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Equifax won't accept my disputes by mail


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Has anyone experienced this? I send two disputes to Experian by mail (and I green card them). Only to have my dispute letter returned in the mail...saying they won't accept. This is strange this hasn't happened to me before.

 

Is there a new address for Experian? and does anyone have their customer hotline number?

 

 

Thanks

 

Keam

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What were their reasons for not accepting it?

 

Also, I recently mailed a dispute to the following address. The address was valid.

 

EQUIFAX INFORMATION SERVICES LLC

P O BOX 740256

ATLANTA,GA-30374

Edited by CCK2006
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There was no reason listed....I just get this orange slip from the post office saying letter was returned. I checked the address serveral times and no luck. Are they trying to encourage people to use online service??? Not certain what I should do next?

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Has anyone experienced this? I send two disputes to Experian by mail (and I green card them). Only to have my dispute letter returned in the mail...saying they won't accept. This is strange this hasn't happened to me before.

 

Is there a new address for Experian? and does anyone have their customer hotline number?

 

 

Thanks

 

Keam

 

Your subject mentioned EQ but your post discusses EX...which one is creating the problems? It makes a big difference.

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Has anyone experienced this? I send two disputes to Experian by mail (and I green card them). Only to have my dispute letter returned in the mail...saying they won't accept. This is strange this hasn't happened to me before.

 

Is there a new address for Experian? and does anyone have their customer hotline number?

 

 

Thanks

 

Keam

 

Which address did you send the letters to?

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With PO boxes, you might want to try just sending by certified mail (no RRR). If you CMRRR, then someone has to sign for it, and the PO often stops trying after two notices. If the people picking up the mail ignore the slips, then the letter goes back as undeliverable.

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I think the green cards from the CRAs are overrated. Sending by certified mail still yields the online tracking receipt, and since delivery to a POB ends at the POB, the CRAs would be hard-pressed to deny it was received if you produce the tracking info. Further, if you end up needing a receipt, I believe the PO can produce one after the fact for a $5 fee. (Not a signature, but a certification it was delivered.) Obviously, if it's an ITS or something, the green card might be more important, but for general disputes, certified mail should be sufficient.

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I think the green cards from the CRAs are overrated. Sending by certified mail still yields the online tracking receipt, and since delivery to a POB ends at the POB, the CRAs would be hard-pressed to deny it was received if you produce the tracking info. Further, if you end up needing a receipt, I believe the PO can produce one after the fact for a $5 fee. (Not a signature, but a certification it was delivered.) Obviously, if it's an ITS or something, the green card might be more important, but for general disputes, certified mail should be sufficient.

I understand your point. However, it is so much easier with a signature from the start, particularly in court.

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I agree for court, but unless one is about to sue, it's easier and cheaper to just go the CM route. The extra $2-plus for the green card per dispute also starts to add up and is probably not necessary the majority of the time (esp. with PO boxes).

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I agree for court, but unless one is about to sue, it's easier and cheaper to just go the CM route. The extra $2-plus for the green card per dispute also starts to add up and is probably not necessary the majority of the time (esp. with PO boxes).

 

 

You must assume that you will have to go to court every time you send a dispute.

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I don't agree about not sending RRR.  I have sent out tons of disputes to all 3 CRA, and have always had them come back as signed.  If you don't send RRR, you don't have that paper trail.

 

 

Generally speaking, I send my letters Certified, with no RRR. Then, a few days after sending, I go to www.usps.com, search for the receipt number, and then print out the page that says when and where the item was delivered.

 

It saves a little bit of money, especially when sending a lot of letters, and I still get confirmation from the post office that the item went where I said it was going.

 

Does that sound logical, or am I just blowing sunshine up my own ___?

Edited by prcaz
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It sounds logical to me. If USPS tracking says it was delivered, then it will most likely be considered delivered in about 98 out of 100 jurisdictions (if not 100/100). In some places, legal service only needs to be sent by regular mail, so a certified mail tracking confirmation should suffice in the vast majority of cases, especially to secure PO boxes.

 

As for printing the USPS tracking info., you can actually enter your email address at the USPS site and USPS will email the tracking info as soon as the letter is delivered. Very convenient.

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You might wish to take a look at the thread about "new disputing rules".

 

CMRR mail is sent to a servicing area for disputes that are presumed to come from CRO's and your dispute to the CRA, although "legally" trackable, will likely not work as well as a plain certified mail letter.

 

Additionally, although the CRA has a legal obligation to accept ALL mail sent to it, there is NO legal obligation for them to "staff" their mail "pick-up" people with someone who is authorized to sign for CMRR mail at the PO, so they do NOT have to sign for it in a timely way as long as regular mail is deliverable.

 

The ONLY time anyone CRA or otherwise can be cited for "refusal" to accept mail is if it is to a regular office address, and they REFUSE to sign for it.

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