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Grizzly Bear

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  1. Yeah,I have been asked 4 times out of 20 hotels. When I ask why, the answer was the same every time - it was to verify that the credit card was legit. Also, the fact that many do not require ID seems to indicate that they are not so vulnerable as the pro-ID folks would have us believe.
  2. What has been your experience with hotels in regard to credit cards and ID requirements? What I have noticed is that 80% do not ask for ID. Perhaps this is because we book online with a loyalty card, but we also have not been hassled at the "mom & pops". It seems to me that since so many do not require it, they are probably doing just fine as is. We have been to Best Western, LaQuinta, Comfort Inn and Quality Inn and 80% of the time we are not hassled. When I write to Visa to file a complaint, they send me the same letter they send as if it were any other type of business, saying they will take action. If there were a chain we could count on to treat us with respect (no demand for ID) then they would have our loyalty.
  3. ID checks are wrong for several reasons. 1) The premise that they protect the cardholder at all is false. Since most merchants don't check (and most places never will check because MC and Visa rules prohibit it unless the card is unsigned), anyone with a stolen card can find plenty of places to max out a card. 2) As previously stated, MC and Visa prohibit the practice. Most merchants that check ID are unaware of this. Violators can be reported, fined, or suspended. 3) Much of the fraud can be prevented by people taking responsibility for their own cards and not asking everyone else to look out for them with useless ID checks. 4) Many of us are greatly annoyed with the practice of a merchant trying to assert authority over us when we are spending our money at their stores. If someone doesn't want to show ID their wishes should be respected, especially since MC and Visa rules are on their side.
  4. enjoyment? nope. if the merchant thinks I am a thief they should call the police. accusing me of using someone's credit card is not tolerated. Do you hide from the security cameras, refusing to be filmed as well? Refuse to walk through the alarm system at the exit because it offends your honor? Almost every merchant assumes you're a thief the second you step through the door, until the second you leave. Probably shouldn't shop online either, as they all store your IP address, which is your online ID. Probably should never sign your signature for anything either, as everyone should just assume you are who you say you are. Maybe next time something happens to your web browser and you have to log in to credit boards, you can raise a stink because they asked you for your password. While some of the things you mentioned are things I could care less about, ID with a credit card is particularly disrespectful. When a customer walks into a store to give them business and spend one's hard earned money, the last thing a customer deserves is the presumption of being a criminal. Past generations have understood this, but with younger generations it seems courtesy and respect are not high on the list of priorities. Also, requests for ID are just the latest in the increasing list of ways in which every aspect of our lives our being policed. Whether it's new laws to govern every little aspect of our life, hassles, hoops to jump through for everything, etc, some of us are are sick of it. ID is just another in a long list of recent annoyances. I guess you're assuming I'm young. I'm 33 for what it's worth. No idea where you're drawing the line on the whole disrespect thing. The merchant places cameras and alarms because they assume criminals are trying to steal from them. That's the society we live in. Don't blame the merchants, blame the thieves. Most people are not thieves, sure...but the merchant has no way of knowing. I simply don't take it personal, it isn't. The store is there to make money, and in order to do that, they must protect their assets. If you were paying cash, or bartering goods like the old days, sure...no need for ID. But you're handing the merchant what basically equates to a note from your parents saying they'll get paid, not to worry. I assume you wrote checks from the generational comment. Was it disrepectful for these same merchants to ask for ID's when you wrote checks? I simply equate the two as being equal. Neither seems disrespectful to me. I expect please and thank you's, and common courtesy. I don't expect strangers to know who I am. Most stores do make money taking credit cards. And the combination of respecting the customer (as they have in the past and most still do) and honoring a contract which the merchant agreed to seems to be the obvious right thing to do.
  5. enjoyment? nope. if the merchant thinks I am a thief they should call the police. accusing me of using someone's credit card is not tolerated. Do you hide from the security cameras, refusing to be filmed as well? Refuse to walk through the alarm system at the exit because it offends your honor? Almost every merchant assumes you're a thief the second you step through the door, until the second you leave. Probably shouldn't shop online either, as they all store your IP address, which is your online ID. Probably should never sign your signature for anything either, as everyone should just assume you are who you say you are. Maybe next time something happens to your web browser and you have to log in to credit boards, you can raise a stink because they asked you for your password. While some of the things you mentioned are things I could care less about, ID with a credit card is particularly disrespectful. When a customer walks into a store to give them business and spend one's hard earned money, the last thing a customer deserves is the presumption of being a criminal. Past generations have understood this, but with younger generations it seems courtesy and respect are not high on the list of priorities. Also, requests for ID are just the latest in the increasing list of ways in which every aspect of our lives our being policed. Whether it's new laws to govern every little aspect of our life, hassles, hoops to jump through for everything, etc, some of us are are sick of it. ID is just another in a long list of recent annoyances.
  6. You don't have to show your receipt. Just say "sorry, I don't have time" and continue walking (polite way to do it), or just walk out ignoring the receipt checker. Actually, at the warehouse clubs, you don't get that option if you want to be a member any longer. Their club, their rules... My stuff, my life. Not when you enter THEIR club...and not when you joined THEIR club. You entered into the contract with them to abide by THEIR rules. Wel, well!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Look who's talking about a contract!!!!!! I actually didn't sign a contract. I don't do warehouse clubs for that very reason. Their loss. Ironic on your part though. No it isn;t ironic... In the case of a warehouse club, the customer is a party to the contract by having agreed to the terms. The customer is NOT a party to merchant agreements and thus lacks standing to play the aggrieved whiny-flowers. Actually, a party who did enter the contract encourages us to let them know about violations and many of us who are aware of this are quite happy to do so.
  7. You don't have to show your receipt. Just say "sorry, I don't have time" and continue walking (polite way to do it), or just walk out ignoring the receipt checker. Actually, at the warehouse clubs, you don't get that option if you want to be a member any longer. Their club, their rules... My stuff, my life. Not when you enter THEIR club...and not when you joined THEIR club. You entered into the contract with them to abide by THEIR rules. Wel, well!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Look who's talking about a contract!!!!!! I actually didn't sign a contract. I don't do warehouse clubs for that very reason. Their loss. Ironic on your part though.
  8. You don't have to show your receipt. Just say "sorry, I don't have time" and continue walking (polite way to do it), or just walk out ignoring the receipt checker. Actually, at the warehouse clubs, you don't get that option if you want to be a member any longer. Their club, their rules... My stuff, my life.
  9. Plus, they all treat customers as criminals as they place a bouncer at the door to stop people and demand receipts.
  10. You've forgotten about Sam's club completely refusing VISA cards because of refusal to negotiate their processing fees, eh? DumpMart may be a "tiny percentage" of Visa/MC's business, but they are a significant enough percentage to be able to negotiate their processing changes...the only merchant to successfully do so. They haven't been able to negotiate their own deal over rules against photo ID. Walmart is actually lobbying for chip and pin.
  11. Even as huge as Walmart is, they are but a tiny percentage of MC/Visa's business. Conversely, there are only a handful of ways to pay for stuff at Walmart. Take away MC/Visa and people will walk. MC and Visa were thriving long before Walmart existed.
  12. you mean the contract that the customer did not enter into? The breach, if one wants to find one exists, is between the merchant and either V/MC. It doesn't matter who entered into it. A contract is a contract. A lie is a lie and lying is what you seem to support. only the parties to the contract have true standing to grieve the breach. There is no 'lying' that has occurred in this situation. But you go ahead and keep worrying yourself to death about things in life that don't amount to anything at the end of the day...in the meantime, I will continue making the purchases that I went to a store to make. The lying would be when a business signs a contract it does not honor. And MC/Visa encourage us to report them. When we do, I have found that the rules are usually enforced.
  13. you mean the contract that the customer did not enter into? The breach, if one wants to find one exists, is between the merchant and either V/MC. It doesn't matter who entered into it. A contract is a contract. A lie is a lie and lying is what you seem to support.
  14. Requiring ID for a credit card purchase is a breach of contract.
  15. Just a simple "No" takes MUCH less time than getting your wallet, pulling out the ID, handing to the clerk, waiting for them to look at it, (as if that $9/hr cashier would have the faintest clue what a fake ID would look like or what they would actually do if they thought it was), them handing it back, putting it back in your wallet. That is, if we're actually talking about useless wastes of time, You mean that wallet that is ALREADY out because that is where you keep the credit card in question? Yeah, yet another red herring shot to hell...file that one right along the ones screaming that checking ID on a purchase is equatable to a police state... And as to OP...yes I read the part that your spouse completed their purchase but you also indicated that you had items you were looking for that were on clearance...which means you ultimately wasted time and effort going to another store and quite possibly paying more for your items than you would have in this instance. Makes sense to me...ranks right up there with the current administrations philosphy of spending our way out of an economic downturn (in other words, it ain't something that makes sense). MAYBE, just MAYBE that gets it close enough to P to lock this one down... I'm thinking that "red herring" isn't exactly the right term for this. Given that MOST people do not carry their license in a DIFFERENT wallet than they keep the credit cards, red herring would be WHOLLY appropriate as the term. One does not need a an excuse. Requiring ID is prohibited by the merchant contract

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