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BrownEyes

Writing DL number ON the receipt?

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We were at a local video store today buying a movie. We're regular customers and have an account with them to rent movies. So when they asked for ID I didn't think much of it because they always do when you rent movies from them. It wasn't until I noticed the sales girl, with her back mostly to me, writing something down as she was looking at my husband's driver's license. I asked her what she was writing down.

 

She told me she was writing my husband's driver's license number on their copy of the credit card receipt. That's when it also dawned on me that we were BUYING this time, not renting so she asked for ID because we used our American Express to pay for the movie. I told her she could NOT write the DL number on the receipt. She got really snippy and said that was their policy. I told her that's never been their policy before, at least not with rentals and regardless, I'd cancel the sale before I'd allow her to write down any sort of identifiable information ON the credit card receipt. She went and got the manager who went through the same spiel about it being policy.

 

I then asked for the receipt they just wrote the number down on so I could cross it out. The manager instead shredded it in front of me and allowed us to buy the movie "just this once" without using our driver's license number.

 

Anyone know if that's allowed with American Express? They would have refused the sale. Except when she tried to tell me it was that or nothing, I simply said "nothing".

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Some states that is actually illegal. I don't have a comprehensive list of states, though somebody else might.

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We were at a local video store today buying a movie. We're regular customers and have an account with them to rent movies. So when they asked for ID I didn't think much of it because they always do when you rent movies from them. It wasn't until I noticed the sales girl, with her back mostly to me, writing something down as she was looking at my husband's driver's license. I asked her what she was writing down.

 

She told me she was writing my husband's driver's license number on their copy of the credit card receipt. That's when it also dawned on me that we were BUYING this time, not renting so she asked for ID because we used our American Express to pay for the movie. I told her she could NOT write the DL number on the receipt. She got really snippy and said that was their policy. I told her that's never been their policy before, at least not with rentals and regardless, I'd cancel the sale before I'd allow her to write down any sort of identifiable information ON the credit card receipt. She went and got the manager who went through the same spiel about it being policy.

 

I then asked for the receipt they just wrote the number down on so I could cross it out. The manager instead shredded it in front of me and allowed us to buy the movie "just this once" without using our driver's license number.

 

Anyone know if that's allowed with American Express? They would have refused the sale. Except when she tried to tell me it was that or nothing, I simply said "nothing".

ILLEGAL IN SOME STATES

 

Bad enough you LET THEM see the ID

 

But to let them write the number down :blink:

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We were at a local video store today buying a movie. We're regular customers and have an account with them to rent movies. So when they asked for ID I didn't think much of it because they always do when you rent movies from them. It wasn't until I noticed the sales girl, with her back mostly to me, writing something down as she was looking at my husband's driver's license. I asked her what she was writing down.

 

She told me she was writing my husband's driver's license number on their copy of the credit card receipt. That's when it also dawned on me that we were BUYING this time, not renting so she asked for ID because we used our American Express to pay for the movie. I told her she could NOT write the DL number on the receipt. She got really snippy and said that was their policy. I told her that's never been their policy before, at least not with rentals and regardless, I'd cancel the sale before I'd allow her to write down any sort of identifiable information ON the credit card receipt. She went and got the manager who went through the same spiel about it being policy.

 

I then asked for the receipt they just wrote the number down on so I could cross it out. The manager instead shredded it in front of me and allowed us to buy the movie "just this once" without using our driver's license number.

 

Anyone know if that's allowed with American Express? They would have refused the sale. Except when she tried to tell me it was that or nothing, I simply said "nothing".

 

I think it's illegal in most states to write down any identifying information. In addition you should not even be showing your ID for a credit card purchase, it's not safe practice, nor for renting a video - there are video cards for that or they can look you up in the computer.

 

 

http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs15-mt.htm

There my be something about it here:

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Bad enough you LET THEM see the ID

 

But to let them write the number down :wave:

 

Yes, yes, I know, George. :wave:

 

But, I didn't *let them* write the number down. I asked for the receipt as soon as I realized that's what she was doing, but she had a shredder right behind the counter and shredded it for me while I watched.

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Completely illegal. In addition to the Visa/MC rules, state laws prohibit merchants from requiring additional information when accepting credit cards. Merchants cannot make note of your phone number, address, driver's license or other personal information. They can't even hint to consumers that such information is required. Consumers can sue merchants that require additional information with credit card transactions and win big money. Civil penalties of $250 for the first violation and $1,000 for subsequent violations are awarded to consumers when merchants break this law.

 

CREDIT CARD SIGNATURE IS ALL THE ID NEEDED

 

When you pay for merchandise with a Visa card, MasterCard, or American Express any store that accepts these cards should accept yours too, no questions asked. It's part of the deal that merchants agree to when they become participating members.

 

They must check your signature and the card - electronically or by telephone - to be sure it's valid. Once the answer comes up yes, they can go ahead and charge. They can't ask you for any further identification - not a license plate number, Social Security number, proof of address, phone number or photo ID.

 

Your personal ID isn't needed because Visa, MasterCard, and American Express all guarantee payment on cards that have been properly checked. If the issuer mistakenly authorizes a sale on a bad card, it should make good. MasterCard says that merchants receive instant settlement. The contract MasterCard merchants sign specifically prevents them from asking for personal ID.

 

Unfortunately, not all merchants play by the rules. Some, apparently, haven't read them.

 

WHAT YOU CAN DO

 

MasterCard wants to hear about merchants who break their rules. Send the name and address and an account of what happened to MasterCard WorldWide 2000 Purchase St. Purchase, NY 10577 or call 1-800-300-3069. The merchant's bank will get a stiff letter, ordering it to investigate and bring the offending store into line - or pay a $2,000 fine. You may also report violations online:

 

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/c...violations.html

 

Visa enforces the same rules as MasterCard. "When we hear about a violation, we ask the bank that signed the merchant to get together with the merchant and see that the practice is stopped," Visa representative states. Violations of Visa’s Operating Regulations result in fines of no less than $5,000. To report a merchant, write to Visa Inc. P.O. Box 8999 San Francisco, CA 94128-8999 or call 1-800-VISA-911.

 

American Express also prohibits merchants from asking for IDs. "All a merchant is supposed to do is take an imprint, make sure the signature matches and swipe the card through the terminal, to get authorization." Report violations to: American Express P.O. Box 297812 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-7812 or call 1-800-528-4800 (International: 1-336-393-1111) or report online: http://americanexpress.com/yourchoice

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But, I didn't *let them* write the number down.

You would not have been a victim of this crime had you kept your ID to yourself in the first place.

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But, I didn't *let them* write the number down.

You would not have been a victim of this crime had you kept your ID to yourself in the first place.

My ID only comes out of my wallet when it is REQUIRED BY LAW

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It would be helpful, if we knew what states dont allow information to be written down on a credit/debit card receipt.

 

I dont think that would prevent them from putting your id number in the membership record though but cant be on the credit receipt and that includes your license plate number as well.

Edited by webworm98

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It would be helpful, if we knew what states dont allow information to be written down on a credit/debit card receipt.

 

I dont think that would prevent them from putting your id number in the membership record though but cant be on the credit receipt and that includes your license plate number as well.

MEMBERSHIP ask for driver's license ("IF" they think it will do anything)

 

NOT LICENSE PLATE

 

I walked to the video store

 

I rode my bike

 

I take the bus

 

I don't own a car

 

:lol:

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Completely illegal. In addition to the Visa/MC rules, state laws prohibit merchants from requiring additional information when accepting credit cards. Merchants cannot make note of your phone number, address, driver's license or other personal information. They can't even hint to consumers that such information is required. Consumers can sue merchants that require additional information with credit card transactions and win big money. Civil penalties of $250 for the first violation and $1,000 for subsequent violations are awarded to consumers when merchants break this law.

 

CREDIT CARD SIGNATURE IS ALL THE ID NEEDED

 

When you pay for merchandise with a Visa card, MasterCard, or American Express any store that accepts these cards should accept yours too, no questions asked. It's part of the deal that merchants agree to when they become participating members.

 

They must check your signature and the card - electronically or by telephone - to be sure it's valid. Once the answer comes up yes, they can go ahead and charge. They can't ask you for any further identification - not a license plate number, Social Security number, proof of address, phone number or photo ID.

 

Your personal ID isn't needed because Visa, MasterCard, and American Express all guarantee payment on cards that have been properly checked. If the issuer mistakenly authorizes a sale on a bad card, it should make good. MasterCard says that merchants receive instant settlement. The contract MasterCard merchants sign specifically prevents them from asking for personal ID.

 

Unfortunately, not all merchants play by the rules. Some, apparently, haven't read them.

 

WHAT YOU CAN DO

 

MasterCard wants to hear about merchants who break their rules. Send the name and address and an account of what happened to MasterCard WorldWide 2000 Purchase St. Purchase, NY 10577 or call 1-800-300-3069. The merchant's bank will get a stiff letter, ordering it to investigate and bring the offending store into line - or pay a $2,000 fine. You may also report violations online:

 

http://www.mastercard.com/us/personal/en/c...violations.html

 

Visa enforces the same rules as MasterCard. "When we hear about a violation, we ask the bank that signed the merchant to get together with the merchant and see that the practice is stopped," Visa representative states. Violations of Visa’s Operating Regulations result in fines of no less than $5,000. To report a merchant, write to Visa Inc. P.O. Box 8999 San Francisco, CA 94128-8999 or call 1-800-VISA-911.

 

American Express also prohibits merchants from asking for IDs. "All a merchant is supposed to do is take an imprint, make sure the signature matches and swipe the card through the terminal, to get authorization." Report violations to: American Express P.O. Box 297812 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33329-7812 or call 1-800-528-4800 (International: 1-336-393-1111) or report online: http://americanexpress.com/yourchoice

Is this confirmation that you are also "Continental"? I've suspected as much for awhile now.

 

But, let's get down to business. How do you know it's "completely illegal"? Is it illegal in all states? Do you know in which state the OP lives? If the OP lives in a state where it may not be illegal, does this mean you you have just given erroneous advice?

Edited by Uncle Leo

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It would be helpful, if we knew what states dont allow information to be written down on a credit/debit card receipt.

 

I dont think that would prevent them from putting your id number in the membership record though but cant be on the credit receipt and that includes your license plate number as well.

DOESN'T MATTER WHAT THE LIST IS...it violates credit card policy

 

I have seen a list though...

Edited by GEORGE

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