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Felonies

The last post in this topic was posted 3749 days ago. 

 

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

That is pretty rough. It also doesn't address your SIL's problem. It would have been better to place her into a program or rehab facility.

I agree, she will probably lose her license. But maybe, just maybe, they might have their own rehab program for nurses that become addicted to meds. She should really try to check into it. And perhaps (again, just perhaps) if they do, when she appeals the judge might be a little more lenient on her.

 

I don't know how these programs work. I have just "heard" that they are out there. The problem of medical professionals becoming addicted to medications has been around for a while. I really think the AMA, ANA, and other associations need to take on the problem head on (that and psychiatric services). Doctors, Nurses, and Pharmacists will not seek help because they fear losing their licenses.

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

 

They will be monitoring her drug taking/seeking behavior while on felony probation. They may also require classes and/or treatment as a requirement of probation. Messes up again=probation violation and she may be spending that 5 years down here around Boise (Kuna).

 

public defender = you get what you pay for.

 

May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

That is pretty rough. It also doesn't address your SIL's problem. It would have been better to place her into a program or rehab facility.

I agree, she will probably lose her license. But maybe, just maybe, they might have their own rehab program for nurses that become addicted to meds. She should really try to check into it. And perhaps (again, just perhaps) if they do, when she appeals the judge might be a little more lenient on her.

 

I don't know how these programs work. I have just "heard" that they are out there. The problem of medical professionals becoming addicted to medications has been around for a while. I really think the AMA, ANA, and other associations need to take on the problem head on (that and psychiatric services). Doctors, Nurses, and Pharmacists will not seek help because they fear losing their licenses.

 

They have the legal authority to access meds as they wish. We all need to get a prescription. They are the LAST people that should be given a break (legally, ethically, morally). Sometimes you need to take away the cookie jar (licensure).

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

 

Not really sure from what I have seen in this thread what she bases a claim upon that the PD was "terrible."

 

The range on county jail time is interesting, unless it is 90 days, usually reduced to 30 with good time (a standard 3:1 practice).

 

And with this being subsequent conduct, I don't see any way around the licensing entity yanking the license...C&F provisions may allow for her to appeal for a reinstatement upon completion of the term of supervision and a demonstration that she is clean and sober.

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Sorry about our sister, mdw. :lol:

 

On the bright side, jail is awesome. There are eyeshadows to be made and Dorito tamales, and they teach you how to thread your armpits. :(

 

Hope she gets the pain thing worked out :rofl:

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

 

They will be monitoring her drug taking/seeking behavior while on felony probation. They may also require classes and/or treatment as a requirement of probation. Messes up again=probation violation and she may be spending that 5 years down here around Boise (Kuna).

 

public defender = you get what you pay for.

 

May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

 

She works at the Boise State Penn :)

 

Oh she will appeal she can do no wrong.

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Sorry about our sister, mdw. :ph34r:

 

Don't be (ex sil not my sister) I mean I don't hate her or anything but she has some major problems.

 

On the bright side, jail is awesome. There are eyeshadows to be made and Dorito tamales, and they teach you how to thread your armpits. :)

 

:ph34r:

Hope she gets the pain thing worked out :lol:

 

That is one thing I do hope she can get solved, I KNOW she is in pain, that she is not faking, I wish she would have the surgery to help her.

Edited by mdw2006

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First, I don't know that I buy that it's a genetics thing, but for no real reason. I haven't actually done any research really. But, I have a boatload of alkies and addicts in my family, and yet... I'm not. I could see it happening, so I just watch myself. If I think I've been drinking too often, then... I stop. It's that simple. I do not understand people that say they can't stop. I just don't. It's very, very easy to just NOT pick something up. :huh:

Yes, it's easy to not start drinking or smoking, but is a whole different ball game with painkillers. Usually, you start on them for a reason, with a script, you know? It's not like you HAVE to have a cigarette or a drink, but with painkillers, sometimes you HAVE to have them. And if you have no reason to suspect you have a predisposition to addiction, then why hesitate to take them?

 

Chronic pain sucks flowers. That much I know.

 

Painkillers are a bit different than alcohol, meth, etc. But, given that I know the dangers of addiction to painkillers, I take reasonable precautions when I absolutely must take them. First, I almost never fill the script. Then, on the rare occasion I have, I get the bare min. number with no refills so that I have to seek out a Dr. to get more (never done it).

 

 

 

 

It would be nice if we were all perfect and in control of every aspect of our lives, wouldn't it?

 

I get that addiction is addiction and its something tough, I really do...but, I don't think it takes perfection to be a person that wants to try hard to make tough decisions about his/her life. In fact, I'd say being smart enough to ask for help where it is needed is making the decision to control a situation.

 

I just wanted to say that because I think a lot of times we let the words or impressions of perffection get in the way of understanding that its okay to slip and fall...but you have to get up...and getting up, even with the risk of another fall, is what makes all the difference in the world, IMO.

 

Now whether some have the propensity to just stay down after a fall more than others...I suppose that's another discussion...

 

ETA- 20yrs is some cool stuff!

 

An addict does not think like a nonaddict does. However, before an addict is addicted, they are not an addict. They still made the same decisions when they started taking the meds, the drugs, drinking etc. Therefore they are still responsible for their own addiction.

 

Let me help you out with this thought process. It has nothing to do with drugs at all really. It has to do with the way the individual thinks. Drugs are a symptom of the disease. Those who are afllicted with this distorted thought process may never use drugs, but I would venture to say they probably work too much, eat too much, spend too much, you get the idea. I bet many here have made poor financial choices that have been motivated by the very same distroted thought process. The differemce is there is not a debtors prison to send us too.

 

Jim

 

 

Spot on. An addictive personality is and addictive personality. It may not be drugs or booze, but it'll be something. Food (or exercise) or what have you.

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Spot on. An addictive personality is and addictive personality. It may not be drugs or booze, but it'll be something. Food (or exercise) or what have you.

 

 

If that's the case, everyone is addicted to something. Following that logic, who gets to say whats good or bad to be addicted to?

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who gets to say whats good or bad to be addicted to?

 

 

The general rule of thumb is that your addictions are OK, other peoples show lack of willpower. ;)

 

Amazes me how many people eat themselves into obesity, gamble themselves into bankruptcy, smoke themselves into lung cancer and still point the finger at others.

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who gets to say whats good or bad to be addicted to?

 

 

The general rule of thumb is that your addictions are OK, other peoples show lack of willpower. ;)

 

Amazes me how many people eat themselves into obesity, gamble themselves into bankruptcy, smoke themselves into lung cancer and still point the finger at others.

 

Any extremist is on the nutty side, imo. I also think we are all nutty. Do the math. :huh:

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

 

They will be monitoring her drug taking/seeking behavior while on felony probation. They may also require classes and/or treatment as a requirement of probation. Messes up again=probation violation and she may be spending that 5 years down here around Boise (Kuna).

 

public defender = you get what you pay for.

 

May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

 

She works at the Boise State Penn <_<

 

Oh she will appeal she can do no wrong.

 

Oh that would be bad. Just switch into an IDOC jumpsuit.

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Spot on. An addictive personality is and addictive personality. It may not be drugs or booze, but it'll be something. Food (or exercise) or what have you.

 

 

If that's the case, everyone is addicted to something. Following that logic, who gets to say whats good or bad to be addicted to?

 

Not really. There are lots of people who live ordinary lives with a balanced lifestyle. Of course the people who get all the press are those afflicted with addictive choices because they are more extreme than most.

 

Jim

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In a related story, Heidi Klum has issued a statement re: fat people. She doesn't understand why they exist. How hard is it to just eat less? :yahoo:

 

 

How hard would it be for me not to slap her in the face.

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Update:

 

She called my db and said my neice won't be coming to stay with her and go to school (mind you she hasn't told her daughter that yet or why she can't come down, db says she needs to come talk to her in person, we know that won't happen)

 

Anyway:

 

30 to 90 days in jail

probation for 5 years

and she will more then likely lose her nursing license.

 

of course her public defender was terrible and she is appealing.

That is pretty rough. It also doesn't address your SIL's problem. It would have been better to place her into a program or rehab facility.

I agree, she will probably lose her license. But maybe, just maybe, they might have their own rehab program for nurses that become addicted to meds. She should really try to check into it. And perhaps (again, just perhaps) if they do, when she appeals the judge might be a little more lenient on her.

 

I don't know how these programs work. I have just "heard" that they are out there. The problem of medical professionals becoming addicted to medications has been around for a while. I really think the AMA, ANA, and other associations need to take on the problem head on (that and psychiatric services). Doctors, Nurses, and Pharmacists will not seek help because they fear losing their licenses.

 

 

They may still be ordering her into a program as a condition of probation. Don't give up yet. Lol. And from what ive seen, it can be easier to get them in via probation conditions.

 

As for the public defender that sucks. Here we don't have a public defenders office. We have private attorneys who request to be added to the courtnappointed list. And they are DARN good attorneys. Usually their fees are added as court costs, but the costs are a FRACTION what they otherwise would be.

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May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

Hehe. I wish my job was as easy as being a babysitter. :)

 

There is much more yo it than "admit responsibility, take your licks and move on" especially for longer term supervisions (like this 5 year term.

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May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

Hehe. I wish my job was as easy as being a babysitter. :rolleyes:

 

There is much more yo it than "admit responsibility, take your licks and move on" especially for longer term supervisions (like this 5 year term.

 

I am not saying the life of a parole/probation officer is easy, but basically babysitting and coddling adults (literally).

 

Being a parolee is easy, just behave like the rest of us.

 

Hard part of being parole/probation officer is that you have like 500 on your caseload!

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May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

Hehe. I wish my job was as easy as being a babysitter. :lol:

 

There is much more yo it than "admit responsibility, take your licks and move on" especially for longer term supervisions (like this 5 year term.

 

I am not saying the life of a parole/probation officer is easy, but basically babysitting and coddling adults (literally).

 

Being a parolee is easy, just behave like the rest of us.

 

Hard part of being parole/probation officer is that you have like 500 on your caseload!

 

Uh I don't coddle jack. And really, neither do any of my coworkers. LOL my supervisor came into my office once cuz a person didn't like their conditions, and for real he said "I didn't ask you to come here. YOU asked for probation.

 

I'm there for three reasons: 1.) monitor compliance with Court orders. 2.) Protect society/help ensure public safety and 3.)HELp FOSTER rehabilitation/change to being a productive member of society. BUT if 1 and 2 aren't there I don't care about your willingness to change it's at the bottom of the lists. And if 3 ain't there and it is CAUSING violations, I'm gonna be less concerned about helping and more concerned with addressing the violations. As they say you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. And I can't MAKE a person follow their conditions. But if all I had to worry about was that monthly visit (or however often it is), then I wouldn't be doin my job. You're right. It is difficult and there are large caseloads. But even if my caseload was only 20 people it would STILL not be a cakewalk.

 

ETA: to sa a probation/parole officer is "just a babysitter" is like saying a receptionist/secretary ONLY answers the phone. Or a shrink is just pill pusher.

Edited by angeleyeskkhr

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May want to think twice about appealing, may get a tougher sentence. This sentence does not seem that terribly tough (30-90 days jail) for multiple felonies. Probation is just getting babysat. Admit responsibility, take your licks, and move on.

 

Hehe. I wish my job was as easy as being a babysitter. :)

 

There is much more yo it than "admit responsibility, take your licks and move on" especially for longer term supervisions (like this 5 year term.

 

I am not saying the life of a parole/probation officer is easy, but basically babysitting and coddling adults (literally).

 

Being a parolee is easy, just behave like the rest of us.

 

Hard part of being parole/probation officer is that you have like 500 on your caseload!

 

Uh I don't coddle jack. And really, neither do any of my coworkers. LOL my supervisor came into my office once cuz a person didn't like their conditions, and for real he said "I didn't ask you to come here. YOU asked for probation.

 

I'm there for three reasons: 1.) monitor compliance with Court orders. 2.) Protect society/help ensure public safety and 3.)HELp FOSTER rehabilitation/change to being a productive member of society. BUT if 1 and 2 aren't there I don't care about your willingness to change it's at the bottom of the lists. And if 3 ain't there and it is CAUSING violations, I'm gonna be less concerned about helping and more concerned with addressing the violations. As they say you can lead a horse to water but you can't make them drink. And I can't MAKE a person follow their conditions. But if all I had to worry about was that monthly visit (or however often it is), then I wouldn't be doin my job. You're right. It is difficult and there are large caseloads. But even if my caseload was only 20 people it would STILL not be a cakewalk.

 

ETA: to sa a probation/parole officer is "just a babysitter" is like saying a receptionist/secretary ONLY answers the phone. Or a shrink is just pill pusher.

 

I have a good friend that works for the state, she is a senior felony parole/probation officer. She even gets to "strap up" and visit houses/work of the offenders.

 

We share many of the same clients, and work a "team approach". They are more lenient on those suffering from mental illness though. Often I recommend to her (or other PO's) what should be done to assist the client with their parole/probation and meeting the requirements.

 

I know there is much more done than babysitting. I know the caseloads are extremely bad, and I'm sure you feel overextended. You can quote 1 and 2, but essentially you have the same goal as I do and that is modifying, or more specifically shaping behavior. In addition, you get the added bonus of applying punishment, which I do not.

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I know there is much more done than babysitting. I know the caseloads are extremely bad, and I'm sure you feel overextended. You can quote 1 and 2, but essentially you have the same goal as I do and that is modifying, or more specifically shaping behavior. In addition, you get the added bonus of applying punishment, which I do not.

 

Neither a probation officer nor a parole officer (at least in MOST jurisdictions) applies ANY manner of punishment under the color of law. In teh case of probation, the officer can submit a report of violation, after which the State will file its Motion to Revoke or Motion to Adjudicate to the Court. Only the Court can actually modify or revoke the specific terms of supervision.

 

In the case of parole, the officer reports the violation and a decision is made outside of their office (in Texas, it is an Austin decision on ALL warrants) whether to seek a violator's warrant or not. Only the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles retains the authority to revoke supervision or add conditions of supervision to a person who is on active supervision.

 

And with the recent decisions out of the 5th Circuit, I would *LOVE* to see an officer actually attempting to sanction via punishment as the officer could then be held personally liable...

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I know there is much more done than babysitting. I know the caseloads are extremely bad, and I'm sure you feel overextended. You can quote 1 and 2, but essentially you have the same goal as I do and that is modifying, or more specifically shaping behavior. In addition, you get the added bonus of applying punishment, which I do not.

 

Neither a probation officer nor a parole officer (at least in MOST jurisdictions) applies ANY manner of punishment under the color of law. In teh case of probation, the officer can submit a report of violation, after which the State will file its Motion to Revoke or Motion to Adjudicate to the Court. Only the Court can actually modify or revoke the specific terms of supervision.

 

In the case of parole, the officer reports the violation and a decision is made outside of their office (in Texas, it is an Austin decision on ALL warrants) whether to seek a violator's warrant or not. Only the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles retains the authority to revoke supervision or add conditions of supervision to a person who is on active supervision.

 

And with the recent decisions out of the 5th Circuit, I would *LOVE* to see an officer actually attempting to sanction via punishment as the officer could then be held personally liable...

 

I figured that distinction would be lost on him.

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I know there is much more done than babysitting. I know the caseloads are extremely bad, and I'm sure you feel overextended. You can quote 1 and 2, but essentially you have the same goal as I do and that is modifying, or more specifically shaping behavior. In addition, you get the added bonus of applying punishment, which I do not.

 

Neither a probation officer nor a parole officer (at least in MOST jurisdictions) applies ANY manner of punishment under the color of law. In teh case of probation, the officer can submit a report of violation, after which the State will file its Motion to Revoke or Motion to Adjudicate to the Court. Only the Court can actually modify or revoke the specific terms of supervision.

 

In the case of parole, the officer reports the violation and a decision is made outside of their office (in Texas, it is an Austin decision on ALL warrants) whether to seek a violator's warrant or not. Only the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles retains the authority to revoke supervision or add conditions of supervision to a person who is on active supervision.

 

And with the recent decisions out of the 5th Circuit, I would *LOVE* to see an officer actually attempting to sanction via punishment as the officer could then be held personally liable...

 

Not true in WA state. Officers do have the power to place conditions and modify.

 

Step

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