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lgt525

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  1. @hdporter I agree with everything you said. 🙂 There were a lot of inaccuracies with what AFNI was reporting on behalf of Comcast. I could have disputed all of them. Wrong balance, wrong dates, etc. I didn't even dispute with the credit bureaus. I just did the bbb complaint and AFNI removed the collection after that. I paid the original creditor Comcast to get a zero balance. (and then I worked with a different department in comcast to get reimbursed for the cablebox I had just paid for but that is another story lol ) Once I had proof of payment with the original creditor, there was no reason for AFNI to spend time and money fighting me. I filed a complaint with the bbb since for some neurotic reason the collector is sensitive to bbb complaints. I found this out on this board. 🙂 It all could have gone wrong I agree. I might have ended up with a collection that showed as paid. There were plenty of inaccuracies in the AFNI collection I could have disputed many times. One of them probably would have worked but it would have taken time. The key for me was paying the original creditor and NOT the collection agency. That gave me more options (in my opinion) for disputing inaccuracies, escalating etc, none of which would have been guaranteed to work, I agree. Also, I never received a notice from AFNI before the collection ended up on my report which gave me plenty of room to contact the Illinois AG, bbb, attorneys, etc. It was a risk I was willing to take because of the 76 point hit to my ficos. YMMV of course. 🙂
  2. @StarkRaven$ I paid the original creditor comast. I agree you should never pay the collection agency if possible. Pay for delete should be a last resort since many collection agencies don't honor their deals. But paying the original creditor makes the debt invalid for the collection agency to report on. The zero balance is with the original creditor, so there is no collection, no changing balances on the collection info etc. They need to withdraw the reporting. AFNI is particularly willing to do this if pressed via BBB. I think it's worth a try for other utility collectors as well like the one the OP is dealing with. The key here is that the debt still needs to be owned by the original creditor. If a JDB has bought it, this won't work.
  3. @maverick9 I had a similar situation happen with an old comcast account that put on my credit reports last year by AFNI. I had never received a credit for my returned cable box and router from comcast when I moved and dropped them off at the UPS store. They sent the account to collections and I had no idea I owed anything. The collection dropped my score 76 points. It was reaged to appear like a recent account. I checked with the original creditor comcast FIRST. I logged in to my two year old dormant account and sure enough the balance was showing there for the cable box. I paid it on the portal and printed a copy of my zero balance as a pdf. I then went to the Illinois better business bureau and filed a complaint against AFNI stating that they were reaging a reporting a balance on an account that I owed nothing to the original creditor. AFNI is known to cave when you file bbb complaints. I attached the zero balance pdf from the comcast website as proof. AFNI responded to the bbb complaint within 24 hours and said they would remove the collection from all three reports. They did. I think a LOT of collectors that collect for utilities work the same way. My suggestion would be to see if you can pay the balance owed with ATT and do not deal with the creditor until you have a zero balance. Then demand they stop collecting on the account and remove the incorrect collection from your reports because the collection WILL be incorrect. They have no reason or ability to collect on an account that has been paid in full with the original creditor.
  4. Apparently there is a third camp of Wayfair card users: those that automatically received some sort of generic Comenity mastercard after the Wayfair card closed. Strange situation over at Wayfair.
  5. @hegemony I just noticed the 9/11 picture in your signature. I was in Tower 2 that day. I'm very grateful and happy to be here tweaking my credit with all the fine people on Creditboards
  6. @hegemony apparently there are two camps: those that got a replacement mastercard from Comenity that is not affiliated with Wayfair, and those that didn't. I closed my Wayfair account the minute they sent me a message stating they were closing the card, so I am in neither camp. The new mastercard is with Citibank. Since most of the people on that other forum liked the Wayfair card for its huge credit limits and credit limit increases and its lax underwriting, my guess is they are going to be disappointed with the citi card I don't intend to apply. I only kept the wayfair card open because I had 0% financing on a refrigerator on it, and because its one of my first post bankruptcy cards and I kept it for age. You guys talked me out of keeping it open lol.
  7. I closed my account with Wayfair when I got their notice, so I won't be getting one of the Mastercards. It's not clear everyone is getting them. My guess is that Comenity tried to sell their Wayfair portfolio to another bank and something went wrong, and now they are turning some of the cards into Mastercards. I have no desire for a Comenity Mastercard, so no loss for me either way.
  8. @123890 It sounds like you already purchased the fraudulent trade line. It is most likely not going to raise your scores much. With recent lates on four new credit cards within the last six months and an eviction judgement, you are not going to get a new credit card, especially one that offers a $2-3k cash advance. I would concentrate on cleaning up your credit reports. Your recent issues will keep you from getting an unsecured credit card on your own right now.
  9. Having filed bankruptcy during the last financial crisis (2009), I saw first hand what the trustees were like. And the creditors. NO big banks questioned my spending habits. I would think this would be especially true for a 67 year old that has worked in public service running arts programs for children and lost her job due to COVID closures. The pattern of trying in earnest to pay off the debt will also be clear to any trustee looking at the case. That being said, I still don't think getting another credit card is going to help the OP. Shaving off a few points of interest will keep the balance from growing, but will not lower the amount owed, and with no income it is not clear how else to lower the amount owed. I commend @BethM for seeking help and answers and for working towards a solution. There are several solutions, just none that will happen instantly. Many of us on this board have faced similar circumstances. I hope that what I experienced 11 years ago can somehow help clarify any questions that @BethM might have. (even in a small way)
  10. You are not going to prison @BethM You do have an amount of debt that is unmanageable for someone who is unemployed however. This is most likely where the bankruptcy discussions are coming in. Bankruptcy is one option for you, but you cannot use your credit cards for "luxury goods" for more than $725 per creditor 90 days before you file for bankruptcy. You cannot get a cash advance from a card totaling $1000 from a single creditor for 70 days before filing. Those actions are considered fraud. Of course all of that is open to legal interpretation and most of the things you would put on your card such as utilities, food, household goods are NOT considered "luxury" goods anyway. But why put yourself in that grey area? That is why applying for a balance transfer card would be advised against, if you are going to file for bankruptcy soon. Other posters are talking about the information you would put on the credit card application to get approved. If you are unemployed, most cards are unlikely to approve you unless you lie about your income and employment which is also a fraud. I don't think you were suggesting you would lie. I just think you were exploring your options for managing your card payments. But the physics just aren't there. With no income and $60k of debt, you really do not have a lot of options other than Bankruptcy, forbearance or a structured payment plan of some sort. The other reason people are advising you not to get another credit card, is that with that amount of debt and no income, you are just masking your problem. There is no way to pay off that debt with no money coming in. Balance transfers are not going to solve your debt problem. Bankruptcy will be the only option that stops the interest building on your account and completely forgives all the debt. But if you file for bankruptcy, your trustee and creditors will look at your card activity for the months leading up to you filing for signs of "intent to fraud". See above for what they mean by that. Good luck on making a tough decision.
  11. @BethM as someone who filed bankruptcy 11 years ago, I look at your post and am worried about the level of debt you have relative to your income. (no income, high debt) Getting more credit is NOT going to solve your debt problem. As Hegemony says, moving your debt around is not going to get rid of it either. With that much debt and no income, anything you do except pay the debt off will be a cosmetic cover up and at best and not a real solution. I was seriously ill two years ago (ironically with a lung issue similar to COVID). My debt piled up quickly even with good insurance. I ended up owing over 50k after my insurance paid their part. This was in addition to about 18k of credit card debt. I paid it all off by concentrating on paying off the smallest balances first and getting them out of the way and then using all of my discretionary income to pay off the rest. I now owe about 7k total on 75k worth of credit cards. All medical debt has been paid off for over a year. (I took a 401k loan and paid the loan back early with my yearly bonuses. Not sure this board approves of that or not lol) I was employed with a decent salary so it's not a fair comparison I get it. But the key here is that 60k of debt is not going to go away. If you are unemployed, there is almost no way you can fix that problem without cutting your budget and paying down the balances. Sooner or later the credit bureaus will "guess" that your income situation may have changed and might follow up to find out income verification, especially if you start spending more on the cards or your patterns change on the cards. Pay as much as you can on them.
  12. I think the impacted OP should call multiple times a day every day until the cost of explaining and supporting that $100 cut in credit line exceeds $10k for comenity. Just saying....
  13. @RehabbingANDBlabbing thanks for the tip on the $1 free ficos! I just pulled them. @shifter your assessment was right on target. My fico8 is 745 on experian, 742 on Transunion, and 748 on Equifax as of five minutes ago. I am still going to go with my plan to make sure no small balances post at statement time and to pay wayfair and apple down quickly to under 30%, with everything fully paid off by December. Thanks!!!
  14. @shifterI look at the free scores that come with my credit cards. Chase, Capital One, Discover, Synchrony Visa all offer free scores. I haven't paid for a FICO score but I could if you think it would be different. That is exactly my profile as of today lol so I am assuming I am not pulling the right FICO I'll check FICO site out later and repost.
  15. lgt525

    Capital One

    I am going to just pay them in full each month. I did that hoping to get CLI, but I agree it's not working lol

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