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devious9191

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  1. If your paper copy says the correct date of the late payment, that should be the end of it. These online deals are better than nothing when checking your credit score, but not by much. I would also suggest that even if it was wrong, I don't think you're going to see much a score difference between 2 years 4 months and 4 years 11 months for one late payment
  2. The assumption is that you 'forgot' to call the hotel to let them know that you didn't pay for your $100 bar tab as well when you saw that you had an extra $100 in your budget that month? Edit -- Also, if you were to chargeback this amount and were successful, that would not remove your obligation to pay the debt to the hotel. I'm sure that those clients whose credit cards have been declined will be getting letters in the mail
  3. That would require new legislation, right? No, that is how many see their AMEX charge card today. Since you highlighted the "excellent chargeback rights" if you were questioning what is meant by that, AMEX almost always takes the side of the consumer in such situations. As someone that gets the pleasure of dealing with chargebacks on a daily basis, in my industry I've found the opposite to be true. As a merchant, I win many more Amex chargebacks than Visa/MC. Of course, most chargebacks are people trying to lie their way out of paying their bills, so maybe Amex does do a better job with 'legitimate' chargebacks than Visa/MC.. would be interesting to find out :0 YMMV In the hotel industry, we never even bothered replying to Amex chargebacks since we always lost. (This was for room "No shows" though). I actually work in the hotel industry myself, and no-shows were what I was thinking of when I used the example. We actually win quite a few of them with Amex. In addition, with the particular hotel chain that I work for it's against company policy to take signatures or credit card imprints -- which can make chargebacks for people that actually stayed at the hotel more challenging than it should be. But you're right, I'm sure it is YMMV --but my experience has been a bit different than what most people get I guess
  4. Maybe it's like insurance? Women get a 10 point bump for managing finances better than men
  5. That would require new legislation, right? No, that is how many see their AMEX charge card today. Since you highlighted the "excellent chargeback rights" if you were questioning what is meant by that, AMEX almost always takes the side of the consumer in such situations. As someone that gets the pleasure of dealing with chargebacks on a daily basis, in my industry I've found the opposite to be true. As a merchant, I win many more Amex chargebacks than Visa/MC. Of course, most chargebacks are people trying to lie their way out of paying their bills, so maybe Amex does do a better job with 'legitimate' chargebacks than Visa/MC.. would be interesting to find out :0
  6. Even if they had a receipt saying that the rent was 'paid', if they never cash the check that doesn't mean that you no longer owe the money. I don't believe that they should make the OP fork over another rent payment before they are able to cancel the check with their bank, but the OP definitely should not be able to cancel the check after 90 days and make out with a free month's rent either -- and I think they would have a very difficult time convincing a judge that they should
  7. I think you know that that isn't true...
  8. That is exactly what it is. I'm taking courses at the local community college (also in Texas) for a CPA that I'm working on, and they have the same program. They give you a prepaid debit card, and your student loan funds are loaded onto the card. This essentially creates a checking account with their bank, and you can login to their website to access your funds and that sort of thing. You do have the option to have that money automatically forwarded to a checking account that you own, but it goes to their bank first. It can be a bit of pain in the flowers, but there aren't any extra fees involved.
  9. I used to survey for a living, so maybe can help a bit. I would definitely recommend hiring one, particularly if you are going to put up a fence. The cost of moving a fence because your GPS was out a couple of inches can run into the thousands of dollars. If you try and sell your property down the line and your fence is encroaching on the neighbours property, this will cause title problems That being said, if you have a recently surveyed lot, or are in a new subdivision, your survey is going to be easier than someone in an older area. The cost is going to be dependent on the area, but you're probably looking at $500 or so if you just need someone to stake out the back of your lot Edit - if you do happen to find your own stakes, don't take them as being gospel. Stakes move/get moved over time, and the argument that you thought you were using the right stakes doesn't count for much when you're moving a fence.
  10. It's a 'for profit' business like any other. Some people 'need' those loans for legitimate reasons, and this service is there when traditional lenders would not be. A part of the reason that the fees are so damn high are the number of people that default on them, which I'm sure that you know already. The fees are also high because the size of the loans are typically very small, and there are costs involved with trying to collect on them when they inevitably default. I doubt that many payday loan franchisees are becoming millionaires by scamming the 'innocent consumers' Guess again http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa40...ag=content;col1 Maybe you could provide a study showing otherwise? In an instant "Cash-strapped Oklahomans are using controversial payday loan services despite high interest rates, borrowing $75 million and paying more than $10 million in fees during a four-month period this year, records show." http://www.captc.org/pubpol/Payday_Lending...dec_20_2004.pdf I was sort of thinking of something that shows how much of that revenue actually makes it to the owners. Noone is debating that payday loan places charge high fees. I am saying that the fees are exorbitant because the cost of business is also very high in this industry. You will notice that the documentation I linked shows that clearly, while yours doesn't make mention of it at all... I understand that payday loan places are politicians favorite whipping boys, but that doesn't mean you have to buy what they are selling without doing some of your own research. what are you talking about? you said you don't think they make millions, they do. If you don't believe it do your own research. Well, I'm not going to try and explain to you how the money that someone takes in at the cash register doesn't go directly to the owner's bank account. I have already shown you that the profit margin for these places is about 3.5%. What that means is that for every $100 the owner puts into the business, he can expect a return of $3.50. How many payday loans do you think a money mart or similar would need to make to earn a million dollars for the owner at $3.50 per hundred dollars? Per the link that you provided, the average loan amount is $305.00. For a franchisee to earn $50,000 - he would need to lend $1,428,571 at 3.5%. At an average loan of $305.00 -- that is 4684 loans! To earn a million dollars, it is almost 94,000 loans. So no, these people do not make millions. They make average amounts of money serving people that often have no other alternative.
  11. It's a 'for profit' business like any other. Some people 'need' those loans for legitimate reasons, and this service is there when traditional lenders would not be. A part of the reason that the fees are so damn high are the number of people that default on them, which I'm sure that you know already. The fees are also high because the size of the loans are typically very small, and there are costs involved with trying to collect on them when they inevitably default. I doubt that many payday loan franchisees are becoming millionaires by scamming the 'innocent consumers' Guess again http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa40...ag=content;col1 Maybe you could provide a study showing otherwise? In an instant "Cash-strapped Oklahomans are using controversial payday loan services despite high interest rates, borrowing $75 million and paying more than $10 million in fees during a four-month period this year, records show." http://www.captc.org/pubpol/Payday_Lending...dec_20_2004.pdf I was sort of thinking of something that shows how much of that revenue actually makes it to the owners. Noone is debating that payday loan places charge high fees. I am saying that the fees are exorbitant because the cost of business is also very high in this industry. You will notice that the documentation I linked shows that clearly, while yours doesn't make mention of it at all... I understand that payday loan places are politicians favorite whipping boys, but that doesn't mean you have to buy what they are selling without doing some of your own research.
  12. It's a 'for profit' business like any other. Some people 'need' those loans for legitimate reasons, and this service is there when traditional lenders would not be. A part of the reason that the fees are so damn high are the number of people that default on them, which I'm sure that you know already. The fees are also high because the size of the loans are typically very small, and there are costs involved with trying to collect on them when they inevitably default. I doubt that many payday loan franchisees are becoming millionaires by scamming the 'innocent consumers' Guess again http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa40...ag=content;col1 Maybe you could provide a study showing otherwise?
  13. It's a 'for profit' business like any other. Some people 'need' those loans for legitimate reasons, and this service is there when traditional lenders would not be. A part of the reason that the fees are so damn high are the number of people that default on them, which I'm sure that you know already. The fees are also high because the size of the loans are typically very small, and there are costs involved with trying to collect on them when they inevitably default. I doubt that many payday loan franchisees are becoming millionaires by scamming the 'innocent consumers'
  14. I can't think of the name of the exact service, but in Canada you can 'email' funds to another person, which is a really neat system. Essentially the sender would initiate the transfer through his bank, just putting in the email address of the person they wanted to send money to and the amount. The recipient receives the email, which links them to the senders bank. They enter in their account # and routing # and what not, and the money is transferred within a couple of days. Worked very well for the couple of times I needed to use it

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