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$25 credit card minimum - Is this allowed?


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115 replies to this topic

#101 athensgaguy

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 07:45 AM

And you are not responsible for fraud with Visa/MC/AmEx.

Zero liability makes for a great ad campaign, but the reality is that it does not stop your credit from being jacked up when you get hit by fraud...been there, done that. Close to $200K worth of been there, done that. Zero liability DID NOTHING to fix the problem.

And an unattended location would be the IDEAL place for people to put skimmers into place...

Now, this I agree with you on this centex.

Curiously, the policy-bots never have an answer for when it doesn't work as advertised.


To take advantage of the law's consumer protections, you must:

  • write to the creditor at the address given for "billing inquiries," not the address for sending your payments, and include your name, address, account number and a description of the billing error.
  • send your letter so that it reaches the creditor within 60 days after the first bill containing the error was mailed to you.

Send your letter by certified mail, return receipt requested, so you have proof of what the creditor received. Include copies (not originals) of sales slips or other documents that support your position. Keep a copy of your dispute letter.

The creditor must acknowledge your complaint in writing within 30 days after receiving it, unless the problem has been resolved. The creditor must resolve the dispute within two billing cycles (but not more than 90 days) after receiving your letter.


If the creditor's investigation determines the bill is correct, you must be told promptly and in writing how much you owe and why. You may ask for copies of relevant documents. At this point, you'll owe the disputed amount, plus any finance charges that accumulated while the amount was in dispute. You also may have to pay the minimum amount you missed paying because of the dispute.

If you disagree with the results of the investigation, you may write to the creditor, but you must act within 10 days after receiving the explanation, and you may indicate that you refuse to pay the disputed amount. At this point, the creditor may begin collection procedures. However, if the creditor reports you to a credit bureau as delinquent, the report also must state that

you don't think you owe the money. The creditor must tell you who gets these reports.


Suing the creditor

You can sue a creditor who violates the FCBA. If you win, you may be awarded damages, plus twice the amount of any finance charge - as long as it's between $100 and $1,000. The court also may order the creditor to pay your attorney's fees and costs.

If possible, hire a lawyer who is willing to accept the amount awarded to you by the court as the entire fee for representing you. Some lawyers may not take your case unless you agree to pay their fee - win or lose - or add to the court-awarded amount if they think it's too low.

Reporting FCBA violations

The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive, and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters consumer complaints into the Consumer Sentinel Network, a secure online database and investigative tool used by hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.





#102 Uncle Leo

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 09:03 AM

Note: There's an error in your BBC coding that will not let me quote/post everything you posted, and I'm not going to search the entire thing looking for it, so here's my response in a stand-alone format...

1. Source(s)?

2. This doesn't even begin to address the point. Not even close. The point was when it doesn't work, not inquiring about the process to make a claim.

3. Are you personally guaranteeing that it will... and does... work every time? Without fail? No exceptions?

4. Have you just identified yourself as a "policy bot"? :)

#103 athensgaguy

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 11:53 AM

Note: There's an error in your BBC coding that will not let me quote/post everything you posted, and I'm not going to search the entire thing looking for it, so here's my response in a stand-alone format...

1. Source(s)?

2. This doesn't even begin to address the point. Not even close. The point was when it doesn't work, not inquiring about the process to make a claim.

3. Are you personally guaranteeing that it will... and does... work every time? Without fail? No exceptions?

4. Have you just identified yourself as a "policy bot"? :(


1) Fair Credit Billing Act summary provided by the FTC.

2) It does address it, because this is much stronger than a zero liability policy from an issuer.

3) No, just because something is legally mandated does not mean that you will always win your lawsuit. I've never seen any credible proof of it not working when following procedure, though. The few cases of fraudulent purchases that happened to me got zapped by the zero liability policy, so I never needed to invoke the FCBA.

4) No, I was answering for the policy bots. I'm not a bot regardless of what you think of my posts.

(The question I was answering is "what do you do if the zero liability policy isn't working?")

Edited by athensgaguy, 14 July 2009 - 11:54 AM.


#104 GEORGE

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 12:10 PM

Note: There's an error in your BBC coding that will not let me quote/post everything you posted, and I'm not going to search the entire thing looking for it, so here's my response in a stand-alone format...

1. Source(s)?

2. This doesn't even begin to address the point. Not even close. The point was when it doesn't work, not inquiring about the process to make a claim.

3. Are you personally guaranteeing that it will... and does... work every time? Without fail? No exceptions?

4. Have you just identified yourself as a "policy bot"? :grin:


1) Fair Credit Billing Act summary provided by the FTC.

2) It does address it, because this is much stronger than a zero liability policy from an issuer.

3) No, just because something is legally mandated does not mean that you will always win your lawsuit. I've never seen any credible proof of it not working when following procedure, though. The few cases of fraudulent purchases that happened to me got zapped by the zero liability policy, so I never needed to invoke the FCBA.

4) No, I was answering for the policy bots. I'm not a bot regardless of what you think of my posts.

(The question I was answering is "what do you do if the zero liability policy isn't working?")

Maybe it is because they are on IGNORE that they don't get their answer

:(

#105 Uncle Leo

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 12:28 PM

Note: There's an error in your BBC coding that will not let me quote/post everything you posted, and I'm not going to search the entire thing looking for it, so here's my response in a stand-alone format...

1. Source(s)?

2. This doesn't even begin to address the point. Not even close. The point was when it doesn't work, not inquiring about the process to make a claim.

3. Are you personally guaranteeing that it will... and does... work every time? Without fail? No exceptions?

4. Have you just identified yourself as a "policy bot"? :angry:

1) Fair Credit Billing Act summary provided by the FTC.

2) It does address it, because this is much stronger than a zero liability policy from an issuer.

3) No, just because something is legally mandated does not mean that you will always win your lawsuit. I've never seen any credible proof of it not working when following procedure, though. The few cases of fraudulent purchases that happened to me got zapped by the zero liability policy, so I never needed to invoke the FCBA.

4) No, I was answering for the policy bots. I'm not a bot regardless of what you think of my posts.

(The question I was answering is "what do you do if the zero liability policy isn't working?")


Just jerkin' yer chain on #4, hence the " :P ".

#106 centex

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 12:40 PM

I'll tell you straight up that Zero Liability DOES NOT work...I was living proof of it. I was hit with more in fraud-related losses than some people whine was thefted from them by a particular lender...ZERO LIABILITY did precisely ZERO for me.

#107 webworm98

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 12:47 PM

I'll tell you straight up that Zero Liability DOES NOT work...I was living proof of it. I was hit with more in fraud-related losses than some people whine was thefted from them by a particular lender...ZERO LIABILITY did precisely ZERO for me.



Did you call Mastercard or Visa hotline and report the issuer for not honoring the zero liability policy they set? Just tell them the bank wouldnt honor the zero liability coverage. They may send you some forms. They will need your card number.

#108 centex

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:07 AM

I'll tell you straight up that Zero Liability DOES NOT work...I was living proof of it. I was hit with more in fraud-related losses than some people whine was thefted from them by a particular lender...ZERO LIABILITY did precisely ZERO for me.



Did you call Mastercard or Visa hotline and report the issuer for not honoring the zero liability policy they set? Just tell them the bank wouldnt honor the zero liability coverage. They may send you some forms. They will need your card number.


I jumped through every hoop short of actually filing in court...I did not have the time to engage in protracted litigation with major banks and the CRA's. To this day, BofA/FIA (the home of about $40K of the losses) has refused to acknowledge the matter, and these losses are now so old that they do not and have not appeared on reports for a couple of years.

People make out as though contacting the Wizard is going to magically right the wrongs in the Visa or MasterCard world, but most of those making the utterances seem to have no clue how the real world functions...

#109 webworm98

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 09:41 AM

I'll tell you straight up that Zero Liability DOES NOT work...I was living proof of it. I was hit with more in fraud-related losses than some people whine was thefted from them by a particular lender...ZERO LIABILITY did precisely ZERO for me.



Did you call Mastercard or Visa hotline and report the issuer for not honoring the zero liability policy they set? Just tell them the bank wouldnt honor the zero liability coverage. They may send you some forms. They will need your card number.


I jumped through every hoop short of actually filing in court...I did not have the time to engage in protracted litigation with major banks and the CRA's. To this day, BofA/FIA (the home of about $40K of the losses) has refused to acknowledge the matter, and these losses are now so old that they do not and have not appeared on reports for a couple of years.

People make out as though contacting the Wizard is going to magically right the wrongs in the Visa or MasterCard world, but most of those making the utterances seem to have no clue how the real world functions...


You didnt answer the question. Did you contact Visa or Mastercard customer service line and yes can talk to a representative about the bank not honoring the zero liablity policy. The banks have to honor the Visa or Mastercard zero liability unless they suspect you of fraud or you are over your 2 limit claim for the year, otherwise Mastercard and Visa would get in trouble with the FTC, and FCC for false advertising.

However, the card company may have violated this
http://www.ftc.gov/b...edit/cre04.shtm

FCBA
The 2 limit claim does not apply here. You may have to pay them 50.00 and that is it.



unauthorized transfers involving only your debit card number (not the loss of the card), you are liable only for transfers that occur after 60 days following the mailing of your bank statement containing the unauthorized use and before you report the loss.


These are the main reasons I used debit cards. Even after the 2 limit of Zero Liability, you can still claim the EFTA and pay only $50.00 or none depending if the exception applies.

Zero liability limited to 2 claims per year (Pin not included)
EFTA/FCBA unlimited claims allowed.

#110 centex

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:05 AM

How much more blunt can "I jumped through every hoop" be? I talked with V and MC people, filed forms, sent police reports and lost track of the number of people with the bank I spoke to (many of whom were further up the chain than the masses tend to get to).

The background of the $200K has been discussed on the boards in the past.

Like I said also...the shills can tout the policy all they want, but the reality is that when one is hit with identity-theft losses (a good chunk of which actually could have been prevented by asking for ID by the way) that approach $200K, ZERO LIABILITY SUCKS!

#111 webworm98

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 11:21 AM

How much more blunt can "I jumped through every hoop" be? I talked with V and MC people, filed forms, sent police reports and lost track of the number of people with the bank I spoke to (many of whom were further up the chain than the masses tend to get to).

The background of the $200K has been discussed on the boards in the past.

Like I said also...the shills can tout the policy all they want, but the reality is that when one is hit with identity-theft losses (a good chunk of which actually could have been prevented by asking for ID by the way) that approach $200K, ZERO LIABILITY SUCKS!



If it was that much, I would take time off work to file lawsuit, even if meant unpaid days. In fact, you could add that to the lawsuit, as lost wages and time.

From what I read from other sites and here most people have got their money back when fraud happens, be it debit or credit cards.

#112 GEORGE

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 01:58 PM

How much more blunt can "I jumped through every hoop" be? I talked with V and MC people, filed forms, sent police reports and lost track of the number of people with the bank I spoke to (many of whom were further up the chain than the masses tend to get to).

The background of the $200K has been discussed on the boards in the past.

Like I said also...the shills can tout the policy all they want, but the reality is that when one is hit with identity-theft losses (a good chunk of which actually could have been prevented by asking for ID by the way) that approach $200K, ZERO LIABILITY SUCKS!



If it was that much, I would take time off work to file lawsuit, even if meant unpaid days. In fact, you could add that to the lawsuit, as lost wages and time.

From what I read from other sites and here most people have got their money back when fraud happens, be it debit or credit cards.

webworm98...you are talking to a brick wall

THE SHIP HAS SAILED
==========================================
Talk about SHILL

Long live 100% responsibility for fraud

Edited by GEORGE, 15 July 2009 - 02:01 PM.


#113 Uncle Leo

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 02:01 PM

You are talking to a brick wall

THE SHIP HAS SAILED

:lol: Oh, God, I love good irony!

#114 GEORGE

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Posted 15 July 2009 - 03:15 PM

So did we get any money back???

Did they get reported???

Did you go back???

Did their policy change???

:rolleyes:

Edited by GEORGE, 15 July 2009 - 03:16 PM.


#115 Need More RWHP

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 12:29 PM

Contact BBB and state attorney general's office for misrepresentation of service and coercion. You were coerced into paying the $5 ATM fee or forced to order something you don't want to order in the form of payment they advertised to accept.

#116 Credit Savvy

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 12:18 AM

Wow, you guys won't believe this. As I mentioned, I work at a restaurant. Tonight a lady handed me the folder with the bill and her payment. She was immersed in her conversation, so I quietly took the folder and went to handle the payment. The folder contained both her driver's license and BoA card. The card was unsigned, no "See ID" or anything. I guess she's used to presenting her ID to people because of her unsigned card. What I can't get over is that she handed me her drivers license simply assuming that I would want to see it. I had her full name, DOB, and address right there along with her CC. :lol:

…and drivers license number and issue date and expiration date, etc., etc.. No reasonable adult would hand over their ID to a complete stranger for no reason. With clueless crazies such as this on the loose, no wonder there is so much identity theft today.




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