Jump to content




Welcome to CreditBoards!


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to CreditBoards! Like most online communities, you must register to post in our community, but don't worry - this is a simple process requiring minimal information for you to sign up. Be a part of CreditBoards by signing in or creating an account.
  • Start new topics and reply to others
  • Subscribe to topics to get email updates
  • Get your own profile page and make new friends
  • Send personal messages to other members.
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Read These Items!

  • If you're getting an Authentication mismatch error: Clear your cache. Log out of CB. Delete your cookie. Close your browser. Open your browser and log back in.

Photo

Debtor's Prison For Medical Debt


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Why Chat

Why Chat
  • Members
  • 21,695 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:07 PM

http://finance.yahoo...s--prisons.html

How did breast cancer survivor Lisa Lindsay end up behind bars? She didn't pay a medical bill -- one the Herrin, Ill., teaching assistant was told she didn't owe. "She got a $280 medical bill in error and was told she didn't have to pay it," The Associated Press reports. "But the bill was turned over to a collection agency, and eventually state troopers showed up at her home and took her to jail in handcuffs."



#2 disnugaswagg

disnugaswagg
  • Members
  • 853 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:33 PM

Wow, are you serious? I do not understand how this could happen if it was abolished by Federal decree in the 1830s. So, I did a quick Google and came up with even more occurances of debtors being jailed. WhyChat I that this is your field of mastery... so what can/could be done if one found themselves faced with these types problems?

#3 haru

haru
  • Members
  • 270 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:53 PM

What exactly is the thought process? Someone doesn't have the money to pay something so throwing them in jail will change that? If you have two insurances and their billed in the wrong order ( Secondary insurance then primary ) the insurance companies won't cover it and the bill becomes yours... then you go to jail for the mistake of the billing department?

#4 disnugaswagg

disnugaswagg
  • Members
  • 853 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:11 PM

Yes, I agree haru. I guess that throwing a debtor behind bars would get the debt paid. Ridiculous! From reading over several articles, I have found that these types of practices have really picked-up in 2010. Are these the new strategies that collections agencies are using to get bad debt paid? Most importantly, if they call threatening to have you incarcerated is this now an acceptable form of pursing bad debt? Also how does FDCRA and SOL play in these scenarios? Is it still safe to say that if the debt is past SOL that you are free and clear? Wow, This is a topic that needs immediate attention. Hopefully some of the seasoned CBers will give some advice soon.

#5 breeze

breeze

    Site Owners & FC XXXVIII <3

  • Admin
  • 47,272 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:42 PM

Technically, it's for failing to appear when ordered by the court. It's being abused by debt collectors and others to try to extract money from people who don't understand what's happening.

#6 haru

haru
  • Members
  • 270 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:58 PM

You would think a default judgement would be enough for FTA. Seems a bit archaic.

#7 disnugaswagg

disnugaswagg
  • Members
  • 853 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 07:11 PM

Oh, so this is how they have found a loop-hole. Wow! Okay, so if the CA goes to a judge and get an order to appear in court would it be in the debtor's jurisdiction or could it be far away? Also, who would responsible for notifying the debtor that they must appear in court?

My reasoning for asking is because a relative were ordered to appear in court, but it was not the responsibility of the court to notify, it was the creditor's responsibility. Thus, she was never notified of the court date and an Order of Judgment was placed against her. Now suppose this was a summons to appear in court, she would have a warrant for her arrest for a no-show and would have been locked up. Wow.

Edited by disnugaswagg, 28 April 2012 - 07:12 PM.


#8 Why Chat

Why Chat
  • Members
  • 21,695 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:31 PM

Every time you pay a CA for a medical debt you are contributing to the continuing abuse by this slimebag business.

Dispute, validate, respond to all legal actions, fight every CA in every and any way you can.

They are all alike, there is no such thing as a "good honest" CA. Their business depends on threats and scares and you need to stop supporting this vile industry.

#9 breeze

breeze

    Site Owners & FC XXXVIII <3

  • Admin
  • 47,272 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 02:13 PM

You would think a default judgement would be enough for FTA. Seems a bit archaic.



No, in that situation, you just lose by default, and the CA gets a default judgment. After they get the judgment, they have to figure out a way to get the money from you. They file for a type of "discovery" or "interrogatories" where you are supposed to show up at the courthouse; they meet with you in a private room, not the courtroom itself, and they ask you - under oath - about your bank accounts, employment, income, other assets. You have to tell the truth, because it is, technically, court, and you are facing perjury if you lie and get caught.

Most people do not understand how this works, and if they are scared, they don't show up. Many courts do not allow arrests in these cases, but some courts do. Some of the judges in those courts are former creditor's lawyers, or they are long golfing/drinking buddies with the lawyers, and are not impartial. Many of the are cases of "sewer service" - the person never knew they had been sued or ordered to appear for the debtor's exam. Illinois is a bad one - they cater to the collectors, especially the ones who have based their businesses there.

The thing, as WC says, is to head them off at the pass, and don't let it get that far. In the event it does for some reason, do not ever ignore court documents or orders.

If someone gets arrested like this and they were never served, that's whole other thing. Their civil rights were violated.

#10 haru

haru
  • Members
  • 270 posts

Posted 29 April 2012 - 05:53 PM


You would think a default judgement would be enough for FTA. Seems a bit archaic.



No, in that situation, you just lose by default, and the CA gets a default judgment. After they get the judgment, they have to figure out a way to get the money from you. They file for a type of "discovery" or "interrogatories" where you are supposed to show up at the courthouse; they meet with you in a private room, not the courtroom itself, and they ask you - under oath - about your bank accounts, employment, income, other assets. You have to tell the truth, because it is, technically, court, and you are facing perjury if you lie and get caught.

Most people do not understand how this works, and if they are scared, they don't show up. Many courts do not allow arrests in these cases, but some courts do. Some of the judges in those courts are former creditor's lawyers, or they are long golfing/drinking buddies with the lawyers, and are not impartial. Many of the are cases of "sewer service" - the person never knew they had been sued or ordered to appear for the debtor's exam. Illinois is a bad one - they cater to the collectors, especially the ones who have based their businesses there.

The thing, as WC says, is to head them off at the pass, and don't let it get that far. In the event it does for some reason, do not ever ignore court documents or orders.

If someone gets arrested like this and they were never served, that's whole other thing. Their civil rights were violated.


Yes, I agree completely. It's best for consumers to fight to the bitter end, taking advantage of all the rights afforded to them. Burying one's head in the sand won't solve anything, I would never FTA. My main concern would be people being thrown in jail when they were never notified of the proceedings, this seems ripe for abuse.




0 user(s) are browsing this forum

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users



© Copyright 2003 - 2013 Creditboards.com. All rights reserved. No portion of this site may be reproduced without explicit permission from the owners. The content of creditboards.com is subject solely to the personal whim of its admins. We reserve the right, at our sole discretion, to remove any and all posts or comments, at any time, for any reason which takes our entirely capricious fancy, or for no particular reason whatsoever, without restriction. Comments or questions regarding the site may be addressed to admin@creditboards.com.