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Strange experience when I used my CC the other day


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#126 Continental

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 08:08 AM


So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99.

I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

Why didn't you say something THEN?

Sorry, but I don't have any respect for people who go against their instincts, and THEN complain about it. That certainly is not the way I operate.

I would have complained then and there, and demanded to speak to a manager.

The answer is simple: it really didn't begin to bother me until after we left the store. I have been in situations where I do not have to show ID, even though others may have to (my bank, where the tellers know me by name is a perfect example). Initially, I thought the same dynamic could have been present in this situation.

After I gave it more thought, and really jogged my memory as to the level of intimacy during the conversation between the patron/cashier, then I really began to question things.

FYI: your post was for the most part, helpful. However, whether or not you have respect for me is something I hardly care about, nor is that little tidbit relevant.

Constructive criticism is always welcome.

Snide remarks are not.

Quite frankly, your whining about this situation AFTER the fact did not invite constructive criticism. Rather, as your post indicated, you simply wanted to vent, and as such, you must expect to have your actions called into question, as well.

A truly proactive individual would have handled the situation on the spot, or, in the alternative, would have ALREADY complained to Dairy Queen corporate, and/or to Visa International, rather than simply "venting" on an Internet message board.

If I feel that my rights have been violated, or that I am being treated in a disparate manner, I handle it. Certainly, this board encourages the sharing of information and experiences, but it appears you have done nothing constructive to address the situation.

The victim mentality just does not play well with me.

"Victim mentality". Whining?

Let me give you a little insight. Getting a possible incident of racial discrimination off one's chest is NOT "whining" as you call it, nor is it playing the "victim mentality".

Sorry to break the news to ya, but racism is alive and well in this country. Complaining it about it, even on a public message board is certainly nothing to be ashamed of.

FURTHERMORE...

Everyone "handles it" on their own schedule. Just because you may have assumed the cashier in question treated you in a disparate manner (and would have said something right there), doesn't mean that someone who chose not to is not "handling" the situation.

I have chosen to re-live the events over and over in my mind, to better gain clarity into what really happened. WHY? The answer is simple:

Even implying that someone may have slighted you on racial grounds can have enormous consequences for the person accused of the indiscretion.
Depending on the mood of the store manager, the cashier in question could be fired.

I have worked for years in customer service, and have witnessed first hand employees fired for a letter of complaint -- even if there was no real grounds for the complaint.

THAT SAID...

Racial discrimination comes in all different levels of subtlety nowadays. Rarely do people come outright and put a "No Colored People Allowed" sign on the front door of their establishments (yes, this used to be quite prevalent in case you didn't know).

Nowadays, it's much more subtle. That subtlety could cause me to "see" an act of racism, when the reality of the situation could be a perfectly legitimate explanation.

To give you an example: it's late at night and I'm walking to the corner store for a pack of smokes. A white woman walking toward me on my side of the street, chooses to cross the street. Immediately, my instincts would tell me it's because I'm black. Upon further review of the situation, however, I think to myself...it may be because I'm a man, regardless of the color of my skin. And as we all know, women have to be very vigilant in today's world.

Is that a case of racism? Or a woman who crosses the street for every guy she sees coming in her direction after a certain time of night? In many situations, one will never know the real answer.

Was this just a friendly cashier who recognized a patron? Or a woman who felt that a black man with a credit card must have stolen it?

If someone outright says "I'm sorry, we don't serve black people", your darn right the appropriate action will immediately be taken. A much more subtle incident of possible discrimination..I'm going to think long and hard and really be sure before I make that claim.

And THAT is why I have chosen to really think things over. Sorry I didn't reach my conclusion on your time schedule, but I'm sure you'll get over it.

If you are so truly outraged by what occurred to you, then you would have said something either on the spot, or would have already made a complaint to Dairy Queen corporate or to Visa International.

From reading some of the comments here, I will definitely speak up next time.

1. Print the page from the PDF of both Visa and MasterCard and present this to them when they require ID. Be sure to hand write the URLs to these PDFs on the back of each so you can provide your source for the information to the store management.

2. Print the MasterCard Merchant Violation Page and present this to store management.

3. Black out your name and address on the confirmation letter you received from Visa and present that letter the store.

4. Ask the store to show you, in writing, their policy that states ID is required. You have provided them with documentation from the credit card companies that ID is not allowed. Ask them to provide you with documentation their company has produced that says otherwise. Nobody is going to be able to come up with any such documentation because NO retailer has ANY corporate produced materials that state to require ID on a signed credit card transaction.





#127 hegemony

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 08:27 PM

I'm not unaware of the fact the reported post within this thread is OVER 2 YEARS OLD.

I am dismissing the report due to it's frivolous nature.

Somebody here has been known for bumping MORE than a few OLD posts

...and it does not start with "C"

:blink:
so?

Edited by hegemony, 28 February 2009 - 08:29 PM.


#128 GEORGE

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 09:14 PM

SNEEZE

#129 hegemony

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 10:41 PM

SNEEZE

GESUNDHEIT

#130 Continental

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 03:32 AM

Showing ID is not for my protection, and I have little patience for merchants who lie about their motives for wanting to check it. My liability is already $0. ID is a prohibited hassle, and having to show your papers to buy a cup of coffee is downright un-American. ID checks can cause ID theft. Why is my address or driver's license number any of the clerk's business?



#131 Continental

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 04:54 AM

This happened to me at Christmas Tree Shoppes here in Mass, the kid didn’t ask the lady in front of me but asked me, I said "No thank you" - he says "I need to check it to make sure its you" - I say "you match signatures to the one on the back of the card for that" - then he asked his manager (standing to the left of him in a podium) and she said "yeah, go ahead". It ticked me off 'cause the lady in front of me was white and I'm latino - there's really no conclusion to make other than a racial one.



#132 Need More RWHP

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 12:15 PM

Is this really a policy? When I worked at Circuit City, we were required to see ID from everyone, regardless of whether the card was signed or not. Never once had any complaint, and had many thanks. Even earned a couple monetary rewards in my time there by stopping theft by checking ID and catching a fraudulent transaction (all three times the card was signed.)

So, if it is a policy of MC/Visa to not have to show ID, why do so many retailers specifically require it?


And those horrible scumbags crashed and burned.

#133 Need More RWHP

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 12:20 PM

This happened to me at Christmas Tree Shoppes here in Mass, the kid didn’t ask the lady in front of me but asked me, I said "No thank you" - he says "I need to check it to make sure its you" - I say "you match signatures to the one on the back of the card for that" - then he asked his manager (standing to the left of him in a podium) and she said "yeah, go ahead". It ticked me off 'cause the lady in front of me was white and I'm latino - there's really no conclusion to make other than a racial one.


Something like that happened to me at Wal*Mart. Cashier did not ask the older man in front of me for his ID. Asked me for ID. I said "you didn't ask the gentleman a head of me, why am I being asked?" she said "ok, fine", but I made her get the manager. They made up the BS "computer said so" line, but I got in their face about profiling and discrimination based on apparent age.

#134 GEORGE

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Posted 21 July 2009 - 06:43 PM

This happened to me at Christmas Tree Shoppes here in Mass, the kid didn’t ask the lady in front of me but asked me, I said "No thank you" - he says "I need to check it to make sure its you" - I say "you match signatures to the one on the back of the card for that" - then he asked his manager (standing to the left of him in a podium) and she said "yeah, go ahead". It ticked me off 'cause the lady in front of me was white and I'm latino - there's really no conclusion to make other than a racial one.


Something like that happened to me at Wal*Mart. Cashier did not ask the older man in front of me for his ID. Asked me for ID. I said "you didn't ask the gentleman a head of me, why am I being asked?" she said "ok, fine", but I made her get the manager. They made up the BS "computer said so" line, but I got in their face about profiling and discrimination based on apparent age.

COMPARE SIGNATURE is not the same as ASK FOR DRIVER'S LICENSE

Read the screen

#135 webworm98

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Posted 22 July 2009 - 07:32 AM

This happened to me at Christmas Tree Shoppes here in Mass, the kid didn’t ask the lady in front of me but asked me, I said "No thank you" - he says "I need to check it to make sure its you" - I say "you match signatures to the one on the back of the card for that" - then he asked his manager (standing to the left of him in a podium) and she said "yeah, go ahead". It ticked me off 'cause the lady in front of me was white and I'm latino - there's really no conclusion to make other than a racial one.


Something like that happened to me at Wal*Mart. Cashier did not ask the older man in front of me for his ID. Asked me for ID. I said "you didn't ask the gentleman a head of me, why am I being asked?" she said "ok, fine", but I made her get the manager. They made up the BS "computer said so" line, but I got in their face about profiling and discrimination based on apparent age.


Just write corporate and tell them the machine is programed wrong. (Do not say it does not happen or i am imagining things.) I have actually seen it popped up "Check ID" .

#136 GEORGE

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Posted 22 July 2009 - 10:53 PM

This happened to me at Christmas Tree Shoppes here in Mass, the kid didn’t ask the lady in front of me but asked me, I said "No thank you" - he says "I need to check it to make sure its you" - I say "you match signatures to the one on the back of the card for that" - then he asked his manager (standing to the left of him in a podium) and she said "yeah, go ahead". It ticked me off 'cause the lady in front of me was white and I'm latino - there's really no conclusion to make other than a racial one.


Something like that happened to me at Wal*Mart. Cashier did not ask the older man in front of me for his ID. Asked me for ID. I said "you didn't ask the gentleman a head of me, why am I being asked?" she said "ok, fine", but I made her get the manager. They made up the BS "computer said so" line, but I got in their face about profiling and discrimination based on apparent age.


Just write corporate and tell them the machine is programed wrong. (Do not say it does not happen or i am imagining things.) I have actually seen it popped up "Check ID" .

I (PERSONALLY) have never seen CHECK ID for a credit card on the screen at WALMART

Edited by GEORGE, 22 July 2009 - 10:54 PM.


#137 thelowpriceleader

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 12:42 AM

Wal Mart screen flags random transactions and the following prompt displays on the screen:

COMPARE SIGNATURES
ON CARD AND SLIP

(cashier needs to press clear to acknowledge or bypass this- every single time I've had a flagged transaction there it has been bypassed without my being asked for ID and without the cashier comparing signature on card and slip)

Nothing about ID anywhere in that alert. They reworded the alert to make it very clear what to do, as the old alert that said

COMPARE SIGNATURES
CREDIT

was being misinterpreted as an ID check prompt.

Yet the alert never said ANYTHING about ID. It was misinterpreted by stores, or stores were making up their own rules.

#138 Uncle Leo

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:26 AM

(cashier needs to press clear to acknowledge or bypass this- every single time I've had a flagged transaction there it has been bypassed without my being asked for ID and without the cashier comparing signature on card and slip)

Same thing usually happens to me. They just press a button to make it go away and do nothing either way.

#139 green2408

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 06:02 AM

Well, I don't know what to think. Part of me wonders if this was something totally innocuous for which there is a simple explanation. Part of me wonders if it was something more.

On Friday April 28th, I was on my last day of a 7 day trip to Oregon. That afternoon, I stopped into a Dairy Queen in a small town on the coast. Between myself, parents, and people travelling with us, there was always someone who'd wanted some ice cream by the end of the day, and this was my 6th daily stop into DQ's in the area. Each time, I was the one to go in and order while everyone else waited in the car. Each time, I used the same CC to pay.

So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99. The place was completely empy of patrons, except for two older men who came in behind me. When I pulled out my CC, the woman looked it over, then asked to see my ID.

For a split second, I was a little surprised, since I'd never been ID'd at any other DQ's in the area. However, I always appreciate it when someone does ask to see ID and gladly obliged.

A few minutes went by while they made my order, and during that time, the two older men placed their order. They were probably in their late 60's early 70's. Their total came to $18.54, at which time one of the men pulled out a CC. It was a grey card that said "US Bank Platinum".

The cashier took the card and ran it -- without asking to see ID. And that is what's bothered me ever since.

Ever since then, I kept telling myself that she probably knew them. This was a small town afterall. However, every time I think back to their conversation, I don't remember any sort of familiarity between the patrons and cashier.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

So now I'm torn. Was going to chalk the whole thing up to perhaps a simple misunderstanding on my part. But now I think I might write a polite letter to the store manager. Explain to them what happened and tell them if it was a simple misunderstanding, they have my apologies. However, if it was perhaps something more, it would be a good idea for the store to enforce whatever CC ID policies they may have, to all patrons.

Anyway thanks for letting me vent.



wait, let me get this straight, you're black and you wonder if people could possibly discriminate between black and white credit card users???

OK - YES, they could.

That happened to me once, eonly I'm white and the person in front of me was black and was ID'ed and I wasn't.

This is partly why credit card companies don't want ID as part of their acceptance procedures.

#140 webworm98

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 08:33 AM

Well, I don't know what to think. Part of me wonders if this was something totally innocuous for which there is a simple explanation. Part of me wonders if it was something more.

On Friday April 28th, I was on my last day of a 7 day trip to Oregon. That afternoon, I stopped into a Dairy Queen in a small town on the coast. Between myself, parents, and people travelling with us, there was always someone who'd wanted some ice cream by the end of the day, and this was my 6th daily stop into DQ's in the area. Each time, I was the one to go in and order while everyone else waited in the car. Each time, I used the same CC to pay.

So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99. The place was completely empy of patrons, except for two older men who came in behind me. When I pulled out my CC, the woman looked it over, then asked to see my ID.

For a split second, I was a little surprised, since I'd never been ID'd at any other DQ's in the area. However, I always appreciate it when someone does ask to see ID and gladly obliged.

A few minutes went by while they made my order, and during that time, the two older men placed their order. They were probably in their late 60's early 70's. Their total came to $18.54, at which time one of the men pulled out a CC. It was a grey card that said "US Bank Platinum".

The cashier took the card and ran it -- without asking to see ID. And that is what's bothered me ever since.

Ever since then, I kept telling myself that she probably knew them. This was a small town afterall. However, every time I think back to their conversation, I don't remember any sort of familiarity between the patrons and cashier.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

So now I'm torn. Was going to chalk the whole thing up to perhaps a simple misunderstanding on my part. But now I think I might write a polite letter to the store manager. Explain to them what happened and tell them if it was a simple misunderstanding, they have my apologies. However, if it was perhaps something more, it would be a good idea for the store to enforce whatever CC ID policies they may have, to all patrons.

Anyway thanks for letting me vent.



wait, let me get this straight, you're black and you wonder if people could possibly discriminate between black and white credit card users???

OK - YES, they could.

That happened to me once, eonly I'm white and the person in front of me was black and was ID'ed and I wasn't.

This is partly why credit card companies don't want ID as part of their acceptance procedures.



I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not. White cashier. Sometime, I think it is how the credit cards look. Some of those card look so fake. When I used HSBC (Direct merchants) black card. A lot merchants thought that card was a fake, it was so black. Didn't have HSBC or Direct merchants name anywhere on the card.

#141 green2408

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 04:36 AM

Well, I don't know what to think. Part of me wonders if this was something totally innocuous for which there is a simple explanation. Part of me wonders if it was something more.

On Friday April 28th, I was on my last day of a 7 day trip to Oregon. That afternoon, I stopped into a Dairy Queen in a small town on the coast. Between myself, parents, and people travelling with us, there was always someone who'd wanted some ice cream by the end of the day, and this was my 6th daily stop into DQ's in the area. Each time, I was the one to go in and order while everyone else waited in the car. Each time, I used the same CC to pay.

So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99. The place was completely empy of patrons, except for two older men who came in behind me. When I pulled out my CC, the woman looked it over, then asked to see my ID.

For a split second, I was a little surprised, since I'd never been ID'd at any other DQ's in the area. However, I always appreciate it when someone does ask to see ID and gladly obliged.

A few minutes went by while they made my order, and during that time, the two older men placed their order. They were probably in their late 60's early 70's. Their total came to $18.54, at which time one of the men pulled out a CC. It was a grey card that said "US Bank Platinum".

The cashier took the card and ran it -- without asking to see ID. And that is what's bothered me ever since.

Ever since then, I kept telling myself that she probably knew them. This was a small town afterall. However, every time I think back to their conversation, I don't remember any sort of familiarity between the patrons and cashier.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

So now I'm torn. Was going to chalk the whole thing up to perhaps a simple misunderstanding on my part. But now I think I might write a polite letter to the store manager. Explain to them what happened and tell them if it was a simple misunderstanding, they have my apologies. However, if it was perhaps something more, it would be a good idea for the store to enforce whatever CC ID policies they may have, to all patrons.

Anyway thanks for letting me vent.



wait, let me get this straight, you're black and you wonder if people could possibly discriminate between black and white credit card users???

OK - YES, they could.

That happened to me once, eonly I'm white and the person in front of me was black and was ID'ed and I wasn't.

This is partly why credit card companies don't want ID as part of their acceptance procedures.



I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not. White cashier. Sometime, I think it is how the credit cards look. Some of those card look so fake. When I used HSBC (Direct merchants) black card. A lot merchants thought that card was a fake, it was so black. Didn't have HSBC or Direct merchants name anywhere on the card.



That's right,webworm, there are other possible explanations for what looks like racism, or it could be.....racism! That's the reason to remove ID checks from all customers.

#142 webworm98

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 08:06 AM

Well, I don't know what to think. Part of me wonders if this was something totally innocuous for which there is a simple explanation. Part of me wonders if it was something more.

On Friday April 28th, I was on my last day of a 7 day trip to Oregon. That afternoon, I stopped into a Dairy Queen in a small town on the coast. Between myself, parents, and people travelling with us, there was always someone who'd wanted some ice cream by the end of the day, and this was my 6th daily stop into DQ's in the area. Each time, I was the one to go in and order while everyone else waited in the car. Each time, I used the same CC to pay.

So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99. The place was completely empy of patrons, except for two older men who came in behind me. When I pulled out my CC, the woman looked it over, then asked to see my ID.

For a split second, I was a little surprised, since I'd never been ID'd at any other DQ's in the area. However, I always appreciate it when someone does ask to see ID and gladly obliged.

A few minutes went by while they made my order, and during that time, the two older men placed their order. They were probably in their late 60's early 70's. Their total came to $18.54, at which time one of the men pulled out a CC. It was a grey card that said "US Bank Platinum".

The cashier took the card and ran it -- without asking to see ID. And that is what's bothered me ever since.

Ever since then, I kept telling myself that she probably knew them. This was a small town afterall. However, every time I think back to their conversation, I don't remember any sort of familiarity between the patrons and cashier.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

So now I'm torn. Was going to chalk the whole thing up to perhaps a simple misunderstanding on my part. But now I think I might write a polite letter to the store manager. Explain to them what happened and tell them if it was a simple misunderstanding, they have my apologies. However, if it was perhaps something more, it would be a good idea for the store to enforce whatever CC ID policies they may have, to all patrons.

Anyway thanks for letting me vent.



wait, let me get this straight, you're black and you wonder if people could possibly discriminate between black and white credit card users???

OK - YES, they could.

That happened to me once, eonly I'm white and the person in front of me was black and was ID'ed and I wasn't.

This is partly why credit card companies don't want ID as part of their acceptance procedures.



I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not. White cashier. Sometime, I think it is how the credit cards look. Some of those card look so fake. When I used HSBC (Direct merchants) black card. A lot merchants thought that card was a fake, it was so black. Didn't have HSBC or Direct merchants name anywhere on the card.



That's right,webworm, there are other possible explanations for what looks like racism, or it could be.....racism! That's the reason to remove ID checks from all customers.


No it is not racism. At least read my post before you comment. Require everyone to show ID, when using a credit or debit card that would also work. I came across the truck stop (Not I dont drive a truck-Good food) that requires ID when using a credit/debit card, they also had a minimum purchase of $3.00 required. I paid cash. I like the food but do not trust the workers.

#143 green2408

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 11:08 AM

Well, I don't know what to think. Part of me wonders if this was something totally innocuous for which there is a simple explanation. Part of me wonders if it was something more.

On Friday April 28th, I was on my last day of a 7 day trip to Oregon. That afternoon, I stopped into a Dairy Queen in a small town on the coast. Between myself, parents, and people travelling with us, there was always someone who'd wanted some ice cream by the end of the day, and this was my 6th daily stop into DQ's in the area. Each time, I was the one to go in and order while everyone else waited in the car. Each time, I used the same CC to pay.

So I walked in and ordered a blizzard. Grand total: $1.99. The place was completely empy of patrons, except for two older men who came in behind me. When I pulled out my CC, the woman looked it over, then asked to see my ID.

For a split second, I was a little surprised, since I'd never been ID'd at any other DQ's in the area. However, I always appreciate it when someone does ask to see ID and gladly obliged.

A few minutes went by while they made my order, and during that time, the two older men placed their order. They were probably in their late 60's early 70's. Their total came to $18.54, at which time one of the men pulled out a CC. It was a grey card that said "US Bank Platinum".

The cashier took the card and ran it -- without asking to see ID. And that is what's bothered me ever since.

Ever since then, I kept telling myself that she probably knew them. This was a small town afterall. However, every time I think back to their conversation, I don't remember any sort of familiarity between the patrons and cashier.

On the other side of the coin, I'm wondering if a black man with a credit card could have sent off a red flag to the cashier in question.

So now I'm torn. Was going to chalk the whole thing up to perhaps a simple misunderstanding on my part. But now I think I might write a polite letter to the store manager. Explain to them what happened and tell them if it was a simple misunderstanding, they have my apologies. However, if it was perhaps something more, it would be a good idea for the store to enforce whatever CC ID policies they may have, to all patrons.

Anyway thanks for letting me vent.



wait, let me get this straight, you're black and you wonder if people could possibly discriminate between black and white credit card users???

OK - YES, they could.

That happened to me once, eonly I'm white and the person in front of me was black and was ID'ed and I wasn't.

This is partly why credit card companies don't want ID as part of their acceptance procedures.



I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not. White cashier. Sometime, I think it is how the credit cards look. Some of those card look so fake. When I used HSBC (Direct merchants) black card. A lot merchants thought that card was a fake, it was so black. Didn't have HSBC or Direct merchants name anywhere on the card.



That's right,webworm, there are other possible explanations for what looks like racism, or it could be.....racism! That's the reason to remove ID checks from all customers.


No it is not racism. At least read my post before you comment. Require everyone to show ID, when using a credit or debit card that would also work. I came across the truck stop (Not I dont drive a truck-Good food) that requires ID when using a credit/debit card, they also had a minimum purchase of $3.00 required. I paid cash. I like the food but do not trust the workers.



IDing a white person and not a black person even if by a white cashier, is still open to a possible interpretation of racism.
It's not gonna happen that everyone is IDed and wouldn't be enforceable because not everyone has the ID that would satisfy a consistent rule, for just one practical objection, so why ID anyone?????

#144 PizPump

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 07:36 PM

I commute often from OR to CA and am ID'd when using CC (in person) more often than not. It's extremely annoying. I'm a white guy (with a bad attitude) so I don't think it's a racial thing.

#145 GEORGE

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 07:44 PM

I commute often from OR to CA and am ID'd when using CC (in person) more often than not. It's extremely annoying. I'm a white guy (with a bad attitude) so I don't think it's a racial thing.

"IF" you are "ANNOYED" why do you let them have their way???

#146 Credit Savvy

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:21 AM

I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not.

IDing is for age verification, not credit card use.

#147 GEORGE

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 09:08 PM

I dont think it has anything to do with race. I was IDed, when a black person was not.

IDing is for age verification, not credit card use.

"IF" you are NOT buying any "AGE RESTRICTED ITEMS" your statement is FALSE

Edited by GEORGE, 02 August 2009 - 09:08 PM.


#148 Credit Savvy

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:36 PM

Dairy Queen does not sell any age-restricted items.

#149 webworm98

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:42 PM

Dairy Queen does not sell any age-restricted items.


:o :D :rofl:

#150 GEORGE

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:14 AM

Dairy Queen does not sell any age-restricted items.

NEITHER DOES SEE'S CANDIES IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

(they backed-off)




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