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Tornado shelters for every school in Oklahoma petition

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Why just Oklahoma? What about Kansas, Texas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Alabama, (Remember the 2007 Enterprise tornado that slammed into a high school killing 9 students and injuring scores more when the section of the school collapsed on them), Georgia, et.al.

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Why just Oklahoma? What about Kansas, Texas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Alabama, (Remember the 2007 Enterprise tornado that slammed into a high school killing 9 students and injuring scores more when the section of the school collapsed on them), Georgia, et.al.

I don't know. I suppose the person who began the petition didn't think to make it a nationwide petition.

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It's being incorporated into the newer building codes. It was only in the last few years that they could forecast the path and arrival time of a tornado to where it made any difference. These were the 2 oldest schools in that town.

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It's being incorporated into the newer building codes. It was only in the last few years that they could forecast the path and arrival time of a tornado to where it made any difference. These were the 2 oldest schools in that town.

The last I'd read, the Moore mayor is going to make it a requirement for the new homes that will be built in Moore, not for existing homes or schools, or schools that will be built in the future. Not a peep about it for new homes or existing/new schools in other towns. The school administration seems to be waffling about adding safe rooms/basements into the schools.

 

If I remember reading right, the building contractors that had built new homes or rebuilt tornado destroyed homes in Moore after the past couple of tornadoes were supposed to attach the frames of the houses to the slabs using hurricane plates, which they did not do. Instead the builders cheaped out and just nailed them in like they normally do when building homes. If hurricane plates were required for the new homes, I sincerely hope they hold those builders (and the building inspectors) liable.

Edited by chi

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If they were in the direct line of a F5 tornado, hurricane plates would not have helped. Although they could possibly have helped for homes that were "close" but not in the direct path.

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Why just Oklahoma? What about Kansas, Texas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Alabama, (Remember the 2007 Enterprise tornado that slammed into a high school killing 9 students and injuring scores more when the section of the school collapsed on them), Georgia, et.al.

Or OH? Remember there was a tornado that slammed into a HS In Oh.

 

Or Wi?

 

Or any state in the south?

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Why just Oklahoma? What about Kansas, Texas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, Alabama, (Remember the 2007 Enterprise tornado that slammed into a high school killing 9 students and injuring scores more when the section of the school collapsed on them), Georgia, et.al.

Or OH? Remember there was a tornado that slammed into a HS In Oh.

 

Or Wi?

 

Or any state in the south?

The decision to build school shelters is made by the state, not by the federal government. If it were a nationwide petition then people would probably expect the government to make the decision for the states, and to pay the costs of building safe shelters or basements. I know FEMA does have matching funds for the costs of shelters but the rest, or possibly all, of the funds should come from state resident tax dollars. Since it's a state issue then I think that it would be up to the residents of each state to push for shelters in their own states.

Since a tornado in Alabama killed 8 children in a school in 2007, Alabama is now the only state that requires safe shelters to be built in new schools.

 

Instead of asking why this petition is just for Oklahoma, people should be asking themselves 'why don't I create a similar petition for my own state'.

If you don't want to sign the "just Okla." petition then don't, but I'll be more than happy to click on the link and sign the school safe room petition that you put up for the state you are in.

Edited by chi

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I think bringing attention to the issue will be a big help in motivating people to do something.

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With the amount of money spent on building new schools and making them look pretty there is no reason why a multi purpose shelter couldn't be installed in every new school or even retro fitted into every existing school.

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With the amount of money spent on building new schools and making them look pretty there is no reason why a multi purpose shelter couldn't be installed in every new school or even retro fitted into every existing school.

+1

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With the amount of money spent on building new schools and making them look pretty there is no reason why a multi purpose shelter couldn't be installed in every new school or even retro fitted into every existing school.

+1

+2

 

Quite truthfully, had you asked me last week (before this occurred) I would just have just presumed - knowing the violent weather that is prone to happen there - that all schools would have already had storm shelters. It is only logical.

Heck growing up, my Jr. High School even had a freaking Fall Out shelter. (granted, different type of danger...but I am sure the cost of to put them in wasn't cheap.)

 

That being said...I do somewhat see the "number-crunchers" point of view. The odds of of being hit by a tornado....even in OK, are very low....being hit by a F-4 or higher, is even lower. So low that they list it in thousands of years.......

 

Then again, every one knows that smoking can kill you. I don't think any one can argue that fact.......but yet, statically, the odds are still low until someone has achieved a considerable age, where the death rate is high anyway. But I don't see any intelligent person arguing that you shouldn't stop smoking because the odds are relatively low that you will die from it before age 65 (6% or 18% by 85).

 

Statistics are tools, not rules. When you base an action (or inaction) on statistics, you are gambling.

They gambled, the children paid for it.

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Why stop with schools? Tornadoes also strike shopping malls, churches, stadiums, fast food joints, and any other place where children may be present.

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With the amount of money spent on building new schools and making them look pretty there is no reason why a multi purpose shelter couldn't be installed in every new school or even retro fitted into every existing school.

+1

+2

 

Quite truthfully, had you asked me last week (before this occurred) I would just have just presumed - knowing the violent weather that is prone to happen there - that all schools would have already had storm shelters. It is only logical.

Heck growing up, my Jr. High School even had a freaking Fall Out shelter. (granted, different type of danger...but I am sure the cost of to put them in wasn't cheap.)

 

That being said...I do somewhat see the "number-crunchers" point of view. The odds of of being hit by a tornado....even in OK, are very low....being hit by a F-4 or higher, is even lower. So low that they list it in thousands of years.......

 

Then again, every one knows that smoking can kill you. I don't think any one can argue that fact.......but yet, statically, the odds are still low until someone has achieved a considerable age, where the death rate is high anyway. But I don't see any intelligent person arguing that you shouldn't stop smoking because the odds are relatively low that you will die from it before age 65 (6% or 18% by 85).

 

Statistics are tools, not rules. When you base an action (or inaction) on statistics, you are gambling.

They gambled, the children paid for it.

Wow...I remember the Fall Out shelters in my elementary school...haven't thought of that in years. In 2nd grade we had several drills with all of us getting to the shelter, and fitting in. It was pretty scary. That was during the Cuban missile crisis, so it was considered a very real threat at the time.

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Why stop with schools? Tornadoes also strike shopping malls, churches, stadiums, fast food joints, and any other place where children may be present.

You do have a valid point. However a community shelter (either in the school or within close proximity) would be "community" friendly. But you are talking a pretty penny to put them in enough areas to save a lot of lives.

 

A person's best hope is to have a shelter in their home. An employer's best hope is to have a shelter at work....and a school's best hope is to have one at the school. These are the 3 places a person spends most of their time. (8 hours at work and probably more than 8 hours at home, and 6+ hours at school during the school year) If those places have a safe place, you would be around 60 - 70% covered. The other times, well....keep abreast of your surroundings, know the weather forecast, and a goodly amount of prayer couldn't hurt.

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What percent of the area in population centers are hit by such strong tornadoes every 100 years? It's probably a tiny fraction of a percent. Then divide that by the percent of time students in school in a given week. How many schools have been destroyed by hurricanes when students are inside? I'm just looking at the statistics. It may be a good idea, but there are a lot of other dangers out there.

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Um, if a hurricane is coming, they won't be having school.

 

As for tornadoes, 2 within the last 5-6 years (that included fatalities). there were 2 others ones I believe as well, but with no one dying.

 

However, to answer your question. 45. Or rather, 45 where there were fatalities. I do know of other schools that have been hit where there were no fatalities at the school.

Remember, (and you can repeat after me if you like) Statistics are tools, not rules.

 

The odds of your house burning down is extremely small....somewhere between .008 and .00016. I mean...that is pretty small, right? Does that mean we should not have fire detectors? Your odds of being struck by lightning is .001, does this mean it is ok to go out and play in a storm?

The odds of winning Powerball is something like 1 in 175,000,000....yet people still play.

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There's probably more risk of death from traffic, falling safes and pianos, etc. when taking a walk to the store to buy a Powerball ticket than there is chance of winning. Then bring lightning into the equation...

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There's probably more risk of death from traffic, falling safes and pianos, etc. when taking a walk to the store to buy a Powerball ticket than there is chance of winning. Then bring lightning into the equation...

Of course there is more risk. That doesn't mean that we shouldn't try to minimize this risk.

 

I can't say about other states, but I know in Florida, many schools are used as hurricane shelters. (not all, but many). Now living in Jacksonville, the odds are against a direct hit due to the way it is notched in at the coast. But yet we did have a tropical storm hit us a few years back. We were lucky that when our "odds" came up, it was light (although don't tell my best friend that....a live oak came down on her house) But still they build schools to where they are capable of being used as a shelter. (again, not all, but many).

 

It would seem prudent for people who live in areas that are prone to devastating tornadoes to do the same.

 

Also

 

Totally unrelated to the discussion at hand....

 

I have seen people comment that the storms took down "brick houses". What a lot of people don't understand is that most "brick houses" today are only facades. Most contemporary brick houses are stick built with bricks on the exterior (as opposed to a true masonry home where the bricks are the supports) That is why they don't hold up to tornadoes or hurricanes much better than a house built of wood. (just to note, though, many "brick homes" in Florida - or at least used to be - were still masonry because the actual house was cinder block with a brick facade)

 

Like I said, that really isn't pertinent to the discussion....just wanted to throw it in there.

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