She was very astute :)

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