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breeze

Military deployment and credit

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Id like to say that I agree with shane and call BS.

 

When you are on a ship, internet is a shaky thing at best. Plus others can ruin your internet privlages as what happend to DH and me this last deployment. Some dudes beat up another dude in a diff country so the whole ship was on lock down, no liberty, no phone no internet no nothing. For THREE MONTHS, I did not know if my DH was ok or not and had no friggen contact from the command because or oms chick was an salamander. SO how do you expect people to do credit work when crud like that happens???

 

Luckily for us I have control over the finances and everything with that was ok. but the military is not an easy avenue to deal with finances.

 

Oh, and they lie, a lot, about nearly everything. Ask me how i know.

 

A-frickin-men.

 

And yeah, I'm nodding in agreement that many deployed troops have little to no access or time to deal with issues.

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I can't believe that I forgot to add to my previous post that CB is not VIEWABLE here on our local Egypt internet service provider. I can only access this site via an "aircard" which grabs internet from the local cell phone towers. Here, it is insanely expensive because there is no such thing as unlimited use. C 'est la ve. If I spend $120+ a month to have normal internet, talk to my family and repair my credit, I justify the cost. But administrators: please fix this problem! I am sure the rest of Op. Enduring Freedom is in the dark unless they do something creative like this!

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Oh, and they lie, a lot, about nearly everything. Ask me how i know.

 

 

A-frickin-men.

 

And yeah, I'm nodding in agreement that many deployed troops have little to no access or time to deal with issues.

 

how do you know?

 

Some things CANT be told to anyone, including spouses. So some things are said to appease you.

Edited by lupoman

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Oh, and they lie, a lot, about nearly everything. Ask me how i know.

 

 

A-frickin-men.

 

And yeah, I'm nodding in agreement that many deployed troops have little to no access or time to deal with issues.

 

how do you know?

 

Some things CANT be told to anyone, including spouses. So some things are said to appease you.

 

 

How do I know what? That they lie? Because I've experienced it firsthand. That there are troops with no access to facilities or time to do anything but sleep? Because my husband lived that experience, twice. Because we know Marines who are currently deployed who spend little time on the FOB and when off the FOB have no internet access at all. :grin:

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Let me also say, that my best friend was deployed to Egypt, where the time difference is bad, about what I am dealing with today with a 6+ difference. We are ahead.

 

He only got 1 hour of internet time a day, due to the limited comps they had there, there was nearly always a line, so I only got to speak to him sporadically and then only in short burts. I also was up at like 2 in the morning to talk to him.

 

So you say that they have all this access but in my experience, it was limited access and is a privilage that is quite easily taken away.

 

And you want to talk about the lying, ok,

 

They give us OHA, for our rent, they are only giving us half this month because of some BS that THEY screwed up. They dont have our paperwork done and yet we have been here for three months. We had to take the Advance housing allowance to pay the first months rent (which we have to pay back at the tune of 300 a month) and also they have been late with the TLA which meant that I have to pay out 150 euro a night for 20 nights for the hotel that they chose for us. There is no room at the navy lodge for us to be at so finding a cheaper place is not an option.

You do not even want to know what we have had to spend out of pocket for this move and most of it because they are late or cant get anything done.

Anything that the military has set up or been in contol of has been fubared during the last 4 months.

 

So when i say that they are not the best avenue for financials I do have experience with this.

 

It is not easy to deal with thier BS, but to those who can successfully, I applaude you.

Edited by collins135

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Its a real sticky situation as a former Army Medic. It is so true that when your in the military everyone in the world is after your dough. Most Lower enlisted E-1 to E-4 are 18 to 21 years old fresh outta high school or college and single. They don't have credit or very little experience handling their own money. Creditors know the military gets paid on the 15th and the 30th of every month (hopefully). When your young and your trying to build credit and they can smell it on you. They offer you everything that they can till your all burdened up with debt. Upon deployment your told about how much contact you have with the civil world. It is not true. They tell you before you leave to have someone to be responsible for your finances. And in some cases if you talk to some creditors you can have the accounts and payments placed on hold or "Auto pay" during your tour of duty. I hate the idea of auto pay because thats like having a fox watch the hen house. "we'll take your minimum payment monthly automatically" Well Im pretty sure when you don't have contact with your account they can get a little frisky about how they apply items to your account.

 

The soldiers and sailors act was passed after the first Gulf war when all those National Guard and Reserve members came home to a world of ****. No job, Piles of debt, Jody moved in while your gone. And no protection. If you are currently a soldier I would suggest getting a great understanding of your rights under the Soldiers and Sailors Act. And talk to your creditors to see what your options are. Most of them probably don't give a crap about patriotism just getting paid. But I know USAA has clauses that protect soldiers in the event of deployment.

'

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We've known for quite a while that DH would be deploying early next year. He's in the National Guard, but has been on Active Duty since early this year in preparation for their mobilization/deployment. As soon as we had his active duty orders in hand, I sent SCRA requests with copies of his orders to our 3 main creditors. 2 were car loans and the third was to Saxon Mortgage. Saxon's was the only one that I sent via certified mail and even though it was signed for they said that they didn't receive it. I ended up faxing a copy to them which they acknowledged at the end of April, 2 weeks after the certified mail had been signed for. It took them until almost the end of July before they finished processing our request. When they received our request though, they reversed all of the payments that we had made back to March. That meant March, April and the May payment that I had just sent them. 3 months of payments not credited to our account. At the "high" point, they had 4 months of mortgage payments that they didn't apply to our account.

 

Since requesting relief under the SCRA, Saxon routinely charges miscellaneous fees to our account which I then have to call and ask about, then fax in a letter disputing the fee and pray that they remove it from our account. The one month it was $19 worth of property inspection fees and just this month it was $90 for a Broker Price Opinion. We've never been late in making our mortgage payment. We made the full regular payment through the whole 3 months of begging Saxon to get it done. They just kept putting it into a suspense account and our online account at one point showed as being over 100 days late. I went to JAG and the attorney there called Saxon on the phone and was treated much the same as I was when I called. They were rude and uncooperative, although they actually let him speak with a supervisor which they would always decline to do for me.

 

They've reduced our payment amount to what it would be if our loan was at 6% interest, but only credit the principal at our original 10.6% rate. The other 2 companies that I requested relief from made our interest rate 6%, so our principal payments on them are increased.

 

We're actually having to refinance to a 7.625% interest rate because we don't have enough equity in our home to do a VA refinance once the fees are added on. I had originally planned on refinancing once DH came home from deployment, but Saxon is obviously interested in making things more stressful for us instead of really helping a military family. I'm just hoping that we're able to get the refinance done before DH mobilizes next month.

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I can't believe that I forgot to add to my previous post that CB is not VIEWABLE here on our local Egypt internet service provider. I can only access this site via an "aircard" which grabs internet from the local cell phone towers. Here, it is insanely expensive because there is no such thing as unlimited use. C 'est la ve. If I spend $120+ a month to have normal internet, talk to my family and repair my credit, I justify the cost. But administrators: please fix this problem! I am sure the rest of Op. Enduring Freedom is in the dark unless they do something creative like this!

I can't believe you'd lump all of us in with your situation.

 

You have an EMPLOYER PAYING THE DIFFERENCE in what you make now and what you would have made. I have a wife at home, so my living expenses are the same, a car that blew up from a dealer that refused to honor the warranty while I am gone (and couldn't punch him in the face), and the added expenses of internet, SPAWAR phone time to call home, and an extreme amount of hygiene items for survival in this nasty place.

 

You have TIME ON YOUR HANDS, which is something I couldn't even dream of in Iraq. I had a half day off on July 6th. My last day off prior to that was 29 March (we deployed on 4 April).

 

Oh, yeah... YOU'RE ONLY IN EGYPT??? Your "Aircard" is $120/month? Our wireless internet is down 90% of the time, and it costs $75/month. We are thankful that they can prodive us internet in the middle of a combat zone 10% of the time, so we gladly line up to pay $75. The Mods have nothing to do with your ISP blocking CB, that's just how censorship works in other parts of the world. Next time you see that screen disallowing your CB pleasure, be reminded that we are fighting to ensure our families back home will never experience the same thing.

 

 

 

And y'all wonder why we say "friggin' reservists..." :D

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I joined the "military saves" program, but CB is the best program.

 

Guess who the spokes person for August was, none other than DR. In september, its Suze Orman. So yeah they have a program out there but it aint worth much.

 

Thier newsletter states this:

"Savers Tip

 

 

 

by TSgt Shaunta Hopson

 

 

 

I came into the Air Force at 23 years old in 1993 with about 12 outstanding bills (hospital bills, car loan, car insurance, school loans, credit cards, etc.). You name it, I had the bill. Thanks to the Family Support Center, Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace University, and many other sources, I now have no outstanding bills. I only have rent and utilities (not even a car payment). I want to help other military members get out of debt. I was able to pay off all my bills by year 1999. I used money from TDYs and deployments to pay off my bills from the least to the greatest principal. At the same time, I started building an Emergency Fund. Now I have the following:

 

A Good Basic Need Budgeting Plan

Money Market

Emergency Fund

Roth IRA

TSP

I hardly use credit cards and I access my credit report annually through www.annualcreditreport.com. This website is free unless you want your credit score along with it. The credit score costs about $5.00. I take whatever financial management information the military has to offer and apply them to my own financial management and it works. I am always willing to learn more and help other people get a handle on their finances.

 

TSgt Hopson's Tips: Use the money you get from TDYs and deployments to pay off your bills from the least to the greatest principal. Start building an emergency fund."

 

 

SO who on this board would say follow DR, read him, pay for his advice, dont use credit cards, and pay the lowest balances first??

Not many methinks.

 

We save every month, we also put 10% a month into TSP, we also have a good budget, dont see the need to follow all of their advice or to jump on the DR bandwagon when I got cb that is sooooo much better.

 

BTW: I tell everyone i know about CB when I can.

 

ETA:"Military Saves is also supported by Wells Fargo Bank, Chase Bank, and Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace University Military Edition. Together, we can build wealth, not debt! "

 

At the bottom of the newslwtter. :)

Edited by collins135

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In short, if a troop (and their spouse if they have one) practice money management skills at all times and set up a web bill pay prior to deploying, 99.9% of all problems will be avoided.

 

The ones who are saying that a member deploys and leaves no money behind for the spouse. That's a money management issue, aka the members fault. A troop makes more money being deployed vs. staying at the base. #1, every married member gets approx $280/mo BAS (food allowance). When not deployed, the troop will have to eat therefore uses money to pay for it. When you're deployed you get free food and still get paid that $280 BAS. You can also get tax free hostel fire pay, $225/mo. Lastly, when you return, you get tax free $250/mo for family separation. Lastly when deployed you get taxes taken out of your pay. ONce you arrive back at your base, you get a tax credit to equal "tax free".

 

We have a horrible pay system, DJMS. It's DOS based, everything is in arbitruary codes. DJMS piggybacks off of the personal computer system. Sometimes there's an error in the piggybacking. Eg, someone gets promoted, our DJMS isn't reading the new promotion. We're all going to have a new milpay system, therefore they won't spend another dime on improving DJMS. One last thing, we PAY GROSS and take back NET. That's a really bad thing IMO.

 

Have you ever LOOKED at an LES??? Yes they give us $250 BAS BUT they take out $230 WHETHER OR NOT my husband is deployed. That leaves only an extra $20 a month for food, not much (and payments for dental eat that up anyways). We dont see a dime of the BAH and we spend WAY more on uniforms a year then we get in stipend from them (roughly double of what they give). And they only give you seperation pay IF you have been seperated for more than 60 consecutive days. You get that but it takes them forever to get it to you, so it is not something you can count on as you never know when it will start or end. They will usually bring them back in on the 59th day to avoid paying it or send them out and bring them back in all the time. I have only spent 65 days with my husband this year and not consecutively, the rest he has been gone. We have not seen a penny of seperation pay this year. You do NOT get a tax credit after you come back from deployment (unless Iraq deploys have different rules) and navy doesn't get hostel fire pay no matter where they go. I have never seen any extra pay from the navy that they didnt give grudgingly. It took them nearly a year to give us BAH after we were married and they never back payed us either. When my husband made second class, it took them 6 months to pay him the extra 200 a month and he was never back payed to the day he got promoted either. there are too many rules and red tape for them to do anything.

 

99.9% of all problems are not avoided by simple money management. You need to have a POA for a lot and most companies will not accept a general. Companies such as KAY's Jewelers require a specific POA for me to even talk to them about my husband's account. I had to find that out the hard way. It is sooo frustrating when you are the one dealing with it and you can not get anything done. And Navy federal, as wonderful as they are, have to see the POA everytime I try to do something in his name even though I am joint on the account. They will not make a copy of it and keep it on file. I have to go into a branch and literally show them the copy for them to discuss certain things. We keep seperate credit accounts and I can not talk to the companies without faxing them the POA, talking to legal, and figuring out what companies require a specific POA. It is a PITA.

 

The only time we have had money issues on deployment has been when I pay the bills and my husband would look at our account and pull out whatever he wanted without knowing what bills I paid. So we had overdraft fees and all kinds of issues because HE spent the money while I was paying the bills. I am sure he told them it was all MY fault. That ended quickly because I put him on an allowance only giveing him so much allottment every month out of his paycheck. After he spent his money he had to call me and ask if there was enough in the account. This worked out better and never once have I had to turn him down for money. It really is more about the communication than the spending of the money. Once we worked out our goals and issues we began to grow more responsible financially.

 

Web Bill pay is the best thing in the world! We have not missed a payment since we started using it. The Legal services office is really helpful when doing the credit repair stuff and NMCRS was so helpful with the layette profram and budgeting/financial help. Sometimes the FFSC is helpful also.

 

Your DH's command sounds like a terrible one! The family separartion pay is something that will apply to me soon, as I am getting married this month and will deploy next month. I pray I don't have the same delay. But them bringing your DH back and forth so not to be obligated to Family Sep is ridiculous. As far as the BAH, they HAVE to back pay that. I have no idea how they're getting away with that. And yes, unfortunately, when your DH is frocked (promoted), he has to sign a form saying that he understands that he won't get paid for it for a long while. It's no fun. As far as the POA, I'll have to watch for that issue also. I hope you have good luck going after them on the BAH issue.

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We are FINALLY away from that command, and yes it was a terrible one. But the BAH not being given to us is like a 5 year old issue. I highly doubt they will ever give that to us.

They gave us a scare about a month ago though.

DH had to go to a school in order to get his current duty station. No problem with that, he got there and went to check in, but the day they brought him in, the office (PSD i believe) was closed. SO he goes in on the next day, turns his paperwork in, and does what he is supposed to do. He then proceeds to go to class every day for a week.

All of a sudden, we get a call from his mom that the mil is lloking for him. We are all like WTF, mate??? He has been there a week!! Some one in the office did not forward the paperwork across the street, so they listed him as AWOL and told us we would lose pay for a month. DH had to go straighten it all out and i waited on pins and needles to see if they were going to take the pay, for THEIR screwup! Luckily they didnt, I could have covered all of the bills but I was NOT happy about it.

It is just typical of the stuff they do.

This command seems to be better. So not all commands are so trying to deal with.

As for the POA, I suggest calling every account that you have and either authorizing your spouse to deal with the account or ask what they need to do so. That is the only thing that I can suggest. Also, a lot of things can be helped by the command but our command didnt seem to care.

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'Readiness Challenge' Helps Military Families with Finances

American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Oct. 28, 2008 -- Installation commanders from all military services and the Defense Department will begin conducting "Financial Readiness Challenge" events nationwide next week to help military families deal with the effects of today's economy.

 

Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., will host the first event Nov. 5 in partnership with the deputy undersecretary of defense for military community and family policy.

 

Together, installation commanders and DoD will bring a full range of local, state and federal resources to help military personnel and their families manage their finances effectively, officials said.

 

Event planners said the Financial Readiness Challenge events -- being conducted for the first time -- are paving the way for an expanding series of customized financial outreach efforts that address the unique issues military communities face.

 

"Each event is designed to help service personnel and family members make direct contact with local, state and federal subject matter experts -- financial counselors and educators," Lynda C. Davis, deputy undersecretary for military community and family policy, said. "These experts will provide information and assistance on such topics as budgets and spending plans, stretching your dollars to make ends meet, credit management, debt elimination, car buying, housing loans and foreclosures, savings and investments, and financial, estate and retirement planning."

 

Financial Readiness Challenge events include keynote speakers such as Public Television's Kelvin Boston and author and lecturer Brooke Stephens, as well as others who address topics such as credit scores and myths, the perils of debt and getting what you need and want in today's economy.

 

Hands-on workshop sessions will provide information on debt elimination, investing, car- and home-buying strategies, the Thrift Savings Plan and retirement planning, building a better budget and spending plan, paying for college, identity theft, credit reports, and what to do in today's economy, officials said.

 

Certified financial planners and counselors will answer questions and provide counseling services. Sign-ups for private counseling appointments will be available prior to and during each event.

 

Special financial education programs for children will be available at some Financial Challenge events, including Sammy Rabbit for younger children, Junior Achievement for older students and Jump $tart for all ages, including college. Child care by pre-registration also will be available at some events, officials said.

 

All workshops, counseling services and light refreshments will be provided at no cost to military personnel, their families and organizational representatives.

 

Financial Readiness Challenge events are scheduled at the following installations:

 

-- Air Force: Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., Nov 5; Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Nov. 13; Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 14-15; Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, week of Dec. 8; and Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., week of Feb 25.

 

-- Joint commands and Army: Fort Lewis and McChord Air Force Base, Wash., Dec. 4; Fort Belvoir, Va., Jan. 24; and Fort Polk, La., March 7.

 

-- Navy and Marine Corps: Base Consortium in San Diego Region, Calif., week of Feb. 25; Base Consortium in Norfolk, Va., Feb. 25; and Naval Base Kitsap, Wash., Feb. 23.

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'Readiness Challenge' Helps Military Families with Finances

American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Oct. 28, 2008 -- Installation commanders from all military services and the Defense Department will begin conducting "Financial Readiness Challenge" events nationwide next week to help military families deal with the effects of today's economy.

 

Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., will host the first event Nov. 5 in partnership with the deputy undersecretary of defense for military community and family policy.

 

Together, installation commanders and DoD will bring a full range of local, state and federal resources to help military personnel and their families manage their finances effectively, officials said.

 

Event planners said the Financial Readiness Challenge events -- being conducted for the first time -- are paving the way for an expanding series of customized financial outreach efforts that address the unique issues military communities face.

 

"Each event is designed to help service personnel and family members make direct contact with local, state and federal subject matter experts -- financial counselors and educators," Lynda C. Davis, deputy undersecretary for military community and family policy, said. "These experts will provide information and assistance on such topics as budgets and spending plans, stretching your dollars to make ends meet, credit management, debt elimination, car buying, housing loans and foreclosures, savings and investments, and financial, estate and retirement planning."

 

Financial Readiness Challenge events include keynote speakers such as Public Television's Kelvin Boston and author and lecturer Brooke Stephens, as well as others who address topics such as credit scores and myths, the perils of debt and getting what you need and want in today's economy.

 

Hands-on workshop sessions will provide information on debt elimination, investing, car- and home-buying strategies, the Thrift Savings Plan and retirement planning, building a better budget and spending plan, paying for college, identity theft, credit reports, and what to do in today's economy, officials said.

 

Certified financial planners and counselors will answer questions and provide counseling services. Sign-ups for private counseling appointments will be available prior to and during each event.

 

Special financial education programs for children will be available at some Financial Challenge events, including Sammy Rabbit for younger children, Junior Achievement for older students and Jump $tart for all ages, including college. Child care by pre-registration also will be available at some events, officials said.

 

All workshops, counseling services and light refreshments will be provided at no cost to military personnel, their families and organizational representatives.

 

Financial Readiness Challenge events are scheduled at the following installations:

 

-- Air Force: Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., Nov 5; Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Nov. 13; Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 14-15; Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, week of Dec. 8; and Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., week of Feb 25.

 

-- Joint commands and Army: Fort Lewis and McChord Air Force Base, Wash., Dec. 4; Fort Belvoir, Va., Jan. 24; and Fort Polk, La., March 7.

 

-- Navy and Marine Corps: Base Consortium in San Diego Region, Calif., week of Feb. 25; Base Consortium in Norfolk, Va., Feb. 25; and Naval Base Kitsap, Wash., Feb. 23.

 

 

Good find Collins. :lol:

 

I'm AD AF with 3 kids and a non working wife. Been that way since I've been E-3. I'm now an E-5 with just 5 years in. If anyone wants any help on how to properly budget and still have money left over just let me know. I have a cool excel budget sheet that I use that keeps us on track (I can send you a copy as well). Honestly, it's really just about priorities...even with E-1 pay. The only exception I can think that would still make you not have enough money is when DFAS messes up your paycheck. But even then, the budget minded person should have funds set aside in savings and a credit card or two to fall back on. It's possible, trust me I've done it. Just ask! :D

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Good find Collins. :mellow:

 

I'm AD AF with 3 kids and a non working wife. Been that way since I've been E-3. I'm now an E-5 with just 5 years in. If anyone wants any help on how to properly budget and still have money left over just let me know. I have a cool excel budget sheet that I use that keeps us on track (I can send you a copy as well). Honestly, it's really just about priorities...even with E-1 pay. The only exception I can think that would still make you not have enough money is when DFAS messes up your paycheck. But even then, the budget minded person should have funds set aside in savings and a credit card or two to fall back on. It's possible, trust me I've done it. Just ask! B)

 

To me, its not so much the budgeting that is the issue. It is more along the lines of:

 

--- open communication---- spouse and Servicemember need to be on the same page about money, accounts, goals, and paymnts/spending

 

----POA--- non deploying spouse needs to either be an AU on all accounts or to have POA for all accounts and needs to know which companies require specific POA's.

 

----paperwork---- nothing you can do but the military is mostly paperwork, and they dont like to do it very fast or well in some cases.

 

----commands--- if you get a bad one its *heck* (except worse) when you get no help or info from the commands, they make things that much harder.

 

Im not saying that the military is awful, but they are not perfect and they are not easy to deal with at times. Deployments are hard in many ways and financially it is not always great. People who say you never run into problems by simply budgeting or simply having a POA or simply anything are wrong. Nothing is ever that simple and take into account Murphy's law, and you got a lot than can (and some of it has for me) gone wrong.

 

Yes budgeting helps and yes having an emergency fund helps, but that doesnt mean that a problem will not arise, nor does it mean the problem will be about the amount of money you have. Sometimes the problem is not under your control and is not even your fault but must be dealt with none the less. And being the one left behind to deal with an issue and not have all of the tools needed to deal with it, is frustrating.

 

That is why I advocate the things I do. From my experiences I hope that others will know to get that POA and make sure that you can deal with all of the accounts, i hope people will get on a budget, will get that emergency fund, will know the resources to go to when they dont have enough money or have issues. For some things I have faced, there were rescources out there but I was never informed so now I tell others about what I have found.

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Good find Collins. :lol:

 

I'm AD AF with 3 kids and a non working wife. Been that way since I've been E-3. I'm now an E-5 with just 5 years in. If anyone wants any help on how to properly budget and still have money left over just let me know. I have a cool excel budget sheet that I use that keeps us on track (I can send you a copy as well). Honestly, it's really just about priorities...even with E-1 pay. The only exception I can think that would still make you not have enough money is when DFAS messes up your paycheck. But even then, the budget minded person should have funds set aside in savings and a credit card or two to fall back on. It's possible, trust me I've done it. Just ask! :lol:

 

To me, its not so much the budgeting that is the issue. It is more along the lines of:

 

--- open communication---- spouse and Servicemember need to be on the same page about money, accounts, goals, and paymnts/spending

 

----POA--- non deploying spouse needs to either be an AU on all accounts or to have POA for all accounts and needs to know which companies require specific POA's.

 

----paperwork---- nothing you can do but the military is mostly paperwork, and they dont like to do it very fast or well in some cases.

 

----commands--- if you get a bad one its *heck* (except worse) when you get no help or info from the commands, they make things that much harder.

 

Im not saying that the military is awful, but they are not perfect and they are not easy to deal with at times. Deployments are hard in many ways and financially it is not always great. People who say you never run into problems by simply budgeting or simply having a POA or simply anything are wrong. Nothing is ever that simple and take into account Murphy's law, and you got a lot than can (and some of it has for me) gone wrong.

 

Yes budgeting helps and yes having an emergency fund helps, but that doesnt mean that a problem will not arise, nor does it mean the problem will be about the amount of money you have. Sometimes the problem is not under your control and is not even your fault but must be dealt with none the less. And being the one left behind to deal with an issue and not have all of the tools needed to deal with it, is frustrating.

 

That is why I advocate the things I do. From my experiences I hope that others will know to get that POA and make sure that you can deal with all of the accounts, i hope people will get on a budget, will get that emergency fund, will know the resources to go to when they dont have enough money or have issues. For some things I have faced, there were rescources out there but I was never informed so now I tell others about what I have found.

 

 

I agree with the first 3 points. I don't know how it is in the Army, but Air Force has centralized their pay people into one central location for the entire service. The commands have no involvement what so ever (with the exception of verifying that you're entitled to Family Sep, Haz Duty, etc. pays on TDYs and Deployments). Go green to blue! lol

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Good find Collins. :blush:

 

I'm AD AF with 3 kids and a non working wife. Been that way since I've been E-3. I'm now an E-5 with just 5 years in. If anyone wants any help on how to properly budget and still have money left over just let me know. I have a cool excel budget sheet that I use that keeps us on track (I can send you a copy as well). Honestly, it's really just about priorities...even with E-1 pay. The only exception I can think that would still make you not have enough money is when DFAS messes up your paycheck. But even then, the budget minded person should have funds set aside in savings and a credit card or two to fall back on. It's possible, trust me I've done it. Just ask! :o

 

To me, its not so much the budgeting that is the issue. It is more along the lines of:

 

--- open communication---- spouse and Servicemember need to be on the same page about money, accounts, goals, and paymnts/spending

 

----POA--- non deploying spouse needs to either be an AU on all accounts or to have POA for all accounts and needs to know which companies require specific POA's.

 

----paperwork---- nothing you can do but the military is mostly paperwork, and they dont like to do it very fast or well in some cases.

 

----commands--- if you get a bad one its *heck* (except worse) when you get no help or info from the commands, they make things that much harder.

 

Im not saying that the military is awful, but they are not perfect and they are not easy to deal with at times. Deployments are hard in many ways and financially it is not always great. People who say you never run into problems by simply budgeting or simply having a POA or simply anything are wrong. Nothing is ever that simple and take into account Murphy's law, and you got a lot than can (and some of it has for me) gone wrong.

 

Yes budgeting helps and yes having an emergency fund helps, but that doesnt mean that a problem will not arise, nor does it mean the problem will be about the amount of money you have. Sometimes the problem is not under your control and is not even your fault but must be dealt with none the less. And being the one left behind to deal with an issue and not have all of the tools needed to deal with it, is frustrating.

 

That is why I advocate the things I do. From my experiences I hope that others will know to get that POA and make sure that you can deal with all of the accounts, i hope people will get on a budget, will get that emergency fund, will know the resources to go to when they dont have enough money or have issues. For some things I have faced, there were rescources out there but I was never informed so now I tell others about what I have found.

 

 

I agree with the first 3 points. I don't know how it is in the Army, but Air Force has centralized their pay people into one central location for the entire service. The commands have no involvement what so ever (with the exception of verifying that you're entitled to Family Sep, Haz Duty, etc. pays on TDYs and Deployments). Go green to blue! lol

 

Didnt say the command had anything to do with getting your pay to you. But they do have a lot to do with COMMUNICATING with you, especially when you have a deployed spouse and an emergency arises. When you have an emergency you contact the omsbudsman and they contact the command, but when the command refuses to reply or communicate with the omsbudsman or you, refuses to support a family readiness group and refuses all attempts to help support the families in any way, then you have a bad command who adds to the issues. I have actually had to go to the commander of his squadren to get things done. Me and her had a great relationship and it eventually got to the point that I had to go straight to her because the command was crap and was so unwilling to even acknowledge that the familes existed. So yes the command actually can hurt you, especially when they do not allow you to communicate with your member and they do not submit or fill out the paperwork that you need.

And here, you cant do layaway without the commands signature. (NEX)

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I had a huge question that I needed an answer to, and if I'm correct I'll be pretty excited. I am active duty and I had a vehicle that I had financed at 24.99% due to bad credit and defaulted student loans. Well I had that car for about a year and a half and then I was hit by a drunk driver and almost lost my life. NE ways his insurance companied took forever to pay my car off and accumulated tons of late fees. They paid the car off at 24.99%. Now since I got the car before I went active and therate never changed after that, due they owe me the overages since the rate should have changed to 6 % maybe a month after I had gotten it? Please let me know - this informaion would bereally appreciated to help my family stay on its feet.

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If you and/or your spouse (if applicable) entered into a contract for the car before entering active duty, the SCRA relief will apply. You have to notify them in writing.

 

Almost all lenders will require you to send a copy of your orders proving the date you entered active duty. You can do this as late as 180 days after leaving active duty. They will also verify your active duty status here: https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/scra/owa/home

 

Once they process your adjustment, it will date back to the first day you reported to active duty. They must FORGIVE the excess interest above 6%.

 

This is section 527 of the SCRA: http://www.defenselink.mil/ra/mobil/pdf/scra.pdf

 

§ 527. Maximum rate of interest on debts incurred before military service

[sec. 207]

(a) Interest rate limitation

(1) Limitation to 6 percent

An obligation or liability bearing interest at a rate in excess of 6 percent per year that is incurred by a

servicemember, or the servicemember and the servicemember's spouse jointly, before the servicemember

enters military service shall not bear interest at a rate in excess of 6 percent per year during the period of

military service.

(2) Forgiveness of interest in excess of 6 percent

Interest at a rate in excess of 6 percent per year that would otherwise be incurred but for the prohibition in

paragraph (1) is forgiven.

(3) Prevention of acceleration of principal

The amount of any periodic payment due from a servicemember under the terms of the instrument that

created an obligation or liability covered by this section shall be reduced by the amount of the interest

forgiven under paragraph (2) that is allocable to the period for which such payment is made.

(;) Implementation of limitation

(1) Written notice to creditor

In order for an obligation or liability of a servicemember to be subject to the interest rate limitation in

subsection (a), the servicemember shall provide to the creditor written notice and a copy of the military

orders calling the servicemember to military service and any orders further extending military service, not

later than 180 days after the date of the servicemember's termination or release from military service.

(2) Limitation effective as of date of order to active duty

Upon receipt of written notice and a copy of orders calling a servicemember to military service, the creditor

shall treat the debt in accordance with subsection (a), effective as of the date on which the servicemember

is called to military service.

© Creditor protection

A court may grant a creditor relief from the limitations of this section if, in the opinion of the court, the

ability of the servicemember to pay interest upon the obligation or liability at a rate in excess of 6 percent

per year is not materially affected by reason of the servicemember's military service.

(d) Interest

As used in this section, the term "interest" includes service charges, renewal charges, fees, or any other

charges (except bona fide insurance) with respect to an obligation or liability.

 

 

I am glad you are okay. Thanks for your service!

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You need to go see JAG on that since the act is one you must invoke. Since you did not invoke it at that time you may not be able to invoke it now when the situation is as it is.

Go see JAG and let them work with you on it before you start writing the lender letters. Lenders do not know much about the act but jag will be able to help you.

 

Good luck to you and yours!

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Collins,

 

I don't believe JAG is necessary at all. Have you tried to get a JAG appointment lately? It takes forever to get in for help. I say let him write the letters and if there are any problems, know that JAG can help assert his rights if anyone gives him a problem.

 

Also, he can wait until up to 180 days after leaving active duty to invoke his rights of the SCRA. Of course, the sooner the better -- but the lack of notification before now does not waive his right to his benefit.

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Actually, JAG would be better to contact first, since this matter has been setteled (as in the note is no longer being paid for) and the act was not invoked at the time the note was active. This is invoking the act after the fact when all has been said and done. I have not personally seen such a case come in nor do I personally see the act being used in this fashion.

 

"© Creditor protection

A court may grant a creditor relief from the limitations of this section if, in the opinion of the court, the

ability of the servicemember to pay interest upon the obligation or liability at a rate in excess of 6 percent

per year is not materially affected by reason of the servicemember's military service."

 

States that he could be liable if the military did not in fact affect his ablity to pay the note, which it is not now since the note is all ready paid and all actions were in the past.

 

And at this point, it looks (no offense but my job is to look at both sides) like he is grasping at straws on this issue to find a way to recoup some money.

 

And yes, I know how the JAg is since I work there. But since this case is so old and is not being paid on then he has time.

If he is banking on the fact that he thinks they owe him money then he should be aware that it would take time anyways to figure it out and they just arent going to cut a check if they get a letter.

If you are in a hard finiancial situation you need to find a better solution than dragging up old issues to bring money in. You need to tap other rescources available.

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Collins,

 

First and foremost, you are bringing up very valid points. For instance, the SM should not use this as a way to tap additional money if times are tough. However, I do NOT agree that he lost his right to the benefit because he was unaware of its existence until now.

 

I agree that JAG would be helpful in his case, but I just didn't want him (or others) to believe that JAG would be REQUIRED for any SCRA issues to be resolved.

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No Jag is not required to invoke SCRA issues. However, this situation is very different from the usual issues. I didnt say he has lost any rights either.

All I am saying is that this is on a closed account that has been paid for and is not affecting his ability to pay the loan NOW. The act is typically used on accounts that are open and have a balance due. Not on accounts that were closed and paid off. I personally have not seen a case where a member got paid money back AFTER the loan was closed and paid.

If this went to court, I see it being hard to prove that his military service affected his ability to pay if the loan was current during the year and a half he had the vehicle. The fact that it incurred late charges is inmaterial here because it was the person who held the note's responsibility to continue to pay the note on time, and not bank on the insurance to pay it regardless of the condition of the vehicle.

Additionaly, the last line of the post concerns me. Even if he were to get back paid for the issue, it would not be an immediate payment and likely the lender will put up a fight due to the reasons I have brought up a) the loan is closed and not affecting his ability to pay currently :aggressive: the rights were not invoked before the closure of the loan and c) it looks like this is a desperate attempt to get money for "nothing". If the letter comes from JAG, it is less likely that on this issue, the lender would put up much of a fight knowing that the SM is backed up with legal representation (free at that!).

Also, JAG would be better able to advise him on his situation and point him to resources that are located on his base and area.

 

Typicaly, no, you dont need JAG to help you with SCRA issues. However, this situation is a little different and I would seek legal advice before sending out letters and betting your financial well being on a "gamble". This is not a way to bring money in, if you get money then great! That is awesome!! However, if you are having financial issues then this wont "fix" things. Its best to get legal help and to find all resources available to you.

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