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fiveyearbet

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  1. My goodness, Mary, thats a lot to spend EVERY TWO WEEKS! on nails. I have two clippers (one for my fingernails, the bigger one for my toenails) and I just cut the nails myself. Well, I am a guy but I didn't know that women spend that much to do nails. I must admit, some of those nails (ladies), look extra beautiful after they are done, but $80 EVERY TWO WEEKS ?????
  2. I think this observation is right on. Like you, I think the price of laundry equipment will get lower and lower, and access to them will become easier and easier, so I just cant see that people will pay more to do laundry, instead they should be paying less. Also who knows what technology might do to this industry. Perhaps the business will go the way of the Video rental stores. Not saying laundromats will vanish tommorow but your observations are cause for caution especially if one is thinking long term.
  3. lm26, can you direct me to a website, company, source etc where I can get more info on this business? Are you still planning on getting into it? Or are you in it already? Also I know ATM fees are approximately $1.50 to $2.00 per use, so one would need a lot of machines placed in a lot of locations to make significant money out of it. So the question of location will be very important. How, where do you get these locations. I have seen a couple in restaurants etc. Do you pay some kindda fee to the owner of the establishment? And the companies that remove and put back money in the machines, do you have any contacts? The more I think about this, the more it reminds me of vending machines. The thing with vending nachines is LOCATION, and in many cities, the better locations have been taken already....I know I have asked many questions, just answer whatever you can...thanks...
  4. direct, what kind of "information"? You have an example of such a site?, and if you and I mean the same "entertainment" I am thinking of, aren't there too many of those websites already?
  5. mary123, lm26, cubu, gregj,kia, and direct thanks for all the good ideas. Gives me much to think about.
  6. Hello all, I am considering purchasing a business, but I am not decided yet on what type of business to purchase. My main problem is that I am looking for a business that can be run as an ABSENTEE-OWNER BUSINESS, that is a business that will require very little involvement on my part to operate. Essentially a business that will be able to run on its own. I am looking for this type of business because I have very little time to spare from my day-to-day occupation. Needless to say that very few businesses can be run strictly on an absentee-owner basis. So I am having trouble coming up with suitable candidates. For now it looks to me that one can own and manage a small chain of laundromats as an absentee-owner business. This is just an assumption on my part because I know next to nothing about the laundromat business. So I have two questions: 1. For those that own a laundromat, or a chain of laudromats, what has been your experience in the laundromat business? Can it be really be run on an absentee basis? What are the pros and cons of this type of business? Is there any future/growth potential here? If you could start over, would you even have gone into the laundromat business? Any other info you deem important? By the way I am in NYC and there is quite a few of them for sale around here. (hmmmmmm...I wonder why... ) 2. Also I need more ideas on other types of businesses that can be owned and run on an absentee-owner basis. Your suggestions are welcome. Thanks.
  7. You can buy the golf sock. http://valerospecialtyshop.com/shopping_li...OC&MKT=M&SEQ=02 That's easier to hide.
  8. Sorry people, I mistakenly switched the states around. Here is the corrected list: NORTH CAROLINA City........ # of Stores BAKERSVILLE 1 BLOWING ROCK 1 CROSSNORE 1 LINCOLNTON 1 ROXBORO 1 SPRUCE PINE 2 SYLVA 3 WEAVERVILLE 1 NEW YORK City #........ of Stores AMITYVILLE 2 BALDWIN 3 BALDWINSVILLE 1 BELLMORE 2 BINGHAMTON 9 BRIDGEWATER 1 BROOKLYN 2 BUFFALO 3 CANANDAIGUA 1 CARTHAGE 1 COPIAGUE 1 EAST MORICHES 1 EASTPORT 1 ENDICOTT 3 FARMINGDALE 3 FISHKILL 1 FLORIDA 1 FORT PLAIN 1 FULTON 1 GLEN AUBREY 1 HAMILTON 1 HANCOCK 1 HARPURSVILLE 1 HARRIMAN 1 HASTING-ON-HUDSON 1 HEMPSTEAD 2 HUNTER 1 HUNTINGTON 1 ISLIP 1 ITHACA 2 JACKSONVILLE 1 JAMAICA 1 JAMESPORT 1 JOHNSON CITY 3 KERHONKSON 1 KINGS PARK 1 LIVERPOOL 1 MASTIC 1 MIDDLE VILLAGE 1 MIDDLETOWN 1 MONTICELLO 1 MORRISVILLE 1 MOUNT SINAI 1 MOUNT UPTON 1 NEW HYDE PARK 2 NEW ROCHELLE 1 NEW WINDSOR 1 NIAGARA FALLS 1 NICHOLS 1 NORFOLK 1 NORTH MERRICK 1 NORWICH 3 OAKDALE 1 OCEANSIDE 1 OSWEGO 1 OXFORD 1 PHOENICIA 1 PHOENIX 1 PINE ISLAND 1 POTSDAM 1 ROCHESTER 1 SELDEN 1 SODUS 1 SOUTHFIELDS 1 STATEN ISLAND 2 SYRACUSE 3 VESTAL 2 WADING RIVER 1 WANTAGH 1 WATKINS GLEN 1 WEST ISLIP 1 WEST SAYVILLE 1 WESTHAMPTON BEACH 1 WINDHAM 1 WYANDANCH 1
  9. You can also use the card to purchase stuff from their online store. Check here: http://valerospecialtyshop.com/main.asp. They accept the Valero card for payment. This is a direct quote from their site: "We accept American Express, VISA, MasterCard, Discover, TOTAL, VALERO, Beacon or Diamond Shamrock credit cards." You can read more here: http://valerospecialtyshop.com/information.asp
  10. Valero has many locations in New York and North Carolina. But not sure about DC. Check here: http://www.valero.com/Retail+Marketing/StoreLocator/ NEW YORK City........ # of Stores BAKERSVILLE 1 BLOWING ROCK 1 CROSSNORE 1 LINCOLNTON 1 ROXBORO 1 SPRUCE PINE 2 SYLVA 3 WEAVERVILLE 1 NORTH CAROLINA City #........ of Stores AMITYVILLE 2 BALDWIN 3 BALDWINSVILLE 1 BELLMORE 2 BINGHAMTON 9 BRIDGEWATER 1 BROOKLYN 2 BUFFALO 3 CANANDAIGUA 1 CARTHAGE 1 COPIAGUE 1 EAST MORICHES 1 EASTPORT 1 ENDICOTT 3 FARMINGDALE 3 FISHKILL 1 FLORIDA 1 FORT PLAIN 1 FULTON 1 GLEN AUBREY 1 HAMILTON 1 HANCOCK 1 HARPURSVILLE 1 HARRIMAN 1 HASTING-ON-HUDSON 1 HEMPSTEAD 2 HUNTER 1 HUNTINGTON 1 ISLIP 1 ITHACA 2 JACKSONVILLE 1 JAMAICA 1 JAMESPORT 1 JOHNSON CITY 3 KERHONKSON 1 KINGS PARK 1 LIVERPOOL 1 MASTIC 1 MIDDLE VILLAGE 1 MIDDLETOWN 1 MONTICELLO 1 MORRISVILLE 1 MOUNT SINAI 1 MOUNT UPTON 1 NEW HYDE PARK 2 NEW ROCHELLE 1 NEW WINDSOR 1 NIAGARA FALLS 1 NICHOLS 1 NORFOLK 1 NORTH MERRICK 1 NORWICH 3 OAKDALE 1 OCEANSIDE 1 OSWEGO 1 OXFORD 1 PHOENICIA 1 PHOENIX 1 PINE ISLAND 1 POTSDAM 1 ROCHESTER 1 SELDEN 1 SODUS 1 SOUTHFIELDS 1 STATEN ISLAND 2 SYRACUSE 3 VESTAL 2 WADING RIVER 1 WANTAGH 1 WATKINS GLEN 1 WEST ISLIP 1 WEST SAYVILLE 1 WESTHAMPTON BEACH 1 WINDHAM 1 WYANDANCH 1
  11. Hello Magumpus, Did you say this to the salesman, or are you planning to say this to him? Is this some kindda letter you are composing to send to him?
  12. I dont know if you should have posted this story. Sometimes its best to let sleeping dogs lie...
  13. Akai, Remember I said that a roommate is someone who lives with you (permanently on your invitation). And that a roommate does not pay rent, and does not sign a lease. And that although a roommate may share some expenses with the primary tenant, the roommate has no obligation to pay any rent to any landlord because a roommate has no landlord, and that a roommate has no lease. All that a roommate enjoys is an invitation to reside in the premises, and a “license” to enter and use the premises indefinitely. The primary tenant who granted the roommate that invitation/license, can revoke it at any time. All he has to do is inform the roommate to leave. But if the roommate does not leave, the primary tenant must seek an order from a court ejecting the roommate. The ground for obtaining that order would be that the primary tenant has revoked whatever invitation/ license he had granted the roommate to remain or reside on the premises. The court will require that the roommate be giving reasonable notice, and reasonable time to make arrangements to leave. Ultimately if the roommate disregards the court’s order and does not leave, he could be found to be in contempt of the court’s order, and placed under arrest. So that’s how you get rid of a roommate. You inform them (better in writing) that you are revoking their license/invitation and that you want them out of your apartment. You should give them adequate and reasonable notice (e.g 30 days). If they fail to move, then you sue them. In some states they may call this proceeding different names (ejectment, eviction, removal, evacuation etc). But they are all really the same. Bottom line is you are asking the court to issue an order removing a person (roommate) from a apartment so that the person rightfully entitled to possess it (primary tenant) is restored to full control over the apartment. But there are other types of relationships that are sometimes also loosely refered to as “roommate”. An example is someone who is TEMPORARILY staying with a primary tenant, under the primary tenant’s invitation. Such a person is rightfully refered to as a GUEST. The key word here is “TEMPORARY”. Usually this means a license of approximatley 30 days or less. For example if your friend flies in from florida to visit you for a week. He is a GUEST (a “roommate” with a temporary invitation/license). So how do you get rid of a “guest”? You call the cops. So long as you can prove to the police that you are the primary tenant who has a right to the apartment. They will ask your guest (soon to be ex-friend) how long he has resided in the apartment. Usually if he has resided in the apartment less than 30 days, the cops will order him to leave the premises immediately or be arrested. If the cops are kind they may order him to leave, but refer him to a shelter or hotel or whereever he can pass the night, and then go on his way from there. But if they ask him how long he has resided in that apartment, and he says something like “4 months”, the cops would almost always advise you that this is now a civil matter, and that you have to sue him to get him out. Why? Because he has become a roommate with a permanent invitatation. The evidence of that permanence is the fact that he has been there for so long (4 months). Yet another type of relationship that may be somewhat related to these scenarios, and which again is loosely referred to as “roommate” is a “rommate” who is in act a SUB-TENANT. sub-tenant is someone who rents the apartment from the primary tenant (that is, subleasing from the primary tenant). A sub-tenant signs a sub-lease with the primary tenant, after the primary tenant had signed the main lease with the landlord. Usually the main lease has to permit subleasing before the primary tenant can sublease to a subtenant. In a sense it would seem as if in the sub-lease situation, the primary tenent has become the landlord, and the subtenant has become the tenant. A sub-tenant has the right to live in the apartment for the entire term of the sublease that he signed. So if a sub-tensnt is poaying his rent and otherwise coplying with the lease, you cannot eveict him until the expiration of his sub-lease. A sub-tenant is responsible to the primary tenant for rent (just as the primary tenant is responsible to the landlord for rent). So how can a primary tenant get rid of a subtenant? It depends on why you want to get rid of the sub-tenent. But almost all the rights that apply to a primary tenant equally apply to a subtenant. In other words you would be required to give the subtenant notice, serve them with papers, go through an eviction proceeding, get a court order, go through the marshals/sheriff etc before you can get the sub-tenant out. Usually you can evict a sub-tenant if they stop paying rent, or if they holdover after their sub-lease has expired. So although people usually refer to a co-tenant, a sub-tenant, a guest (sometimes), and a true roommate, all loosely as “roommate”, as you can see they are not all the same legally. When someone says “I want to get rid of my roommate” or “I am having problems with my roommate”. You might want to inquire further as to what they mean by “roommate”.
  14. Hello Doug, I have written a long response in answer to the questions and the issues you raised in this thread because you have helped a lot of people here and you have always been forthcoming with information. That is something to be admired and appreciated and so I don’t mind taking a few minutes (or two) to offer my own opinion and suggestions in this matter. OK. First you have to get the legal relationships straight. This person is not your roommate, he is a co-tenant . A roommate is someone who lives with you (permanently on your invitation). A roommate does not pay rent, and does not sign a lease. A roommate may share some expenses with you, but has no obligation to pay any rent to any landlord because a roommate has no landlord. You the primary tenant are 100% responsible for the apartment including paying all of the rent on time to the landlord . On the other hand, a co-tenant is someone who rents the apartment with you under the same lease. A co-tenant signs the lease, and is responsible to pay the rent. Usually leases are written in such a way that each, or both co-tenants are responsible for 100% of the rent. This means that the landlord can come after either one or both of you for the rent. So this guy is your co-tenant not your roommate. Since he is a co-tenant, this means that he is a beneficiary of the original lease. Under that lease he is required to pay rent, but the landlord can come after you or him for the rent. In this case we can assume that the landlord came after you (the monied guy) instead of him (the broke guy) because you paid the rent afterall. You, however, should be able to sue this guy to recover the portion of the rent you paid in his behalf. Depending on the amount you have paid so far, it may be a small claims court matter. So you can go to small claims court and sue him for the amount you have had to expend because of his refusal/failure to pay his own share of the rent. And remember the landlord does not care what arangement you have with your co-tenant, because as far as the landlord is concerned both of you are independently and jointly responsible for 100% of the rent anyway. You cannot evict this guy because only a landlord can evict a tenant. You are not his landlord so you cannot evict him . Unfortunately as I said both of you are independently and jointly responsible for 100% of the rent so if he stops paying from now till the end of the lease, you are still responsible for the rent until the original lease expires. Although you will always be able to sue him and obtain a judgment for any monies you paid to the landlord in his behalf. As a practical matter you can have a lawyer write him a letter now demanding payment. Maybe that might encourage him to pay you (this is assuming he even has the money). The landlord cannot merely “take him off the lease” or as you stated just tear the first lease up . The landlord has no right to do that because the landlord is receiving his rent every month (although we know only poor Doug is the one paying the rent) . But the point is that the landlord is receiving his rent nonetheless, so he cannot even start an eviction proceeding against you and your co-tenant (at least not for non-payment of rent), because you guys pay your rent. The landlord receives his rent every month, does he not? Also the second lease you signed with the landlord may be invalid if the first lease has not expired yet . If the first lease is still current, then the landlord is obligated to make that aprtment available to the co-tenants (you and the guy). He cannot rent out an apartment which is currently under lease This is what he is doing when he signs a new lease with you, thereby disregarding the first lease. I know this may sound outrageous, but the lanlord may be in breach of contract (the first lease) if he denies your co-tenant access to the apartment. Again assuming the only issue here is non-payment of rent, the lanlord has no right to deny your co-tenant use of the apartment because he is obligated to you and your co-tenant under the first/original lease (this is assuming the first lease has not expired). In addition the landlord has been getting his rent (from Doug) but he has been getting his rent nonetheless so what’s his problem? Again landlord cannot convey away an apartment that is already under lease (the first lease). If he attemots to do that, the second lease may be found to be invalid, and if the landlord interferes with the guys right to access to the aprtment, the landlord may have thereby violated that first lease. So the second lease may be invalid. As you correctly stated, you cannot put this guy’s stuff out in the street. If you did that you would be unlawfully ejecting him from a property that he (for now) still has rights to. If you did that, you would be unlawfully interfering with his rights to a property that he still has rights to.Only a court can issue an order to eject or evict him depending on the type of case brought against him. If you put his stuff out in the street it could get complicated real fast and he could call the police (and in extreme cases) you (the offender) could get arrested . In that same vein, do not change the locks on him, That is the same as putting his stuff out in the street. By taking either of those actions (or in other caes turning off electricity, water, heat etc) you would be unlawfully ejecting him from a property that he (for now) still has rights to. Again only a court can issue an order, and only a marshal or a sheriff or a cop can carry out such order of ejectment/eviction, NOT YOU. Do not go and obtain a restraining order against him as a “backdoor” tactic to getting him out of the apartment. He could sue you for abuse of process. If you truly have fear of physical harm from him then you may consider obtaining the restraining order, but if you go and obtain a restraining order merely as a pretext to remove him from this property (that he still has rights to), as I said, he could sue you for abuse of process. And to the extent that he can prove that the “facts” you represented to the police to get the restraining order were false and were a pretext, he could win the lawsuit against you.. So what should you do? You have two problems. You want him out of the apartment, and you want the monies that you have already paid in his behalf. To get him out of the aprtment you could do it two ways. The first way will involve the landlord evicting both of you, after which you can then sign a new lease with the landlord. The disadvantage with this option is that in order for the landlord to begin eviction proceedings against you and the guy, the landlord would have to file court papers against you and your co-tenant, and those papers are public records, and could eventually cause your name to be entered into deadbeat tenant databases, or even find its way into your credit report. But assuming you “stopped paying rent completely” (wink wink). This will cause the landlord to begin eviction proceedings against “both of you” (wink wink). Somewhere during the eviction proceedings both of you would enter into a stipulation with landlord requiring both of you to get out by a certain date. After that date, and after the broke guy moves out, you can then re-sign a new lease with lanlord and stay in the apartment, this time as the only tenant. The second way you could try to get him out, is that you (not landlord) could bring an ejectment action (not eviction action) against him. In other words you would sue the guy for breaching the agreement you had with him that he would pay his part of the rent (this is not the first lease, this would be a different side agreement). Hopefully you have a written side agreement with him establishing who is respinsible for what in the apartment. If you do, you can sue him for breach of that agreement, and for return of the monies you have paid in his behalf, and then you may ask the court to declare your rights under the original lease. The court can look at the whole situation and determine that under the circumstances the guy should no longer have any rights under the lease as he has violated the agreement you had with him that he is to pay part of the rent, and in essence is living in the apartment for free, thus working an injustice on you. This would be an unfair set of circumstances. Unfair to you. A court has the power to correct the injustice by ordering him ejected from the property on those grounds. The same court can award you money damages for the amount he owes you. As far as getting your money from him. Regardless of what happens, he is laible to you for whatever monies you paid out in his behalf. A copy of the original lease should show that he had obligation to pay rent. And a copy of the your rent receipts (hope you are keeping them) will show that you (not him) paid the rent. With those documents you could sue him and get a judgment against him. That is if he does not eventually pay you your money. Or you could get Pauley Walnuts from the Sopranos to pay him a visit. How about that? Just kidding. Goodluck on this. It is never a good idea to have a co-tenant without a cotenancy agreement. It is the same thing as having a business partner without a partnership agreement. When disagreements emerge (as they certainly will) they become difficult to sort out without a prior written agreement. It also is not a good idea for a landlord to rent to co-tenants unless the lease is very tightly written. Even with a tightly written lease, I will rent to co-tenants only as a last resort. Finally of course you know that I am not giving you legal advice here. You are a smart guy and you should not act or rely on what I said here . You should go see an attorney to help you, as you have already said that you will. Again goodluck. NB:Even if he does not have a copy of the first lease, if there was ever a court action on this matter, and if either you or the andlord were aksed under oath if broke guy ever signed a written lease with landlord, and if either of you said "NO", that would be a lie, and if eventually demonstrated to be a lie, at the very least you will be held in contempt of court and sanctioned. Or maybe charged with perjury (not sure about that one, but remotely possible).
  15. Does anyone know of any board/forum (similar to Credit Boards) where the focus is on short-term trading in the stock market, or trading in particular stocks? Any info/links appreciated. Thanks. * Dont know if this is appropriate to ask here, but if it is not, I apologize to the moderators. * ONE.

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